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This One Thing Makes You Twice as Likely to Die from Coronavirus

diabetes on covid

One pre-existing condition doubles your chances of death. Since the first cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, health experts have been attempting to determine why exactly, becoming infected with the virus proves deadly for some, while others show mild or even no symptoms. Over the last several months, they have pinpointed a variety of risk factors, ranging from age to heart health.

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Now, according to researchers from the NHS and Imperial College London, there is another preexisting condition that can heavily influence your death risk if infected with the coronavirus. Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.


Obese People Are Twice as Likely to Die From COVID-19


One study claims that people who suffer from the coronavirus who have Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—are twice as likely to die than those who do not suffer from diabetes. Those with Type 1 diabetes—the autoimmune form of diabetes—fare worse if infected. According to the study they are more than three-and-a-half times more likely to die. In total, researchers found that one-third of all COVID-19 deaths have one thing in common—diabetes.

Furthermore, those who are also severely obese, with a body mass index (BMI) above 40, are twice as likely to die than those who were obese or normal weight.

“This research shows the extent of the risk of coronavirus for people with diabetes and the different risks for those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes,” Prof Jonathan Valabhji, NHS England’s national clinical director for diabetes and obesity and the study’s lead author, said. “Importantly, it also shows that higher blood glucose levels and obesity further increase the risk in both types of diabetes.”

In other words, lifestyle choices can strongly influence your death risk when it comes to the highly infectious virus. 

“This can be worrying news but we would like to reassure people that the NHS is here for anyone with concerns about diabetes—and has put extra measures in place to help people and keep them safe, including online sites to support people to care for themselves, digital consultations, and a dedicated new helpline for advice and support for people treated with insulin.

But You Can “Prevent or Delay” It


A previous study conducted by researchers at Wuhan Union Hospital published in the journal Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews, established a link between people with diabetes who contract COVID-19, and severe illness. Researchers found that patients who had diabetes but no other serious health problems were “more susceptible to an inflammatory storm eventually leading to rapid deterioration of COVID‐19.” This being at a “higher risk of severe pneumonia, release of tissue injury-related enzymes, excessive uncontrolled inflammation responses, and dysregulation of glucose metabolism” compared to patients without diabetes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 34.2 million people of all ages—or 10.5% of the US population—have diabetes. The percentage of adults with diabetes increases with age, reaching 26.8% among those aged 65 years or older. The government health agency also points out that you can “prevent or delay” Type 2 diabetes even if you are genetically predisposed and at high risk via “proven, achievable lifestyle changes.” As for yourself: to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

Approximately 30 percent of diabetes patients suffer nerve damage. One cause of this is impaired nerve cell metabolism due to high blood sugar levels. Another factor is reduced oxygen supply to the nerve cells due to the damaged microvessels supplying them. The most evident consequences are abnormal sensations like tingling, burning pain or numbness, especially in the hands and feet.

In addition, tactile and temperature sensations, as well as pain perception, may be reduced. This latter factor favours the development of diabetic foot syndrome since wounds are not noticed in early stages and – also due to impaired microcirculation – heal poorly.

According to Dr. Michael McGlamry of Forsyth Foot and Ankle Associates, Cumming, GA, D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is a groundbreaking noninvasive, painless transdermal delivery system based on widely established, groundbreaking, Nobel Prize-winning science and is shown to increase oxygen-rich blood flow in the local microcirculatory system, which in turn leads to better blood perfusion and tissue oxygenation. The increased peripheral perfusion plays a significant role in enhancing the wound healing process, which may lead to a reduction in the influence of preexisting conditions in cases of a coronavirus infection.

D’OXYVA has shown significant promise for severe cases of diabetic foot ulcers. Its therapeutic effects have circulatory and neurological benefits as well.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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While coronavirus vaccines race ahead, our treatment options remain mediocre. There are good reasons for that.

Just a year into the pandemic, three vaccines have already been found to protect people from coronavirus infection – the fastest vaccine development process in history by at least four years. The US public will likely start getting shots within weeks.

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In the last month, Pfizer Moderna, and AstraZeneca have all announced that their coronavirus vaccine candidates were found to be effective in trials.

Meanwhile, none of the drugs we have for COVID-19 so far are particularly effective.

Experts cite several reasons why: Vaccines have received far more funding due to their potential to stop the pandemic, and they’re easier to test in large studies.

Yet for people who get sick, treatment options are still far from perfect.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved one coronavirus treatment and authorized five others. But for severely ill patients, only one therapy – steroids – has been found to definitively reduce death rates.

The therapies authorized for less-serious COVID-19 cases, meanwhile, all belong to the same family: monoclonal antibodies. While promising, these treatments are expensive, difficult to manufacture, and haven’t yet demonstrated efficacy in large trials.

There are several reasons our vaccine options have outstripped treatments. The first is cost-effectiveness: While vaccines are expensive and time-consuming to develop, they have the potential to stop the pandemic. Treatments only help those already sick, so are less valuable to governments overall.

“I’m not surprised that there’s been more aggressive funding to work with vaccines, because I think, in the end, that’s how we’re going to turn the tide on this,” Taison Bell, an infectious-disease physician at the University of Virginia, told Business Insider.

text: A vial of remdesivir is pictured during a news conference at the University Hospital Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany, April 8, 2020. Ulrich Perrey/Reuters

Additionally, researchers can conduct vaccine trials on tens of thousands of healthy volunteers, whereas studies about treatments require thousands of sick patients.

