Posted on Leave a comment

Innovative Collaboration: The Cutting Edge of Medicine Goes “Behind The Scenes”

LOS ANGELES (PRWEB) DECEMBER 11, 2019

Circularity is partnering with Telly Award-Winning “Behind the Scenes” to provide regular, ongoing, high-quality content from leading experts in a variety of fields with an initial focus on microcirculation science, regenerative medicine, and advanced wound healing and related symptoms. The show reaches 60 million households domestically.

“Behind The Scenes with Host Laurence Fishburne” is a public television icon that has won numerous awards and delivers precision idea-telling at its best. Circularity is an innovative healthcare organization that is health-bent on their trademarked slogan: “Improving Lives by Improving Blood Flow.” Their coming together to bring forward the ideas of modern health science on a stellar entertainment platform can only make for riveting content going forward. Viewers will find themselves in a win-win situation.

Watching informative content via this stylized venue will leave viewers feeling quite satisfied with their television watching experience. It is time well spent and information precisely delivered.

A Little More About Circularity

Circularity is concerned with bringing the very best in healthcare innovation to the public. In so doing, they have manufactured a product called D’OXYVA. This product has a two-pronged approach to health. First, it can be quite effective in reducing the debilitative effects of many of the diseases that are affecting the world today, such as COPD, diabetes, and cardiovascular illnesses. Secondly, Circularity’s D’OXYVA can be used in a preventative capacity to improve microcirculation. The concept of microcirculation has far-reaching implications in neurology, oncology, endocrinology, cardiovascular health, respiratory health, dermatology, diabetic wound healing or diabetic wound care and other major fields.

Circularity Healthcare, LLC is the power behind D’OXYVA. This noninvasive trans-dermal and circulatory health technology is just the first product to be offered. Circularity is invested in revolutionizing the healthcare space. They plan to do this by creating cutting edge medical products and procedures that are both patient and physician friendly while being effective in minimizing and eradicating diseases.

What “Behind The Scenes with Host Laurence Fishburne” Will Bring to the Table

Behind The Scenes has been an innovator in bringing information to the forefront in the public television space. The award-winning series features segments on the newest technologies, as well as fresh takes on existing entities, phenomenon, and natural occurrences. The show’s website boasts that the television series “highlights the evolution of education, medicine, science, technology and industry through inspiring stories.”

Aside from the Emmy-winning and Academy Award nominated actor Lawrence Fishburne as host, the program has an award-winning creative development team. Viewers walk away with a rich knowledge of the subject. Viewers may have known about this subject their whole lives, or it may be about something completely new. Viewers learn an evolving aspect of the topic which keeps the perspective fresh.

The dawning of a new age has appeared with this collaboration. Individuals who want to know more about what the health science field is bringing into our hospitals and doctors’ offices will not be disappointed. In today’s world, it is imperative that we are advocates for our own health.

Coming Soon: Miami ReLife’s Dr. Steven Gelbard

The first series is with Dr. Steven Gelbard, a nationally-famed authority with his ReLife Miami Institute on stem cells. Dr. Gelbard presents D’OXYVA’s Nobel Prize-winning science as a regenerative medicine. Dr. Gelbard is involving his direct contacts with top NFL players and other top sports celebrities in the monthly series, along with 25—40 top neurosurgeons and other experts working under ReLife.

Imagine having the ability to receive D’OXYVA and other innovative treatments and non-invasive procedures for chronic wound care amid the luxury of a five-star hotel. Behind The Scenes guest, Dr. Gelbard, a Tufts School of Medicine educated neurosurgeon, makes it happen right now. Medicine has left the hospital building and has become the proactive choice of the health conscious. We can all look forward to learning more about how to live a healthier and more informed lifestyle from this awe-inspiring episode.

According to Norbert Kiss, President and CEO of Circularity Healthcare, this collaboration is door busting. Mr. Kiss tells us, ”[We] can offer unprecedented access to this amazing Emmy-winning show called Behind the Scenes with very amazing terms due to our strategic involvement. We welcome any expert.”

Laurence Fishburne, host of Behind The Scenes,” beckons, “Join me as we all discover the endless ways to enjoy the skills and imagination.”

Don’t miss the evolution. It’s being televised. Circularity and Behind The Scenes—Stay tuned for a mind-fortifying experience!

Circularity Values:

We, at Circularity believe in a long-sought-after goal in health care; people should have access to one health application that solves most of their short and long term health issues without compromising other aspects of their health while doing this quickly, affordably, and without pain.
Circularity develops, manufactures and markets advanced technologies that significantly improve quality of life by improving some of the most essential physiological functions in the body.

