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Did you know when used in a regimen, D`OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits?

doxyva benefits

OPTIMIZE BLOOD CIRCULATION FOR A WIDE VARIETY OF SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) in various clinical trials has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions at the same time.

People using D’OXYVA® have recorded significant improvements in cardiovascular activity leading to much improved physical activity. As part of a healthy lifestyle, D’OXYVA may help significantly reduce the risk of high blood pressure, hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes in just two or three months, with an average use of 5 minutes a day and 5 times a week.

Poor circulation is a gateway for a litany of ailments: slow healing, depression, poor complexion, sores, slow metabolism, and more.

D’OXYVA significantly improves sustained oxygen-rich microcirculatory blood flow locally and throughout the body. Its patented method of fully non-invasive, painless, and harmless transdermal delivery is unique only to D’OXYVA.

When used daily, D’OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits, including but not limited to:

  • Relief from symptoms of microvascular complications
  • Significantly increased cardiac function, physical fitness, endurance and strength, muscle size, body tone, faster recovery from sports injuries and surgical trauma
  • Improved self-esteem via promoting healthy and radiant skin, complexion, dry skin relief, and acne reduction
  • Significant reduction in downtime from other skin treatments and cosmetic procedures when used in combination, reduction in the appearance of scars, cellulite, fat, spider veins and stretch marks
  • Promoting and maintaining a healthy weight, improving general mobility, deeper, more restful sleep
  • Significant improvement of mental acuity; concentration, problem solving, multitasking, eye-hand coordination, heightened stamina, energy, and focus while managing stress
  • Improved vitals across the board during checkups with zero adverse event reports after years of regular use by people with various health, demographic, and ethnic backgrounds

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Can Oxygen Therapy Improve Brain Blood Vessel Function in COPD Patients?

By Allison Inserro

Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brains of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in Experimental Physiology.

The study revealed that patients with COPD are at higher risk of dementia, possibly because of lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from brain blood vessels. According to other research cited in the study, giving patients with COPD additional oxygen reduced their risk of developing dementia, but the mechanisms underlying this effect had not been explored.

The latest research aimed to establish the effect of supplying additional oxygen in blood flow to the brain and blood vessel function in patients with COPD. Fourteen hypoxemia patients were included in the study, which tracked cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen delivery (CDO2), and neurovascular coupling (NVC), which is the relationship between local neuron activity and changes in CBF.

The researchers used ultrasound to view and measure blood flow in the brain in these patients at rest as well as before and during delivery of the additional oxygen. Ultrasound was used to measure the extent to which brain blood flow increased.

Participants began this test with their eyes shut, then opened them and read a piece of text. This test was designed to increase activity in the brain, and brain blood flow was expected to increase to provide an adequate oxygen supply.

Pairing these ultrasound measures with a measurement of blood oxygen levels allowed authors to estimate how much oxygen delivery to the brain increased during the eyes-open reading test.

Measurements were assessed, and the authors found that blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain significantly increased during reading because blood vessels in the brain dilated in response to the greater oxygen demand when the brain was active.

Specifically, peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation increased from 91 ± 3.3 to 97.4 ± 3% (P <.01). CBF was unaltered (593.0 ± 162.8 vs 590.1 ± 138.5 mL min−1; P = .91) with supplemental O2.

However, CDO22 (98.1 ± 25.7 versus 108.7 ± 28.4 ml dl−1; P = 0.02) and NVC improved.

The posterior cerebral artery cerebrovascular conductance increased after O2 normalization (+40%, from 20.4 ± 9.9 to 28 ± 10.4% increase in conductance; P = .04). The posterior cerebral artery cerebrovascular resistance decreased to a greater extent during O2 normalization (+22%, from −16.7 ± 7.3 to −21.4 ± 6.6% decrease in resistance; P = .04).

The cerebral vasculature of patients with COPD appears insensitive to oxygen because CBF was unaltered in response to O2 supplementation, leading to improved CDO2.

Providing extra oxygen to patients with COPD improved the function of blood vessels in the brain by increasing blood supply to meet the demands of the brain’s activity during this short test.

Other research is needed to see how long-term oxygen use would impact the function of brain blood vessels.

These improvements might provide a physiological link between oxygen therapy and a reduced risk of cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia.

Ref: https://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/can-oxygen-therapy-…

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Depression and cerebral blood flow

Depression and cerebral blood flow

Maybe a benefit will arise from the current debate about the usefulness of antidepressants in depression, if it draws attention to the published studies concerning reduced regional cerebral blood flow in depression which have failed to influence clinical opinion. Perhaps the relevance of such information can be appreciated by reference to the study by Lucey et al. (1) They showed that in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder, there were regional reductions in cerebral blood flow, but in each disorder in different regions of the brain.