And finally, treatments are notoriously difficult to develop for viruses, especially respiratory ones. Scientists have been trying, and failing, to find effective treatments for rhinoviruses – which cause most common colds – since the 1950s.

The juxtaposition was stark: In the same mid-November week, Moderna announced that its vaccine was found to be 94.5% effective, and the World Health Organization announced that it won’t recommend the antiviral drug remdesivir, since it hasn’t been found to lower mortality rates. 

Remdesivir is the only coronavirus treatment the FDA has formally approved. Although some studies show it can shorten hospital stays for seriously ill patients, it doesn’t appear to reduce the incidence of death. It’s also expensive, at $2,340 for a standard course.

The FDA has granted emergency authorization to six other coronavirus treatments, including convalescent plasma, corticosteroids, and hydroxychloroquine, though the agency then revoked hydroxychloroquine’s authorization in June.

The most recent drug to get FDA authorization, the monoclonal antibody therapy bamlanivimab, targets the coronavirus’ spike protein to block its entry into cells. But the treatment does not appear to benefit hospitalized patients, according to studies.

“These are sort of things that move the bar a little bit, but none of these are game-changers,” Bell said.

Monoclonal antibody treatments are also hard to manufacture and distribute, according to Bell: They can take up to two weeks to produce in a complex process that can require 10 distinct steps.

Corticosteroids, meanwhile, can lower death rates, and they’re cheap: A standard treatment course of the steroid dexamethasone will likely cost between $10 and $13, according to Michael Rea, the CEO of Rx Savings Solutions. But steroids can have damaging side effects and even make patients vulnerable to other infections, which is why they’re only authorized for patients with severe COVID-19.

a hand holding a blue and white shirt: The world’s eyes are trained on the few companies coming forward with vaccines for coronavirus, but with companies like Pfizer and Moderna getting very close to releasing theirs to the public, and others like Johnson & Johnson’s being paused due to an unexplained illness just when it was starting to gain traction, the question mark around people’s trust in vaccines continues to grow.Besides the conspiracy theories that companies are trying to put chips in humans, or the repeatedly disproved theories that vaccines cause autism, people are concerned about the speed with which these new vaccines are being created, and much of the fear around them comes from not fully understanding how they work. And that goes for vaccines of all sorts!So, click through to read about how regular vaccines work, how COVID-19 vaccines are developing, and what the new RNA technology means for our immunization and the (hopeful) end of this pandemic.

Viruses are hard to treat

Viruses are simply more difficult to target with medications than other illnesses, Bell said.

“Viruses, for the most part, operate inside of our body’s cells, which is much harder to target than, say, bacteria, where most live outside of our body cells and are more readily attacked by antibiotics,” he explained. 

Plus, studies of new treatments generally require large numbers of sick patients, whereas vaccine studies can just give shots to healthy volunteers then see who gets sick. Most treatment studies are also messier, since many patients in hospitals often get combinations of different therapies.

Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association, said that although it’s unfortunate so many people have gotten COVID-19, the sheer number of patients has accelerated medical researchers’ ability to figure out how best to help people. 

“Right now, the medical industry, or healthcare system, has learned a lot more about how to treat patients,” he told Business Insider.

Doctors have learned to avoid ventilators when possible, monitor blood-oxygen levels of high-risk patients, and administer treatments when they’re most effective in the course of an illness, he explained. 

a person standing in front of a building: Medical staff wearing full PPE push a stretcher with a deceased patient to a car outside of the COVID-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Vaccines spur the body to annihilate viruses

Vaccines train the body’s own immune system to kill a virus before it can enter too many cells. 

Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines are each than 94% effective, and AstraZeneca’s candidate seems to be 70% effective, on average. Pfizer plans to send out 6.4 million doses of its vaccine within 24 hours of getting regulatory clearance, which could happen by mid-December. Moderna expects to have between 100 and 125 million doses ready in the first quarter of 2021, and 20 million doses in the US by the end of the year.

All three vaccine candidates got some degree of financial backing from Operation Warp Speed, which aims to produce and distribute 300 million vaccine doses in the US by January. The program has awarded more than $12 billion in contracts to spur the rapid development and testing of eight primary vaccine candidates.

But it has only funded three treatments, all of them monoclonal antibodies.

Capped vials used during filling and packaging tests for the large-scale production of AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine candidate. VINCENZO PINTO/AFP via Getty Images

Vaccines offer ‘the most benefit for the dollar spent’

The dizzying speed of coronavirus vaccine development is not cause for alarm, according to Rizzo.

“We’re not skipping steps – we actually have better technology,” he said, citing advances in genetic sequencing and mRNA technology. “It’s like saying, why did it take two weeks to cross the Atlantic back in the 1800s? Well, we had to go on a boat. Whereas now you can get across the ocean in several hours.”

Given that, experts say, drugs simply deliver less value than vaccines. 

“If I was controlling funding and trying to divert the resources where I think I would get the most benefit for the dollar spent, I would actually develop it towards vaccines,” Bell said. 

Rizzo said he is looking forward to more research on several other possible therapies, though. One, infliximab, may help keep the immune system from overreacting to coronavirus. A September article in The Lancet Rheumatology suggested the drug could “have a major impact on the need for ventilation and mortality.”