About Behind The Scenes With Laurence Fishburne

Behind The Scenes is an award-winning program that highlights new stories and innovative concepts through groundbreaking short-form and long-form documentary presentation. The program, which is anchored by a veteran production team with decades of industry experience, is able to effectively communicate the most critical stories to a wide and diverse audience.

Behind The Scenes with Laurence Fishburne, has established an impressive and heralded career, amassing over one-hundred credits across the varied platforms of stage, television and film. He’s well known for major for roles in such films as; John Wick 2, Fantastic 4 Rise of the Silver Surfer, Mission Impossible III, Mystic River, Boyz n the Hood, What’s Love Got to Do With It, and Apocalypse Now. On the small screen, the award-winning and versatile actor played compelling roles in shows such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, CSI: Miami, CSI: New York and Hannibal. The Behind The Scenes Actor currently stars as Pops on the hit TV comedy Black-ish.

About Circularity Healthcare, LLC

Circularity Healthcare, LLC, located in Los Angeles, CA is a private biotech and medtech products and services company that designs, makes, markets, sells, distributes and licenses its own patented and patent pending technologies, such as its flagship non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator product line, D’OXYVA®. One of the main mechanisms underlying D’OXYVA’s science received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2019. Circularity enters into exclusive agreements with manufacturers to launch products and with large and small clinics and hospitals in order to help them enhance their profits and credit profiles with a wide variety of advanced products and services. In addition, Circularity Healthcare assists in the financing of equipment, working capital and also patient financing at industry-leading terms and speed.

Posted on Leave a comment

Treating Microcirculation Defects in Cardiovascular Diseases

Defects in microcirculation have been documented as major factors in the development of cardiovascular diseases, especially type 1 diabetes.[1] By treating microcirculation defects, thus increasing blood and oxygen flow to the heart, the risk of recurrent significant cardiovascular events can be reduced significantly, and strength and endurance can improve. 

An example of microcirculation compromise in a patient with severe cardiovascular disease can be seen in the clinical case of Leo B.

Leo was a 64-year-old male with a medical history of diabetes mellitus for 15 years, cigarette smoking, elevated cholesterol, and high LDL (harmful blood fat) levels. 

Leo had a heart attack (myocardial infarction) several years ago.

He had suffered a myocardial infarction 6 weeks earlier and also suffered from exertional angina (chest pain with exertion).

He was taking lisinopril (20 mg per day) for high blood pressure, insulin for his diabetes, and one baby aspirin a day as a blood thinner to prevent another heart attack.

Leo was put on a cardiac rehabilitation regimen[2] consisting of a low-fat diet, moderate exercise, and stress control. 

He used D’OXYVA[3]as an adjunct application, which helped increase his strength and endurance while decreasing his episodes of exertional chest pain.

What is Microcirculation? 

In general, microcirculation[4] refers to the smallest blood vessels in the body, consisting of the arterioles, venules, and capillaries. 

These tiny blood vessels supply oxygen to the organs of the body and remove waste products produced by the body’s metabolism. 

Smooth muscle cells, which are the lining cells of the arterioles and of some venules, are under the control of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and other chemical factors. 

These influences help control the ability of the microcirculatory system to dilate and contract to increase or decrease circulation and oxygenation.

What is Coronary Microcirculation? 

Coronary microcirculation (microvascular network) refers to the smallest arterioles and venules that supply the heart. 

These tiny branching blood vessels play crucial roles in supplying oxygen and removing waste products from the heart muscle. 

When the heart requires more oxygen, the arterioles dilate, increasing blood flow to the heart. 

This is especially important if a patient suffers from cardiovascular conditions such as angina or heart failure. 

What Causes Cardiac Microcirculation Dysfunction? 

Dysfunction of cardiac microcirculation can be caused by many factors, including:

  • Dysfunction of the endothelial (lining) cells of the arterioles, which affects the ability of arterioles to dilate and allow for increased blood flow
  • Increased alpha 2 adrenergic activity, which leads to vasoconstriction and resultant decreased cardiac perfusion
  • Sclerosing of the arterioles, causing reduced blood flow and oxygenation 
Conclusion 

Microcirculation consists of the smallest blood vessels in the body and includes cardiac microcirculation, which plays a crucial role in supplying oxygen and removing waste products from the heart. The transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA plays an important role in increasing blood flow (perfusion) and resultant oxygenation to the cardiovascular system. This increase in oxygenation has been found to help increase endurance and strength and is an important adjunct solution to consider as part of cardiac rehabilitation.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

16 Signs You’re at Risk for Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious, chronic illness that can result in the loss of limbs or life if left untreated. There are many signs that you are at risk for developing the disease, and it’s important to know what they are. If you experience any or all of the following and can’t find a suitable explanation, make an appointment with your doctor.

