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Diet, Exercise Combined Can Improve Blood Circulation in The Brain

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New research suggests that losing weight through diet and exercise could help improve blood circulation in the brains of older adults with type 2 diabetes, which can also help improve cognitive functioning.

Type 2 diabetes can affect blood circulation by stiffening blood vessels and reducing the amount of oxygen that circulates throughout the body, including the brain, which can affect the way we think and make decisions.

Cognitive problems have also been linked to being overweight and obese, conditions that are common for those with type 2 diabetes.

Although lowering calorie intake and increasing physical activity are already known to reduce the negative effects of type 2 diabetes on the body, the effect on the brain has so far been unclear.

To research a possible connection, the team behind the new study looked at information from a 10-year-long study called Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD).

As the study teaches participants to implement healthy, long-term lifestyle changes, the researchers were able to focus in on whether participants with type 2 diabetes — who made their lifestyles healthier by eating fewer calories and increasing their physical activity — had better blood flow to the brain.

They looked at 310 overweight or obese participants taking part in the study, aged 45 to 76 and with type 2 diabetes, and assigned the participants to two groups.

In the first group, participants were given a daily goal of eating between 1200 to 1800 calories in order to lose weight, based on their initial weight.

They also had a goal of partaking in 175 minutes of physical activity throughout the week through activities such as brisk walking.

The second group acted as a control group, who instead of following a diet and exercise plan attended Diabetes Support and Education classes.

During the study, the participants all had their mental functions tested, including their verbal learning, memory, decision-making ability, and other cognitive functions, and around ten years after the start of the study completed an MRI brain scan.

The team found that those who made the healthy lifestyle changes of eating fewer calories and increasing their physical activity had greater blood flow in the brain.

The results also suggested that the lifestyle changes were more effective in increasing or maintaining blood flow in the brain for individuals who were overweight but not obese.

However, the team still concluded that for all participants, whether overweight or obese, long-term weight loss through diet and exercise is beneficial in increasing brain flow in those with type 2 diabetes.

The researchers published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.



Reference: https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/277528/diet-exercise-combined-can-improve-blood-circulation-in-the-brain-of-type-2-diabetes-patients/#ixzz5lDytsUP3 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Did you know that you can have a 20 year old brain At 80?

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Stats are greatly against us. On average, by the age of 70 our brain will be 15% lighter than it was in our 20s, beginning to deteriorate with aging damage in our 30s. Fifty is considered the new 30 in modern anti-aging circles. But when brain cell power yields way to younger ones as a result of age-related oxidation, cell death, plaque buildup, impaired blood flow, energy loss and other environmental and biochemical assaults, 50 becomes, well, just plain old. And depressing.

Brain cells don’t divide unlike those of the skin and other tissues. Generally, when cells divide and are in prime health, repair genes can actually make the next division healthier. The progenitor cells die off, too, leaving only the healthier nuclei of new cells behind. The cerebral cells simply have no second chance; they can’t improve their lot through the usual method. Damage control is more difficult and much more necessary.

Especially in older populations, dementia occurs in tandem with depression, leading scientists to surmise midlife blues are a form of brain damage.

The co-occurrence of depression and cognitive impairment doubles every five years after age 70, and by the time one is 85, the chances are 25% that one will be afflicted with depression and cognitive impairment that will adversely impact one’s life, say Guy G. Potter, PhD of the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina and David C. Steffens, MD, of the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. “Depression is primarily a mood disorder, but it can also be viewed as a cognitive disorder for many older adults, they add.

Reference: http://www.healthylivingmagazine.us/Articles/539/

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.


The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Improved Microcirculation Against Diabetes, Stroke and Several Other Diseases

Exercise has been shown to protect against diabetes, stroke and several other diseases and to improve our moods.

But does it also make us more likely to engage in other activities? Do people who exercise tend to have better social lives or achieve more of their goals?

All clinical evidence so far validates that the science of exercise physiology best explains the outsized and unmatched vast health benefits of D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) and opens up entirely new ways of thinking about the treatment of the underlying causes of the most severe and widespread medical conditions.

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Cerebral Blood Flow Predicts Later Cognitive Function in Older Individuals

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

NEW YORK—Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in healthy older people predicts cognitive function four years later, according to results from an arterial-spin-labeling perfusion-MRI study.

“Specifically, we found that brain blood flow measured at the present time can predict a person’s general cognitive ability and, most significantly, memory function,” Dr. Hanzhang Lu from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, Maryland, told Reuters Health by email. “Across different brain regions we studied, we found that the frontal lobe is the most important in determining future cognitive function.”

Cognitive abilities decline with age starting from the third decade of life, with the greatest effects on fluid cognition (related to performing tasks). Neuroimaging studies have shown that both brain structure and function deteriorate with age. It remains to be seen, however, whether a particular biomarker can predict future cognitive performance.

Dr. Lu’s team examined the relationship between CBF and cognitive function among 309 participants aged 20 to 89 years in the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study.

At the year four follow-up, all participants remained free of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, but there were age-related decreases in CBF and cognition. Participants who were older at baseline experienced faster declines in cognitive function, compared with younger subjects.

Among participants who were 54 years or older at baseline, higher whole-brain CBF at baseline significantly predicted better fluid cognition (a construct of processing speed, working memory, reasoning, and episodic memory) four years later, the team reports in the Journal of Magnetic Residence Imaging, online January 2.

Across the entire group, however, whole-brain CBF did not significantly predict fluid cognition, but it did predict follow-up episodic memory in older individuals and in the entire cohort.

Frontal lobe CBF best predicted follow-up fluid cognition, episodic memory, and reasoning in the older group, whereas frontal lobe CBF was only predictive of episodic memory in the entire cohort.

In contrast, baseline CBF in the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes was not predictive of any cognitive domains at follow-up.

Changes in reasoning ability between baseline and follow-up were dependent on parietal CBF in the older group and whole-brain CBF in the entire group, but there were no other associations between lobar CBF and changes in cognitive functions.

“The significance of these findings is that physicians can use some of these measures, including blood flow but also other complementary measures such as amyloid imaging, to identify which of their patients have higher risks for cognitive decline,” Dr. Lu said.

“They can then determine the best intervention or treatment strategies for each patient. The physicians can also use these measures to select the best candidates for novel therapies such as those undergoing clinical trials,” he said.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.