Baricitinib could also be found to significantly reducing mortality for people with serious cases of COVID-19 once larger trials are conducted. A small, early study found that 17% of patients given the drug died or needed a ventilator, compared with 35% in the control group.

Still, researchers haven’t found a drug that’s cheap, easy to distribute, and meaningfully improves outcomes for patients with less severe symptoms. 

“All things considered, I’m most happy that we have multiple vaccine candidates at this point,” Bell said.

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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We have bad news about one of the most promising new coronavirus drugs

coronavirus vaccine

New coronavirus cases are surging yet again, and thousands of people are dying every week. But the world has come a long way since the early days of the pandemic when it comes to treatments. The virus is spreading like wildfire, as many people are failing to observe the safety measures that can reduce transmission. The more people get infected, the more people will die. But doctors are able to save more lives than before thanks to some therapies that can prevent COVID-19 complications and speed up recovery.

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  • A promising drug being developed to treat COVID-19 failed to show efficacy with severe coronavirus cases.
  • Eli Lilly announced that it has terminated a study evaluating the efficacy of the monoclonal antibody drug in hospitalized patients.
  • ”Bamlanivimab [LY-CoV555] is unlikely to help hospitalized COVID-19 patients recover from this advanced stage of their disease,” the company said in its announcement.
  • Lilly continues to study the drug in other trials and has already requested an emergency use authorization to treat mild to moderate cases of COVID-19.

In search of a coronavirus cure, researchers have taken one of the three possible avenues. Some came up with vaccine candidates, and a vaccine might be available to at-risk people by the end of the year. Others repurposed existing drugs for COVID-19 — remdesivir, dexamethasone, and blood thinners are examples that have shown a degree of efficacy. And others are developing brand new drugs, including a type of medicine that should work quite well against the new pathogen. Those are the monoclonal antibody drugs that act much like a very potent plasma transfusion, offering the recipient a high dose of neutralizing antibodies that should block the virus from infecting cells. Monoclonal antibodies can clear the virus or even theoretically provide temporary coronavirus immunity to healthy people. But as promising as these drugs might sound, we’ve just learned they have limitations, and they might not work in the cases that matter most.

Several companies are working on antibody drugs around the world, but two of them are better known than others. Regeneron has a two-antibody cocktail that President Trump received during his COVID-19 recovery. The company has already applied for emergency use authorization (EUA) with the FDA. Eli Lilly is the second, as the company also applied for an EUA even before Regeneron’s announcement. But Eli Lilly revealed a few days ago that it had to halt one of the clinical trials it’s conducting because of a mysterious side effect that wasn’t detailed to the press. The study was paused out of “an abundance of caution” on October 13th.

The National Institutes of Health, a sponsor of the trial, said on Monday that the antibody treatment posed no significant safety risk for patients, according to NPR. But Eli Lilly researchers concluded that the drug couldn’t help patients who are already experiencing severe COVID-19 complications. ”Bamlanivimab [the LY-CoV555 monoclonal antibody] is unlikely to help hospitalized COVID-19 patients recover from this advanced stage of their disease,” the company said.

Lilly combined the drug with remdesivir for this particular stage of the trial. President Trump received a similar combination of meds when he had COVID-19 a few weeks ago. However, Trump got the Regeneron cocktail first before he received the remdesivir regimen, and he also wasn’t experiencing any severe complications at the time.

This particular Lilly trial has been terminated, in what seems to be an unexpected blow for this particular COVID-19 therapy. However, we’ve seen other therapies fail in trials, including hydroxychloroquine, tocilizumab, and lopinavir/ritonavir. Most recently, the World Health Organization concluded that remdesivir can’t prevent COVID-19 deaths. But other studies show that the antiviral can be helpful if administered early in the illness. Furthermore, the plasma studies available so far also showed they could benefit patients if transfusions are rich in potent antibodies, and if they’re administered soon after hospitalization. All hope is not lost because the same might apply to Eli Lilly’s monoclonal antibody drug — it could prove to be a very effective COVID-19 therapy when administered early on.

Lilly will continue to run other trials. The company remains “confident … that bamlanivimab monotherapy may prevent progression of the disease for those earlier in the course of COVID-19.” While Lilly’s ACTIV-3 trial was halted, the various other studies might yield better results. The company already used data from a study of non-hospitalized patients with mild COVID-19 (BLAZE-1) to request EUA to treat mild to moderate illnesses in high-risk patients.

While Eli Lilly failed to prove the drug’s efficacy against severe COVID-19 cases, other monoclonal antibody studies might have different results. All the companies developing monoclonal antibody drugs for COVID-19 make use of different antibodies as well as various antibody combinations.

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Beyond a strong clinical evidence demonstrating massive improvements in blood and tissue oxygenation with blood flow throughout the macro-, and microcirculatory system while significantly improving heart rate variability amongst other inflammatory markers, our existing and new customers who purchase our products on our eCommerce non-prescription website continue to enjoy the amazing health benefits our noninvasive products deliver on four continents.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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Southeast Asia Detects Mutated Virus Strain Sweeping the World

Southeast Asia is facing a strain of the new coronavirus that the Philippines, which faces the region’s largest outbreak, is studying to see whether the mutation makes it more infectious. 

The strain, earlier seen in other parts of the world and called D614G, was found in a Malaysian cluster of 45 cases that started from someone who returned from India and breached his 14-day home quarantine. The Philippines detected the strain among random Covid-19 samples in the largest city of its capital region.