If you get plenty of sleep every night but still go through bouts of fatigue throughout the day, it may be a sign you’re pre-diabetic.
Having to pee often or a lot (and even wetting the bed at night) is a classic sign you’re at risk for diabetes. If you begin to suspect you’re outside the norm, make a note every time you go to the bathroom and take the information to your doctor, who will let you know whether you need further testing.
Excessive thirst (when you’re not also doing a lot of sweating) is also somewhat suspicious. Track water intake for a few days while you wait to see your doctor. It could be an early symptom of type 2 diabetes, which has subtle signs, like thirst and frequent trips to the bathroom. Don’t ignore them.
It can be hard to separate “eating when you’re hungry” from “emotional eating.” But if you find yourself having actual hunger pangs often and beyond mealtimes, it may mean you’re at risk for diabetes.Bring it up with your doctor and track any other symptoms of risk, so she can determine whether more testing is advised.
A big risk for type 2 diabetes is if you have a terrible diet, one that is high in sugar, carbohydrates, and lots of processed foods. If you know you don’t eat well and especially if you show any other signs that you’re at risk for diabetes, talk to your doctor about it. Yes, you will be advised to make better choices. But you should know whether you’re headed to diabetes territory — or worse, that you’re already there.
Blurry vision is often one of the first signs of diabetes. If you can’t explain away fuzzy letters, or have the sudden inability to read texts and signs that had been readable before, flag this with your doctor.Interestingly, insulin treatments for diabetes also can blur vision. Know that your eyes are a window into your health. See the signs.
There can be several causes for a lack of saliva in your mouth (also known as “dry mouth”), and high levels of glucose is one of them. This puts you at risk for (or is a symptom of) diabetes.There are some pharmaceutical treatments for dry mouth. But before treating it, be sure to talk to your doctor about what you’re experiencing so that you can be tested for diabetes.In any case, dry mouth can lead to cavities and an increase in yeast infections in your mouth, so do not ignore it.
If you find that your clothes are getting tighter and tighter, particularly around the waist, you might be increasing your risk for developing diabetes. Talk to your doctor about it and take their advice, especially if changes in your eating and exercise routine are in order.
Headaches alone aren’t serious, but if you get them often enough it might be a sign that your blood sugar is out of whack — which may be a sign of diabetes. If you suspect this might be the case, or if you find the headaches are becoming regular and aren’t due to sleep issues or dehydration, bring it up with your doctor.
Mood swings have long been an early symptom of a hyperglycemia attack and type 2 diabetes. The mood swings might also be a consequence of suffering from other symptoms of the disease. Either way, don’t ignore them: Moodiness and depression might be your body telling you something really isn’t right.
People with diabetes often take much longer to heal from scrapes and cuts. They are also at risk for frequent infections.If you experience any of these symptoms, it could mean something else is going on. See your doctor to rule out or diagnose diabetes.
A sedentary lifestyle puts you at risk for lots of health ailments, including diabetes. Without regular exercise and movement, you’re at risk for a not well-regulated metabolic system, which, in turn, holds on to fatty deposits. That puts you in the higher risk category for developing type 2 diabetes.Do what you can to prevent it.
There are a number of specific skin problems related to diabetes. One particularly visible one is the darkening and thickening of skin, especially in the skin folds. Called acanthosis nigricans, it appears mostly in people who are very overweight.Sometimes, the skin becomes slightly raised and appears velvety. Other times, it looks like small warts on the side or back of the neck, armpits or in the breast and groin area.
If you’ve experienced sudden (and unintentional) weight loss, you might be at risk for diabetes. The lowered weight, in these cases, is due to high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and thyroid problems — all of which are serious and should be understood and treated by a doctor.So, while your jeans might start fitting better, this sudden and dramatic weight loss is nothing to get excited about.
High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerve pathways that send signals to the hands and feet. Hands and/or feet that feel tingly might be showing early signs of this damage and may certainly be a symptom of diabetes.Don’t ignore the discomfort or blame your shoes. Make an appointment with your doctor and get tested.
High blood sugar changes the balance in our bloodstreams and bodies, and makes us less effective in fighting off infections. Consequently, people with diabetes often experience urinary tract infections and yeast infections.If you haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes but you’re battling both often enough, let your doctor know. These conditions might be a sign that you’re at risk for developing full-blown type 2.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

Healthy Choices and Technology Equals Better Diabetes Management

By Justin Bennet

According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.5 million people are diagnosed with diabetes every year, 84.1 million Americans are considered prediabetic, and diabetes is in the top 10 causes of death in the US. These are alarming statistics, which can be unsettling if you have diabetes. However, living with a chronic condition in the 21st century means that you have access to technology and information that wasn’t available even as recently as the 1990s.