It is proposed that depression is the dysfunctional state arising from inadequate rates of blood flow to deliver the necessary oxygen and nutrient substrates to sustain normal tissue function in specific regions of the brain. This means that the condition would be reversible when there were adequate rates of blood flow.

In 1990, Sackheim et al (2) critically examined what had been written about regional cerebral blood flow in mood disorders. An important contribution was made by Bench et al (3) who reported their findings in a study in which previously scanned patients were rescanned on remission. They concluded, “Thus, recovery from depression is associated with increases in regional cerebral blood flow in the same area in which focal decreases in regional cerebral blood flow are described in the depressed state, in comparison with normal subjects.” Similar findings were reported in another paper (4) which reported that the reduced rate of blood flow in the left frontal region which had been observed during depression, returned to normal during remission. The lack of attention given to such findings probably reflects the current antipathy to reports which imply a role for the flow properties of blood (blood rheology).

It is possible to interpret such changes in blood flow in terms of the effects of poorly deformable red cells, which reflect change in their environment by a reduction in fluidity of the the cell membrane. Normalisation of the cell environment restores normal levels of deformability. So it is not surprising that depression is a frequent problem in chronic disorders which are known to have altered blood rheology manifested as increased blood viscosity and poorly deformable red cells, such as in diabetes for example.

Kamada et al (5) in 1986 reported that sardine oil so increased the fluidity of the membranes of diabetic red cells that they were unable to distinguish such cells from those of non-diabetics. Ten years later Maes et al (6) noted that, ” Major depressed subjects had significantly lower C18-3 omega-3 in cholesteryl esters than normal controls. Major depressed subjects showed significantly lower total omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids… than minor depressed subjects and healthy controls.” A later study of the omega-3 fatty acid content in the diet and in red cell membranes of depressed patients (7) noted that, “Lower red blood cell membrane n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are associated with the severity of depression,” and concluded, “The findings raise the possibility that depressive symptoms may be relieved by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.”

Ten years later there is no indication that the significance of such findings have been recognised and therapy for depression has been based upon antidepressants rather that omega-3 rich fish oil which might correct the primary problem. Possibly, if the current debate leads to a more public recognition of the problems of cerebral blood flow in depression, then maybe those who suffer from depression will explore the potential benefits of taking 2 x 1000mg capsules of fish oil, three times daily. Many studies have used 10 capsules daily, and one study reported that the maximal tolerable dose was twenty grams daily. Because of the need for the enzyme delta-6-desaturase to be functional in order to utilise the plant derived alphalinolenic acid, it is safer to use fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids. An alternative would be to increase the dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids by including sardines or oily fish in meals on a daily basis.

In addition, because regular light exercise has been shown to reduce blood viscosity, an activity such as walking or dancing should be part of the daily programme. A good example was an Australian study involving “pram pushing” which was shown to be beneficial for women with post-partum depression.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Diet, Exercise Combined Can Improve Blood Circulation in The Brain

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New research suggests that losing weight through diet and exercise could help improve blood circulation in the brains of older adults with type 2 diabetes, which can also help improve cognitive functioning.

Type 2 diabetes can affect blood circulation by stiffening blood vessels and reducing the amount of oxygen that circulates throughout the body, including the brain, which can affect the way we think and make decisions.

Cognitive problems have also been linked to being overweight and obese, conditions that are common for those with type 2 diabetes.

Although lowering calorie intake and increasing physical activity are already known to reduce the negative effects of type 2 diabetes on the body, the effect on the brain has so far been unclear.

To research a possible connection, the team behind the new study looked at information from a 10-year-long study called Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD).

As the study teaches participants to implement healthy, long-term lifestyle changes, the researchers were able to focus in on whether participants with type 2 diabetes — who made their lifestyles healthier by eating fewer calories and increasing their physical activity — had better blood flow to the brain.

They looked at 310 overweight or obese participants taking part in the study, aged 45 to 76 and with type 2 diabetes, and assigned the participants to two groups.

In the first group, participants were given a daily goal of eating between 1200 to 1800 calories in order to lose weight, based on their initial weight.

They also had a goal of partaking in 175 minutes of physical activity throughout the week through activities such as brisk walking.

The second group acted as a control group, who instead of following a diet and exercise plan attended Diabetes Support and Education classes.

During the study, the participants all had their mental functions tested, including their verbal learning, memory, decision-making ability, and other cognitive functions, and around ten years after the start of the study completed an MRI brain scan.

The team found that those who made the healthy lifestyle changes of eating fewer calories and increasing their physical activity had greater blood flow in the brain.

The results also suggested that the lifestyle changes were more effective in increasing or maintaining blood flow in the brain for individuals who were overweight but not obese.

However, the team still concluded that for all participants, whether overweight or obese, long-term weight loss through diet and exercise is beneficial in increasing brain flow in those with type 2 diabetes.

The researchers published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.