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The mutation “is said to have a higher possibility of transmission or infectiousness, but we still don’t have enough solid evidence to say that that will happen,” Philippines’ Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire said in a virtual briefing on Monday.

The strain has been found in many other countries and has become the predominant variant in Europe and the U.S., with the World Health Organization saying there’s no evidence the strain leads to a more severe disease. The mutation has also been detected in recent outbreaks in China.

There’s no evidence from the epidemiology that the mutation is considerably more infectious than other strains, said Benjamin Cowling, head of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Hong Kong. “It’s more commonly identified now than it was in the past, which suggests that it might have some kind of competitive advantage over other strains of Covid-19,” he said.

As Southeast Asian countries take various steps to prevent a resurgence while reopening limited travel, they struggle with people breaching quarantine rules after returning from overseas as well as false negative test results at borders.

The man who returned from India had tested negative when he arrived in Malaysia. He has since been sentenced to five months in prison and fined for breaching quarantine.

People’s Cooperation

“People need to be wary and take greater precautions because this strain has now been found in Malaysia,” the country’s Director-General of Health Noor Hisham Abdullah wrote in a Facebook post, saying the strain can make it 10 times more infectious without citing a study. “The people’s cooperation is very needed so that we can together break the chain of infection from any mutation.”

The strain “might be a little bit more contagious. We haven’t yet got enough evidence to evaluate that, but there’s no evidence that it’s a lot more contagious,” University of Hong Kong’s Cowling said.

Noor Hisham warned that the strain could mean existing studies on vaccines may be incomplete or ineffective against the mutation. That’s even as a paper published in Cell Press said the mutation is unlikely to have a major impact on the efficacy of vaccines currently being developed.

While Malaysia has largely managed to prevent a resurgence of the virus seen elsewhere in the world, the number of new cases found in the country has been picking up. The country reported 26 new cases on Saturday, the most since July 28.

Confirmed cases in the Philippines have surged 76% from the end of July to a total of 164,474 as of Monday. It overtook Indonesia more than a week ago to become the country with the largest outbreak in Southeast Asia.

— With assistance by Clarissa Batino, and Jason Gale

physician-recommended easy to use daily

Why Use D'OXYVA?

Experts say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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About 47% of US adults have at least one underlying medical condition that may put them at a higher risk for severe Covid-19 outcomes, according to a new CDC report published Thursday.

Older adults and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity are at higher risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness.

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What is added by this report?

The median model-based estimate of the prevalence of any of five underlying medical conditions associated with increased risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness among U.S. adults was 47.2% among 3,142 U.S. counties. The estimated number of persons with these conditions followed population distributions, but prevalence was higher in more rural counties.

What are the implications for public health practice?

The findings can help local decision-makers identify areas at higher risk for severe COVID-19 illness in their jurisdictions and guide resource allocation and implementation of community mitigation strategies.

Risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)–associated illness (illness requiring hospitalization, intensive care unit [ICU] admission, mechanical ventilation, or resulting in death) increases with increasing age as well as presence of underlying medical conditions that have shown strong and consistent evidence, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity (14). Identifying and describing the prevalence of these conditions at the local level can help guide decision-making and efforts to prevent or control severe COVID-19–associated illness. Below state-level estimates, there is a lack of standardized publicly available data on underlying medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness. A small area estimation approach was used to estimate county-level prevalence of selected conditions associated with severe COVID-19 disease among U.S. adults aged ≥18 years (5,6) using self-reported data from the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and U.S. Census population data. The median prevalence of any underlying medical condition in residents among 3,142 counties in all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) was 47.2% (range = 22.0%–66.2%); counties with the highest prevalence were concentrated in the Southeast and Appalachian region. Whereas the estimated number of persons with any underlying medical condition was higher in population-dense metropolitan areas, overall prevalence was higher in rural nonmetropolitan areas. These data can provide important local-level information about the estimated number and proportion of persons with certain underlying medical conditions to help guide decisions regarding additional resource investment, and mitigation and prevention measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.

BRFSS is an annual, random-digit–dialed landline and mobile telephone survey of noninstitutionalized U.S. adults aged ≥18 years in all 50 states, DC, and U.S. territories. BRFSS collects self-reported information on selected health behaviors and conditions. Overall, 437,500 persons participated in the 2018 BRFSS survey, with a median weighted response rate of 49.9%.*

The underlying medical conditions included in these prevalence estimates were selected using the subset of the list of conditions with the strongest and most consistent evidence of association with higher risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness on CDC’s website as of June 25, 2020 (2) and for which questions on the BRFSS aligned. These included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart conditions, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and obesity (defined as body mass index [BMI] of ≥30 kg per m2). Conditions from the list of those with mixed and limited evidence§ of association with increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness were not included (2). An analysis of U.S. COVID-19 patient surveillance data found that hospitalizations were six times higher, ICU admissions five times higher, and deaths 12 times higher among patients with underlying medical conditions, compared with those without (4); however, that analysis included a narrower definition of obesity (BMI ≥40 kg per m2), and some, but not all conditions in both the strongest and most consistent evidence and mixed and limited evidence lists.