Smart Tech for Diabetics

Technology has done so much for medicine. There are now robots that can assist with surgery and devices you can wear to monitor everything from your heart rate to how much you sleep at night. Apple’s Series 4 smartwatch, for example, can output an ECG directly on the screen. It will also let you call for help via an emergency SOS function if you get into a bad situation.

Perhaps more importantly, this and other fitness trackers, such as the Fitbit, can help you keep tabs on your exercise routine by counting your steps and calculating your average active time each day. Knowing how much movement you get is paramount to keeping your body fit and healthy. Exercise, according to EndocrineNet, can help you manage your blood glucose levels.

Technology can go one step further by allowing you to take your exercise routines with you no matter where you are. Apps such as MyFitnessPal and 8Fit can encourage you to make healthy exercise choices, and they can also help you monitor what you eat, which is another crucial element related to diabetes management.

Your Actions Matter

While technology can give you the tools to take control of your health, ultimately, it is your actions that direct the path of your well-being.

A few things you can do to stay healthy are:

  • Maintain a relationship with your doctor. Your primary care provider will likely be the one to diagnose you with diabetes. Once the condition is established, they will refer you to an endocrinologist, who may work at an independent office, the hospital, or at a diabetes care center. Make sure to keep your appointments with both, and don’t be afraid to ask questions about caring for yourself. If you have yet to find an endocrinologist, sites like HealthGrades can help you make an informed decision.
  • Exercise and eat right. We’ve already mentioned how technology can help you exercise and eat right, but both of these deserve special emphasis. When you have diabetes, it is not enough to simply eat the right foods; you also have to avoid the wrong ones. Things like white bread, French fries, and sports drinks might seem innocent enough, but they can send your blood sugar skyrocketing while expanding your waistline. You’ll also want to enhance your diet with diabetes-safe supplements to help you manage your weight and keep it within an acceptable range. Nutrition is what gives your body the energy to function, and adding polyphenols and other lesser-known nutrients to your daily intake is an important step in managing your condition.
  • Take your medicine on time. If your doctor has put you on a prescription for your diabetes, it’s important to take it at the same time every day. This is another area where technology can enhance your self-care efforts via medication reminder apps. Pharmacist Christina Tarantola lists several of her favorites and also cautions that around half of all prescriptions are taken incorrectly.

When it comes to diabetes management, technology can get you halfway there. However, what you choose to do with it and the lifestyle decisions you make mean the difference between living with your condition and letting your condition rule your life.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Do you own a wearable fitness tracker? Is it really a fitness technology or just more of a fad? If your wearable records heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar, blood flow (perfusion index), blood oxygen (SpO2), blood pH, we challenge you to prove that you have the best wearable by testing its efficiency with D’OXYVA.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

Results of improved blood flow (perfusion index) is visible in just after 5 minutes of D’OXYVA therapy and on its highest just after 30 minutes!

Are you up for the challenge? Register below to get further details! Amazing prizes await!

Posted on Leave a comment

Prevention of Amputations in Diabetics

Prevention of Amputations in Diabetics

A major risk of having diabetes is the possibility of requiring an amputation. Most frequently, amputations due to diabetes first involve the great toe with worsening gangrene, which leads to amputation of the foot, amputation of the leg below the knee, and then amputation of the leg above the knee. The following is a case study of Douglas, who was a diabetic patient who required an amputation of his lower leg beneath the knee in order to survive.