Reference: https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/277528/diet-exercise-combined-can-improve-blood-circulation-in-the-brain-of-type-2-diabetes-patients/#ixzz5lDytsUP3 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Did you know that you can have a 20 year old brain At 80?

Stats are greatly against us. On average, by the age of 70 our brain will be 15% lighter than it was in our 20s, beginning to deteriorate with aging damage in our 30s. Fifty is considered the new 30 in modern anti-aging circles. But when brain cell power yields way to younger ones as a result of age-related oxidation, cell death, plaque buildup, impaired blood flow, energy loss and other environmental and biochemical assaults, 50 becomes, well, just plain old. And depressing.

Brain cells don’t divide unlike those of the skin and other tissues. Generally, when cells divide and are in prime health, repair genes can actually make the next division healthier. The progenitor cells die off, too, leaving only the healthier nuclei of new cells behind. The cerebral cells simply have no second chance; they can’t improve their lot through the usual method. Damage control is more difficult and much more necessary.

Especially in older populations, dementia occurs in tandem with depression, leading scientists to surmise midlife blues are a form of brain damage.

The co-occurrence of depression and cognitive impairment doubles every five years after age 70, and by the time one is 85, the chances are 25% that one will be afflicted with depression and cognitive impairment that will adversely impact one’s life, say Guy G. Potter, PhD of the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina and David C. Steffens, MD, of the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. “Depression is primarily a mood disorder, but it can also be viewed as a cognitive disorder for many older adults, they add.

Reference: http://www.healthylivingmagazine.us/Articles/539/

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.


The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

What our customers are saying?

I did not expect these results at all but I am happy I did give this product a shot. D’Oxyva makes me sleep better at night and increased my sex drive. I can accomplish more things during the day with my energy up. Great product.
E. Mason
U.S.A.
I show clear change in my skin with D’OXYVA. I feel rejuvenated and energized throughout the day. Thanks to the blog that suggested me to start D’OXYVA.
Brittany
U.S.A.
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Improved Microcirculation Against Diabetes, Stroke and Several Other Diseases

Exercise has been shown to protect against diabetes, stroke and several other diseases and to improve our moods.

But does it also make us more likely to engage in other activities? Do people who exercise tend to have better social lives or achieve more of their goals?

All clinical evidence so far validates that the science of exercise physiology best explains the outsized and unmatched vast health benefits of D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) and opens up entirely new ways of thinking about the treatment of the underlying causes of the most severe and widespread medical conditions.

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Cerebral Blood Flow Predicts Later Cognitive Function in Older Individuals

NEW YORK—Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in healthy older people predicts cognitive function four years later, according to results from an arterial-spin-labeling perfusion-MRI study.

 

“Specifically, we found that brain blood flow measured at the present time can predict a person’s general cognitive ability and, most significantly, memory function,” Dr. Hanzhang Lu from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, Maryland, told Reuters Health by email. “Across different brain regions we studied, we found that the frontal lobe is the most important in determining future cognitive function.”

 

Cognitive abilities decline with age starting from the third decade of life, with the greatest effects on fluid cognition (related to performing tasks). Neuroimaging studies have shown that both brain structure and function deteriorate with age. It remains to be seen, however, whether a particular biomarker can predict future cognitive performance.

 

Dr. Lu’s team examined the relationship between CBF and cognitive function among 309 participants aged 20 to 89 years in the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study.

 

At the year four follow-up, all participants remained free of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, but there were age-related decreases in CBF and cognition. Participants who were older at baseline experienced faster declines in cognitive function, compared with younger subjects.

 

Among participants who were 54 years or older at baseline, higher whole-brain CBF at baseline significantly predicted better fluid cognition (a construct of processing speed, working memory, reasoning, and episodic memory) four years later, the team reports in the Journal of Magnetic Residence Imaging, online January 2.

 

Across the entire group, however, whole-brain CBF did not significantly predict fluid cognition, but it did predict follow-up episodic memory in older individuals and in the entire cohort.

 

Frontal lobe CBF best predicted follow-up fluid cognition, episodic memory, and reasoning in the older group, whereas frontal lobe CBF was only predictive of episodic memory in the entire cohort.

 

In contrast, baseline CBF in the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes was not predictive of any cognitive domains at follow-up.

 

Changes in reasoning ability between baseline and follow-up were dependent on parietal CBF in the older group and whole-brain CBF in the entire group, but there were no other associations between lobar CBF and changes in cognitive functions.

 

“The significance of these findings is that physicians can use some of these measures, including blood flow but also other complementary measures such as amyloid imaging, to identify which of their patients have higher risks for cognitive decline,” Dr. Lu said.

 

“They can then determine the best intervention or treatment strategies for each patient. The physicians can also use these measures to select the best candidates for novel therapies such as those undergoing clinical trials,” he said.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.