BRFSS respondents were classified as having an underlying medical condition if they answered “yes” to any of the following questions: “Have you ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that you have COPD, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis; heart disease (angina or coronary heart disease, heart attack, or myocardial infarction); diabetes; or chronic kidney disease?” Respondent-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI; respondents with BMI ≥30 kg per m2 were considered to have obesity. A created variable captured persons having any of these conditions.

Nationwide estimates of underlying medical conditions were weighted to adjust for survey design. For county-level prevalence, estimates of each and of any condition were generated using a multilevel regression and poststratification approach (5) for 3,142 counties in all 50 states and DC. This approach has been validated in comparison with direct BRFSS survey estimates and local surveys for multiple chronic disease measures at state and county levels (5,6). Briefly, a multilevel regression model was constructed for each outcome using individual-level age, gender, race/ethnicity,** and educational-level†† data from the 2018 BRFSS, and data on county-level percentage of the adult population living at <150% of the poverty level from the 2014–2018 American Community Survey (ACS), a survey sent to about 3.5 million addresses each month that asks about topics not included on the decennial census, including education and employment. The model parameters were applied to 2018 Census county-level population estimates by age, gender, and race/ethnicity to calculate the predicted probability of each outcome. Because the U.S. Census Bureau does not provide county-level population data for education level by age, sex, and race/ethnicity, a bootstrapping approach§§ was used to impute it. The estimated prevalence was obtained by multiplying the probability by the total population by county. Model-based estimates for any condition were validated by comparing them with the weighted direct survey estimates from counties with sample size ≥500 (213) in BRFSS; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.89. The county-level estimates of having any underlying medical condition were categorized into six county urban/rural classifications using CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics definitions (large central metro/city, large fringe metro/suburb, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan, noncore/rural) (7). The overall weighted direct survey estimates were conducted using SUDAAN (version 11; RTI International), and other analyses were conducted using SAS (version 9.4; SAS Institute).

The nationwide prevalence of any of the five underlying medical conditions among adults aged ≥18 years was 40.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 40.4%–41.0%) (Table 1). The overall weighted prevalences of these conditions were 30.9% (obesity), 11.4% (diabetes), 6.9% (COPD), 6.8% (heart disease), and 3.1% (CKD).

TABLE 1. Nationwide and model-based county-level (n = 3,142) estimates of prevalence and number of adults aged ≥18 years with selected underlying medical conditions that might increase risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness — United States, 2018Return to your place in the text
Selected underlying medical condition*Nationwide prevalence % (95% CI)Median county prevalence§ % (range)Median county no. of adults (range)
Any40.7 (40.4, 41.0)47.2 (22.0–66.2)9,743 (41–2,877,316)
Obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2)30.9 (30.6, 31.2)35.4 (15.2– 49.9)7,174 (25–2,097,906)
Diabetes mellitus11.4 (11.2, 11.6)12.8 (6.1–25.6)2,742 (11–952,335)
COPD6.9 (6.7, 7.0)8.9 (3.5–19.9)1,962 (7–434, 075)
Heart disease6.8 (6.7, 7.0)8.6 (3.5–15.1)1, 811 (7–434,790)
Chronic kidney disease3.1 (3.0, 3.3)3.4 (1.8–6.2)717 (3–237,766)

Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index; CI = confidence interval; COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; COVID-19 = coronavirus disease 2019.
* Diabetes mellitus includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. COPD includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Heart disease includes angina or coronary heart disease, and heart attack or myocardial infarction.
 Weighted direct estimates from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.
§ Prevalence and number of adults estimated for 3,142 counties using a multilevel regression and poststratification approach applied to 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data.

 

Among 3,142 counties, the median estimated (modeled) county prevalence of any underlying medical condition was 47.2% (range = 22.0%–66.2%); obesity, 35.4% (range = 15.2%–49.9%); diabetes, 12.8% (range = 6.1%–25.6%); COPD, 8.9% (range = 3.5%–19.9%); heart disease, 8.6% (range = 3.5%–15.1%); and CKD, 3.4% (range = 1.8%–6.2%) (Table 1).

Counties with the highest prevalences of any condition were concentrated in Southeastern states, particularly in Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and West Virginia, as well as some counties in Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and northern Michigan, among others (Figure) (Supplementary Table, https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/90519). The estimated number of adults with any condition generally followed the population distribution, with higher estimated numbers of persons with any underlying medical conditions in more highly populated areas.

FIGUREModel-based estimates of U.S. prevalence (A) and number (B) of adults aged ≥18 years with any selected underlying medical condition,* by county — United States, 2018

The figure is map showing model-based estimates of U.S. prevalence (A) and number (B) of adults aged ≥18 years with any selected underlying medical condition, by county, in the United States, in 2018.

* Selected underlying conditions include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis; heart disease (angina or coronary heart disease, heart attack, or myocardial infarction); diabetes; chronic kidney disease; or obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2).

The estimated median prevalence of any condition generally increased with increasing rurality, ranging from 39.4% in large central metro counties to 48.8% in noncore counties (Table 2); the estimated median number of persons with any underlying condition ranged from 4,300 in noncore counties to 301,744 in large central metro counties.