Case of a Sixty-Three-Year-Old Man with an Amputation of the Left Lower Leg from Uncontrolled Diabetes

Douglas was a sixty-three-year-old patient with a past medical history that was significant for Type 2 diabetes mellitus and high blood pressure with an inability to walk more than two blocks without shortness of breath. Because his blood sugars were continually out of control even on insulin, Douglas developed damage to the nerves in his feet (peripheral neuropathy). This led to his inability to feel an ulcer forming on the tip of his left great toe. In addition, since his diabetes led to damage to the microcirculation (smallest blood vessels) in his feet, his ability to rapidly improve  from the ulcer was significantly delayed. Within forty-five days of the first occurrence of the blister, it became infected, which led to gangrene and sepsis and admission into the intensive care unit. The gangrene kept spreading, requiring first the amputation of his left great toe, then the amputation of his left foot, and finally the amputation of his entire left leg below the left knee. This case demonstrates how the extreme and potentially deadly risk of leg amputations in diabetics can be reduced through early diagnosis of the problem and aggressive preventative care, including the use of D’OXYVA[1].

D’OXYVA is a peripheral and noninvasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator that dilates the microcirculation (D’OXYVA delivers pharmaceutical grade CO2 and water vapor transdermally (through the skin), dilating the smallest veins, arteries, and capillaries while increasing peripheral blood flow to the lower extremities. D’OXYVA is a pain reliever that is given for fast pain relief treatments, which are known to reduce pain and chronic conditions.

Risk Factors for Amputations in Diabetics

In a study published in the Journal of Developing Countries in 2008, it was found that, of 146 diabetic patients studied who had amputations of the foot, 74% had had diabetes for two to forty years.

In addition, forty-seven percent of the patients who were studied had ischemia (reduced blood flow), and forty-four percent had neuropathy (reduced nerve function) of the foot involved.[2]

How to Decrease the Risk of an Amputation Due to Diabetes?

Steps you can take to decrease the risk of an amputation if you are diabetic [3] include:

  • Keep your blood sugars well under control to decrease the risk of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.
  • Check blood sugars as directed by your physician.
  • Check your feet and toes for changes in temperature or feeling every day.
  • Examine your feet daily for cracks, blisters, cuts, redness, white areas, thick calluses, and different changes in color.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Stay on a Diabetic diet.
  • Increase daily exercise levels.
  • Continue to take all prescribed medications.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound improve and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA eliminated pain and improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

Defects in Microcirculation and the Effect on Wound Healing: New Non-Invasive Treatments

The effects of defects in and poor functioning of the microcirculation on wound healing, especially in diabetic patients, can be devastating and life changing. As one particular example, Joseph L was a 63-year-old White male with a 24-year history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, elevated cholesterol and arthritis. Joseph had been taking insulin for the past 12 years but his blood sugar levels were still poorly controlled.

On physical exam, Joseph had several very large, oozing and foul smelling deep ulcers located on the dorsum (top) of the left foot. After 8 weeks of intensive therapy utilizing the non-invasive D’OXYVA transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator, Joseph’s ulcers healed entirely and he avoided amputation of his left foot. Read on to learn more about this new non-invasive wound treatment that helps in wound healing.

 

What is the microcirculation?

The microcirculation refers to the smallest blood vessels in the body that supply oxygen to the tissues and remove waste products. This includes the arterioles, the venules and the capillaries. When the vessels of the microcirculation become damaged, it leads to decreased blood flow with lower oxygen blood levels and resultant damage to the skin resulting in a wound or ulcer.

Risk Factors for the Creation of Chronic Wounds

Patients with the following risk factors are at greater risk for non-healing wounds or ulcers (ulcers are the most common type of chronic wounds):

  • A history of decreased blood flow to a specific area (ischemia)
  • A history of uncontrolled diabetes (which leads to poor circulation, nerve damage and breakage of the skin)
  • A history of uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • A history of high cholesterol and atherosclerosis (cholesterol plaques in the arteries)
  • A history of blood clots (thrombosis)

 

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers are a common complication of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.1 Chronically elevated blood sugar levels damage the microcirculation of the lower extremities, which leads to ischemia and neuropathy (damage to the nerves). Diabetic patients often lose feeling in the feet and so are not aware of friction and pressure, which leads to breaks in the skin. This subsequently leads to open wounds that often do not heal over a 30 day period. These wounds can then become infected, leading to gangrene and eventual amputation.

 

An Example of a New Non-Invasive Treatment to Enhance Wound Healing

D’OXYVA is a non-invasive transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator that delivers FDA-approved ultra-purified CO2 molecules which diffuse through the skin leading to increased skin perfusion. In studies of the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers with D’OXYVA, increased diabetic wound healing was observed with wound closure often observed within 5 weeks.

 

Conclusion

Chronic conditions like uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension can cause damage to the microcirculation, which leads to delayed wound healing. New treatment methods like D’OXYVA deliver transdermal CO2-enhanced oxygen and nutrients to wound areas through the microcirculation. This speeds up wound healing and wound closure and helps avoid devastating complications such as amputations.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound healing and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA eliminated pain and improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

How to Evaluate Microcirculation in Diabetics

Evaluating microcirculation in diabetics early on can help to develop a treatment plan that can help avoid complications like amputations. In the case of patient Rose D, early intervention helped save her great toe from amputation. Rose was a 63-year-old woman with a history of obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and severe diabetes with uncontrolled blood sugar levels. After suffering from an ingrown toenail, she later developed a large, deep, and bleeding ulcer on the tip of her left great toe. Analysis at a vascular surgery clinic clearly showed she was suffering from microcirculation malfunction due to her uncontrolled diabetes. Rose participated in a treatment regimen, consisting of strict blood sugar control and treatment with the transdermal vasodilator D’OXYVA, which effectively healed her ulcer and prevented amputation of her left great toe.

 

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is not able to produce the hormone insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, leading to abnormally high blood sugar levels. Elevated blood sugars can then cause damage to the large and small blood vessels supplying the eyes, feet, kidneys, heart, and nervous system, leading to end organ damage and organ failure.

Symptoms of Diabetic Complications in the Feet

Symptoms of diabetes mellitus-related foot complications include the following:

  • Changes in the skin color of the feet
  • Ankle or foot swelling
  • Numbness of the feet or toes
  • Leg pain
  • Open sore on the feet
  • Slow healing of wounds or ulcers
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Fungal infections of the toenails
  • Corns or calluses that bleed
  • Dryness and cracking of the heel


Avoiding Diabetic Foot Ulcers

The risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers can be reduced by

  • Wearing appropriate shoes
  • Checking feet for cracks, redness, or ulcers daily
  • Carefully controlling and checking blood sugars
  • Reducing risk factors like smoking and drinking alcohol
  • Monitoring cholesterol levels
  • Reducing friction and abnormal pressure on the feet
  • Taking all possible measures to increase blood flow D’OXYVA


How Does Diabetes Affect Microcirculation?

Microcirculation refers to the very small blood vessels that branch off from larger blood vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen and remove CO2 from the organs of the body. In diabetes, the chronically high blood sugar levels cause damage to the microcirculation1 through sclerosis (scarring) of the small blood vessel walls. This causes damage to both organs involved and the nerves supplying them. When the nerves are damaged in areas like the foot, there is a loss of what is known as protective sensation and a resultant failure to respond to normal pressures and irritations, thus leading to ulcers.


Risk of Amputations in Diabetes

Recent studies by the American Podiatric Medical Association2 indicate that approximately 15% of patients with diabetes will eventually develop ulcers of the feet, with 14% to 24% of those patients ending up with amputations. Each year, over 100,000 lower limbs are amputated, with most resulting from diabetic complications. After one amputation, the risk of needing another amputation in 3 to 5 years increases to about 50%.


Methods to Evaluate the Microcirculation in Diabetes

Method 1 – Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension

Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension (TOT)refers to a noninvasive method to assess blood flow in the microcirculation. TOT works by measuring the amount of oxygen molecules transferred to the microcirculation of the skin after heating it to 40 degrees Celsius.

Method 2  Skin Pulp Blood Flow

Skin pulp blood flow refers to the amount of blood flow in the pulp areas of the toes. This can be evaluated either by laser doppler fluxmetry, which measures the flow of red blood cells, or by comparing blood flows after administering a vasodilator (vasoreactivity).


Summary

Patients with severely reduced blood flow due to microcirculation damage from type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing complications such as painful foot ulcers. This is due to reduced blood flow and nerve damage, which prevent avoidance of undue friction and rubbing. Evaluating microcirculation dysfunction due to diabetes early in the course of the disease and treatment with modalities like D’OXYVA can help avoid complications like amputations.

          BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Clinical studies with D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) have shown* extraordinary results for the role of transdermal non-invasive wound care using ultra-purified, non-toxic FDA-cleared molecules, such as CO2, especially when all other approaches failed.

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound healing and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

Posted on Leave a comment

The Importance of Microcirculation in Wound Healing

The importance of microcirculation in wound healing cannot be overemphasized. Microcirculation enhances blood flow for better health benefits. D’OXYVA helps actualize the efficient flow of blood in the body. D’OXYVA utilizes carbon dioxide (CO2) and soft water vapor, popularly accepted as a natural vasodilator, to aid chronic wound healing processes. This enhances skin microcirculation and pressure, which bring about faster wound healing. Before we proceed to the core importance of microcirculation in wound healing, let’s look at the real meaning of microcirculation and how it relates to healing.