TABLE 2. Model-based estimates of prevalence and number of persons aged ≥18 years with any select underlying medical condition, by urban/rural county classification — United States, 2018Return to your place in the text
County classification*No. of countiesMedian county prevalence % (range)Median county no. of persons (range)
Metropolitan
Large central metro6839.4 (23.9–48.1)301,744 (43,770–2,877,316)
Large fringe metro§36843.9 (26.4–56.9)34,221 (1,611–725,284)
Medium metro37245.5 (22.0–61.7)33,687 (659–332,209)
Small metro**35845.8 (27.8–62.2)26,683 (41–87,153)
Nonmetropolitan
Micropolitan††64147.8 (24.3–64.6)13,979 (176–59,820)
Noncore§§1,33548.8 (26.8–66.2)4,300 (47–29,469)

* Based on 2013 Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties from the National Center for Health Statistics, CDC.
 Large central metro counties in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) of 1 million population that 1) contain the entire population of the largest principal city of the MSA, or 2) are completely contained within the largest principal city of the MSA, or 3) contain ≥250,000 residents of any principal city in the MSA.
§ Large fringe metro counties in MSA of ≥1 million population that do not qualify as large central.
 Medium metro counties in MSA of 250,000–999,999 population.
** Small metro counties are counties in MSAs of <250,000 population.
†† Micropolitan counties in MSAs.
§§ Noncore counties not in MSAs.

Discussion

Three recent studies have reported that underlying medical conditions are highly prevalent among U.S. COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization and ICU admission (3,4,8). In this report, the median county prevalence of any of five underlying medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness was 47.2%, and prevalences were higher in counties in the southeastern United States and in more rural counties. These county level estimates can be used together with data on hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ventilator use among COVID-19 patients with underlying conditions when planning for mitigation efforts and additional resource investment, including hospital beds, staffing, ventilators, and other medical supplies that might be needed to treat persons with underlying medical conditions, should they become ill with COVID-19.

The percentage of the population (prevalence) and the estimated numbers of adults with underlying medical conditions provide information for planning and have implications for health care resource utilization. Areas with comparatively lower prevalences but large populations, such as metropolitan areas, might still have large numbers of persons with underlying medical conditions at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness. Conversely, areas with smaller populations but a comparatively higher prevalence of persons with underlying medical conditions might also have substantial need for additional resources to treat severe COVID-19 illness. Health care in rural counties is often underresourced,¶¶ and rural communities might have limited access to adequate care, which could further increase risk for poor COVID-19–associated outcomes. Prevalence estimates help highlight counties with a higher relative need for resources, whereas estimates of numbers of persons with underlying medical conditions help identify overall need by county; both can help decision-makers predict resource needs and develop resource allocation plans.

The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, estimates were based on BRFSS data and subject to survey biases such as nonresponse, social desirability, and recall and knowledge of having a particular condition. Second, BRFSS data do not include all underlying medical conditions that might increase risk for severe COVID-19 illness, such as sickle cell disease, or information on organ transplant or disease severity. Third, some of the underlying medical conditions included in BRFSS might not exactly capture those conditions with the strongest and most consistent evidence such as specific heart conditions (e.g., cardiomyopathies and heart failure) or specific type of diabetes. Further, because COVID-19 is a novel disease and information regarding risk factors for severe illness is evolving, additional underlying medical conditions might be added in the future (as an example, cancer was added to the list after these analyses were conducted). Fourth, BRFSS data are collected for noninstitutionalized civilian persons and exclude populations that might be particularly vulnerable to severe COVID-19 illness, including those living in long-term care facilities and incarcerated populations, and might therefore not be representative for those groups. Finally, these estimates might be imprecise because of the multilevel regression modeling process and county-level population estimation.

These findings can be used by state and local decision-makers to help identify areas at higher risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness because of underlying medical conditions and guide resource allocation and implementation of prevention and mitigation strategies. Future analyses could include weighting the contribution of each underlying medical condition according to the risk for severe COVID-19–associated outcomes, as well as identifying and incorporating other aspects of vulnerability to both infection and severe outcomes to better estimate the number of persons at increased risk for COVID-19. These findings highlight the prevalence of underlying medical conditions at the local (county) level that are important causes of morbidity and mortality on their own and increase risk for severe COVID-19–associated illness. These findings also emphasize the importance of prevention efforts to reduce the prevalence of these underlying medical conditions and their risk factors such as smoking, unhealthy diet, and lack of physical activity.

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Experts say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a game changer.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

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Covid-19 and the heart: two new studies offer insights

Since the coronavirus pandemic first began, evidence has emerged showing that Covid-19 can damage more than the lungs.

The disease caused by the novel coronavirus can harm other organs in the body — including the heart — and now two separate studies, published in the journal JAMA Cardiology on Monday, provide more insight into how Covid-19 may have a prolonged impact on heart health in those who have recovered from illness and may have caused cardiac infection in those who died.

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“We’ve understood for a few months now that Covid-19 is not only a respiratory infection but a multi-system infection,” said cardiologist Dr. Nieca Goldberg, medical director of the NYU Women’s Heart Program and senior adviser for women’s health strategy at NYU Langone Health in New York, who was not involved in either study.

“There is an acute inflammatory response, increased blood clotting and cardiac involvement. And the cardiac involvement can either be due to direct involvement of the heart muscle by the infection and its inflammatory response. It could be due to blood clots that are formed, causing an obstruction of arteries,” Goldberg said.

“Sometimes people have very fast heart rates that can, over time, weaken the heart muscle, reduce the heart muscle function. So there are multiple ways during this infection that it can involve the heart.”