What Does Microcirculation Imply?

A healthy body is able to replace and renew injured tissues and heal wounds easily, and this can be achieved through effective and efficient blood flow. Microcirculation is the flow of blood through the tiniest blood vessels—the venules, capillaries, and arteriolesn the circulatory system.

In other words, microcirculation is the bridge between blood and single cells that supply oxygen and nutrients to the human body. Without proper blood flow, the body is prone to health dangers. Apart from the cornea, microcirculation exists in all tissues and organs. Microcirculation in wound healing can be made more effective if the enormous benefits of D’OXYVA are properly utilized.

What is the Function of Microcirculation in Wound Healing?

As mentioned, the role of microcirculation is enormously important for the speedy healing of chronic wounds. The primary function of microcirculation is the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, and it also enhances the removal of carbon dioxide. The core aim of microcirculation in wound healing is to regulate blood flow and tissue perfusion at all times. Now, let’s look at the importance of microcirculation in wound healing.

What is the Importance of Microcirculation in Wound Healing?

For the sake of this article, we shall review some core aspects of microcirculation related to wound healing, which include the following:

Microcirculation Enhances Fast Healing

As we know, effective blood flow results in healthy living. Microcirculation eases inflammation and calms all kinds of chronic wounds. This core objective can be effectively carried out with the help of D’OXYVA, which guarantees the highest concentration of carbon dioxide and increases consistent blood flow in the body’s microcirculatory system. It is safe, painless, and very simple to use.

Microcirculation Promotes Better Performance

Another salient aspect of microcirculation regarding wound healing is that it encourages healthy living by providing an easy flow of blood throughout the body. It enhances individual health at all ages and fosters general fitness. Microcirculation helps rebuild damaged tissues, thereby facilitating fast healing.

Enhances Renewal and Replacement of Damaged Tissues

The human body requires a recovery phase after a physical injury. The effectiveness of this recovery phase can be guaranteed by a constant flow of blood and a continuous supply of nutrients and oxygen. This is one of the reasons why microcirculation is vital to wound healing; it ensures that the necessary nutrients are readily available for cell renewal. Microcirculation facilitates the continuous flow of blood to the human body by supplying the cells with vital products and removing waste through the microvessels.

Treatment for Chronic Wounds and Other Respiratory diseases

The best way to achieve optimal microcirculation in wound healing is through D’OXYVA. D’OXYVA has become a household name in the health industry due to the health benefits it offers. It is a viable option to eliminate all kinds of chronic pain, wounds and forms of respiratory complications. This product is versatile in nature and guarantees the highest concentration of carbon dioxide, which fosters continuous blood flow. D’OXYVA is affordable, safe, painless, and easy to use. It does not cause any side effects.

Conclusion

Finally, the importance of D’OXYVA to microcirculation in wound healing cannot be underestimated; it is imperative to engage D’OXYVA for any kind of wound to promote fast and easy recovery.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

Clinical studies with D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) have shown* extraordinary results for the role of transdermal non-invasive wound care using ultra-purified, non-toxic FDA-cleared molecules, such as CO2, especially when all other approaches failed.

Posted on Leave a comment

Diabetes, cardiovascular disease and the microcirculation

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), yet a significant proportion of the disease burden cannot be accounted for by conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertension occurs in majority of people with T2DM, which is substantially more frequent than would be anticipated based on general population samples. The impact of hypertension is considerably higher in people with diabetes than it is in the general population, suggesting either an increased sensitivity to its effect or a confounding underlying aetiopathogenic mechanism of hypertension associated with CVD within diabetes. In this contribution, we aim to review the changes observed in the vascular tree in people with T2DM compared to the general population, the effects of established anti-diabetes drugs on microvascular outcomes, and explore the hypotheses to account for common causalities of the increased prevalence of CVD and hypertension in people with T2DM.

Background

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and people with T2DM and hypertension have an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality compared with those with either condition alone. This excess risk is suggested to be due to the synergistic effect on large and small blood vessels simultaneously, thereby reducing the potential for compensatory collateralization protecting organs from the adverse consequences of damage to either vascular bed. The principle role of the vasculature is to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the tissues—whether that is the heart, the brain, or the kidney. The functional changes occurring in T2DM and hypertensive conditions significantly alter the haemodynamic stress on the heart and other organs. However, the different physiology, mechanisms and changes at the microvascular level differ from those at the macrovascular level in T2DM and hypertension, which in turn have significant implications with respect to future CV risk.