 

Inflammation of the heart

One of the JAMA Cardiology studies found that, among 100 adults who recently recovered from Covid, 78% showed some type of cardiac involvement in MRI scans and 60% had ongoing inflammation in the heart.

The study included patients ages 45 to 53 who were from the University Hospital Frankfurt Covid-19 Registry in Germany. They were recruited for the study between April and June. Most of the patients — 67– recovered at home, with the severity of their illness ranging from some being asymptomatic to having moderate symptoms.

The researchers used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, blood tests and biopsy of heart tissue. Those data were compared with a group of 50 healthy volunteers and 57 volunteers with some underlying health conditions or risk factors.

© NIAID-RML his scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (yellow)—also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus that causes COVID-19—isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells (pink) cultured in the lab. Credit: NIAID-RML

The MRI data revealed that people infected with coronavirus had some sort of heart involvement regardless of any preexisting conditions, the severity or course of their infection, the time from their original diagnosis or the presence of any specific heart-related symptoms.

The most common heart-related abnormality in the Covid-19 patients was myocardial inflammation or abnormal inflammation of the heart muscle, which can weaken it.

This type of inflammation, also called myocarditis, is usually caused by a viral infection, Goldberg said, adding that she was not surprised by these study results.

“What they’re saying in this study is that you can identify myocardial involvement or heart involvement by magnetic resonance imaging,” Goldberg said.

The study has some limitations. More research is needed to determine whether similar findings would emerge among a larger group of patients, those younger than 18 and those currently battling coronavirus infection instead of just recovering from it.

“These findings indicate the need for ongoing investigation of the long-term cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19,” the researchers wrote.

‘This infection does not follow one path’

In the other JAMA Cardiology study, an analysis of autopsies found that coronavirus could be identified in the heart tissue of Covid-19 patients who died.

The study included data from 39 autopsy cases from Germany between April 8 and April 18. The patients, ages 78 to 89, had tested positive for Covid-19 and the researchers analyzed heart tissue from their autopsies.

The researchers found that 16 of the patients had virus in their heart tissue, but did not show signs of unusual sudden inflammation in the heart or myocarditis. It’s not clear what this means, the researchers said.

The sample of autopsy cases was small and the “elderly age of the patients might have influenced the results,” the researchers wrote. More research is needed whether similar findings would emerge among a younger group of patients.

“I think both of these studies are important,” Goldberg said.

“One pretty much shows that the MRI scan can help diagnose the myocardial injury that occurs due to Covid and it was confirmed on biopsy,” she said. “The autopsy study showed us something else that’s interesting — that you can have viral presence but not the acute inflammatory process. So this infection does not follow one path.”

‘An increasingly complex puzzle’

Both studies “add to an increasingly complex puzzle” when it comes to the novel coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2, Dr. Dave Montgomery, founding cardiologist at the PREvent Clinic in Sandy Springs, Georgia, said in an email on Tuesday.

“Taken together the studies support that SARS-CoV-2 does not have to cause clinical myocarditis in order to find the virus in large numbers and the inflammatory response in myocardial tissue. In other words, one can have no or mild symptoms of heart involvement in order to actually cause damage,” said Montgomery, who was not involved in the studies.

“Viruses in general have a way of making their way to organs that are quite remote from the original site of infection. SARS-CoV-2 is no different in this regard,” he said. “What is different is that this virus seems to preferentially affect cardiac cells and the surrounding cells. These studies suggest that the heart can be infected with no clear signs. Personally, in my practice, we have seen similar signs of inflammation, including pericardial effusions,” or fluid around the sac of the heart.

Dr. Clyde Yancy of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Dr. Gregg Fonarow of the University of California, Los Angeles, co-authored an editorial that accompanied the two new studies in the journal JAMA Cardiology on Monday.

“We see the plot thickening and we are inclined to raise a new and very evident concern that cardiomyopathy and heart failure related to COVID-19 may potentially evolve as the natural history of this infection becomes clearer,” Yancy and Fonarow wrote in the editorial.

“We wish not to generate additional anxiety but rather to incite other investigators to carefully examine existing and prospectively collect new data in other populations to con- firm or refute these findings,” they wrote.

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Experts say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA effects throughout the entire body is the solution to the challenges COVID-19 poses to people with underlying medical conditions. It helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a game changer.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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Local woman survived COVID-19, then hit with a nearly $50,000 medical bill

D’OXYVA can save a person from the worst effects of COVID-19 for less than 1/10th of the standard care, according to recent test results.

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“My doctor told me that he almost lost me several times. Having to be in the hospital alone without my children or family to hold my hand was terrible,” said COVID-19 survivor Joycelyn Raine.

57-year-old Joycelyn Raine survived a near-death fight with COVID-19.

“I’m just so thankful that I survived. My doctor said that I’m a miracle. He said that he thought he wouldn’t be having another conversation with you but you are a fighter. Thank God. Out of the thousands of people that had passed due to COVID. The Lord show to keep me here. I am grateful for that,” said Raine.

Raine was diagnosed with COVID-19 on April 5th. She then went to a hospital in Meridian where she spent 30 days getting treated for the virus.

“I was scared. I have faith in God but I was afraid I was dying,” said Raine.

After Raine was discharged on May 24th, she went to a rehab center where she spent an additional two months. A couple of weeks after she returned home, Raine received a $45,000 bill from the hospital

“COVID has been traumatic in my life because it put me in a terrible financial bind. Thank God for county assistance, my church family, and my family. I don’t know how I would have survived,” said Raine.

Raine said her team of supporters saved her life, and you can’t put a price on that.

Raine said her COVID-19 experience was scary and encourages everyone to wear their masks.

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

Experts say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a game changer.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.s

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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Americans being blindsided by medical bills amid COVID-19 pandemic

Odds are you do, considering 61% of Americans say they have experienced these costs that could lead to financial hardship.

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PatientRightsAdvocate.org Founder Cynthia Fisher discusses why the need for price transparency in healthcare has never been more important amid the coronavirus crisis.

physician-recommended easy to use daily

Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

physician-recommended easy to use daily

Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

Posted on Leave a comment

How Boris Kodjoe Is Supporting Black Americans and First Responders During the Pandemic

Boris Kodjoe, the star of ABC’s “Station 19,” is focused on self-care. He loves food but not diets, and says his schedule is too busy to spend hours working out.

“Moderation is key for me,” he said, noting his diet is mostly vegetarian, with no refined sugars. His fitness plan alternates between daily 25-minute interval/resistance training and stretching/mobility routines. He plays tennis some days.

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He and his family started KOFIT, a fitness app to help people introduce healthy habits into their lives.

“In these times of COVID-19, people need support in staying fit and healthy at home,” Kodjoe said. “KOFIT’s physical and mental health tips are simple and effective, and they help out the entire family.”

Nicole Ari Parker, an actress and Kodjoe’s wife, designed performance headbands with black women in mind. Called the GymWrap, the headbands wick away sweat, keeping women’s hair fresh, even during exercise.

“With the GymWrap, women can protect their hairstyles while exercising and staying healthy, yet still be ready to go to work after working out,” Kodjoe said. “We’re hoping men and women realize that adding some healthy habits to your everyday routine will increase your quality of life, even if you start out with five minutes a day.”

Supporting Black Americans

COVID-19 is affecting black Americans at a disproportionately high rate. Kodjoe says the crisis has revealed disadvantages in the community, including pre-existing health conditions and systemic discrepancies in healthcare, education, economic opportunity, social justice, access to healthy nutrition, and more.

Kodjoe and Parker are discussing social justice and equality issues with their two children.

“Nicole and I continue to guide our children through their fears and concerns, their hopes and dreams as we address these subjects, and teach them to speak up and be a part of the solution,” Kodjoe said.

The couple has actively advocated for wearing masks during the COVID-19 pandemic. Parker’s company has been selling masks and donating many to first responders through their #HelpOurHeroes initiative.

“We were inspired by the courage and commitment essential workers and first responders exhibited right from the start, and we wanted to help,” Kodjoe said, explaining they’ve given out more than 500,000 free masks so far and plan to donate more. “Hopefully more people will understand that wearing a mask is not about your personal right but rather your personal commitment to your neighbor’s health.”

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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Actor Jonathan Adams Shares How COVID-19 Disproportionately Affects Black Americans

Actor Jonathan Adams is focused on staying healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic and he wants fellow Black Americans to stay safe, too.  The novel coronavirus has disproportionately affected Black Americans at a higher rate than other races. 

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New data shows Black and Latinx U.S. residents are three times as likely to get coronavirus, compared to their white neighbors. They’re also nearly twice as likely to die from the disease.

Adams, known for playing Chuck Larabee, Tim Allen’s neighbor on ABC’s “Last Man Standing,” has been talking with his family and friends about the pandemic, including with his sister, who is a nurse

“All I can say is that it’s incredibly oppressive and very frightening,” said Adams, who wears masks and tries to stay healthy overall. He exercises every other day, including taking long walks with his dogs.

Socioeconomic issue

Adams says many essential workers like nurses, restaurant workers, bus drivers, and others, are people of color.

“It’s not necessarily a racial thing but I think it’s more a socioeconomic issue that we’re facing,” he said. “And we’re seeing a disparity in the fact that a lot of Black people, and a lot of Latinos as well, don’t have the white collar jobs that we can stay at home and do from home, do from a computer.”

In fact, 2018 Census data shows 43 percent of black and Latinx workers work in service and production jobs, which typically can’t be done remotely.

Black in America

It’s an emotionally challenging time in the United States

“There’s a lot of tension that comes along with just simply being black in America,” said Adams. “And I think that a lot of why we have hypertension is because of the tension of just trying to live in your own skin.”

The American Heart Association says Black Americans have one of the highest rates of hypertension in the world. While people with the condition are encouraged to relax, Adams says that’s hard to do.

“How can you relax when you’re under this constant pressure?” asked Adams, who calls the combined timing of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter “a perfect storm.”

He’s ready for open conversations about these tough topics.

“Honestly, I think everything starts at home, and everything starts with your own family,” Adams said. “It all begins with someone you know, or even a small group of people having those arguments and discussions about this. We just need to hammer it out.”

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physician-recommended easy to use daily

Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

physician-recommended easy to use daily

Why Use D'OXYVA?

Expert say D’OXYVA can help COVID-19 patients find relief. Preliminary medical data shows people with pre-existing conditions including diabetes may experience serious complications from COVID-19.

D’OXYVA helps by delivering transdermal ultra-purified medical gas directly to the blood stream delivering major outcomes for well over 90% of users.

Experts call D’OXYVA a gamechanger.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive woundcare,” Dr. Michael McGlamry.

Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!