Conclusions

Over the past few decades, epidemiological studies have elucidated the role of impaired microcirculation in people with diabetes and aetiopathogenesis of CVD. This has led to the recognition of the prevalence of microvascular disease. Furthermore, the prognostic value of incidence of microvascular disease in predicting CVD is now acknowledged. The focus of present-day epidemiological studies is to understand the association between pathological mechanisms and the risk factors to ascertain whether they are targets of therapeutic value or risk markers of CVD. These studies have contributed to the evidentiary framework in favour of clinical monitoring of microvascular function, and spurred the initiation of mechanistic studies by redefining our knowledge of vascular disease, particularly in people with diabetes.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Over the past few decades, epidemiological studies have elucidated the role of impaired microcirculation in people with diabetes and aetiopathogenesis of CVD. D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

My Neuropathy Story: This Is How My Diabetic Neuropathy Disappeared Forever

“I was first diagnosed with diabetes at a young age,” said Bryan, 50 years old. It was in his early 20s that he started to live with devastating pain in his legs from diabetic neuropathy and had deteriorating muscular degeneration. But today, Bryan can go jogging again, and even his vision is somewhat improving.

 

What happened?

“It’s simple, I started to look at my diet, did more research and found a new solution called D’OXYVA,” said Bryan.

 

Before D’OXYVA

Bryan was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes around 30 years ago. “I couldn’t believe when my doctor told me that my blood sugar levels are high,” he said, although he admitted that other risk factors were obvious, such as being overweight and the fact that diabetes runs in his family.

He ignored his diagnosis and paid little attention to diabetes. He was told to start eating healthy, yet he continued eating what he wanted and didn’t watch his weight.

“A few years ago, I started to feel tingling in my right foot, and it got worse day after day,” said Bryan. Soon, both feet felt numb and he began to feel the pain. It was so painful that he had a hard time taking a step.

At a routine checkup, his doctor wasn’t very happy with him ignoring his diabetes. His doctor told him that his blood glucose was dangerously erratic. From that time on, he became meticulous with managing his diabetes. He started using an insulin pump and other expensive technologies that he thought could help him. But despite all his efforts, Bryan’s health continued to decline, and the pain became more devastating. Despite his eye doctor’s best efforts, Bryan’s macular degeneration was not improving.

 

A solution called D’OXYVA

Bryan decided to do some research on his own. He remembered a patient he was sitting beside in the clinic talking about a product he had had success with. The product was called D’OXYVA.

From his research, he found out that microcirculatory dysfunction renders the diabetic foot unable to mount a vasodilatory response under conditions of stress, such as injury, and makes it functionally ischemic, even in the presence of satisfactory blood flow under normal conditions. Therefore, improving microcirculation to his feet would help with pain management and avoid further nerve damage.

 

D’OXYVA is noninvasive and uses an FDA-approved pharmaceutical-grade CO2. Additionally, it is a clinically validated blood flow and nerve stimulant for people suffering from neuropathy. In various clinical trials, D’OXYVA has been validated and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions at the same time.

 

It’s never too late to start a new journey

“I started off with their pro health set, and strictly followed twice a day D’OXYVA therapy as advised by their therapy expert after requesting for a customized treatment plan. They were very accommodating and professional. After 6 weeks, not only did the product help ease the pain, it got rid of the numbness. Plus, it didn’t cause side effects. My eye doctor also said he sees improvement in my vision,” said Bryan.

Now, Bryan and his wife are both in continuous D’OXYVA therapy as they found out that D’OXYVA, due to its microcirculatory enhancement capability, can help her with her varicose veins.

“I can’t wait to see how I will improve more after a few more months of using D’OXYVA,” Bryan said. He feels a new sense of vitality. He is now back on his feet, living free from the pain of diabetic neuropathy, and has better control of his blood sugar than he has ever had. He and his wife are looking forward to enjoying an active retirement full of exciting adventures and activities, including spending more time with their children and grandchildren.

“I see a new life and a new hope out there for you and for everyone who is experiencing the same,” said Bryan.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is a novel, clinically validated blood flow and nerve stimulant for people suffering from neuropathy. In various clinical trials, D’OXYVA has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions at the same time.

Subjects suffering from high blood sugar have reported neuropathy pain relief minutes after D’OXYVA was administered and long-term blood sugar level improvements in just a few weeks.