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Company shares shocking model of future remote worker as pandemic continues

Millions of American workers became remote employees overnight when the coronavirus pandemic hit earlier this year, and the future isn’t looking too bright for those who fail to maintain healthy habits while working from home in the long-term, new findings claim.

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Job discovery platform DirectlyApply recently unveiled a visual model for what future remote workers might look like in 25 years if they don’t reform bad habits now, in a figure they’ve named Susan.

Suffering from digital eye strain, poor posture, “tech neck,” obesity, increased stress due to lack of human contact and more, Susan dramatically exemplifies the physical repercussions remote workers may suffer if they fail to prioritize their physical and mental health beyond their 9 to 5.

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Suffering from digital eye strain, poor posture, tech neck, obesity, increased stress due to lack of human contact and more, Susan dramatically exemplifies the physical repercussions remote workers may suffer if they neglect to keep healthy habits.

Susan was created in partnership with a team of clinical psychologists and fitness experts to highlight the effects that isolated working can have on the body, according to DirectlyApply.

“With lockdown having forced people across the globe into what has been the world’s largest remote working experiment, our usual interpretation of the perk has been transformed forever,” a spokesperson for the job-searching site said in a statement shared with Fox News. “Whilst your bed-to-desk commute may allow for more free time and independence, will the physical repercussions to your mind and body be worth it in the future?”

With that being said, the London-based job searching site, which also operates in the U.S. and Canada, shared positive tips for improving physical and mental health while working remotely, amid an uncertain future.

To improve health and wellness during this time, remote workers are encouraged to stick to a routine to optimize productivity, nurture (virtual) social connections with colleagues, exercise outside, clearly delineate between working and living spaces to promote a healthy work-life balance and use free time wisely to support emotional health.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways, including but not limited to weight loss, recover from injury, improved performance, besides diabetes and heart health.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

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Non-Invasive Treatments: What No One Is Talking About

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Sometimes it seems like the best way to guess a person’s age is by how much medicine they take daily. This system is not perfect, as some people start medications early in life, but we all seem to accumulate pills and creams as we age. That is why it can be a relief to discover an application that can be used for multiple health disorders. 

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Alexa, a 58-year-old woman from Texas, United States, has suffered from type 2 diabetes for more than 6 years. She has been taking multiple medications and treatments such as inhibitors, metformin, pain relievers and antibiotics for her diabetic foot wound. After discovering D’OXYVA, a non-invasive application that significantly helped with her pain and wound management after 5 weeks of twice-daily application, she shared that she saved so much when she started decreasing the intake of other medications and avoided a possible amputation just by using this non-invasive application.

D’OXYVA, for example, can be applied for a variety of conditions related to poor circulation. This multi-application product helps consumers save money, space, and time while simplifying everyday life.

Here are a few things about non-invasive treatments that people seem unwilling to discuss.

In layman’s terms, non-invasive treatments do not break the skin or enter beyond the surface of body openings. Invasive treatments include surgery and injections. Because the needles actually penetrate the skin, acupuncture is also considered an invasive procedure. Certain procedures may be considered minimally invasive if they do not penetrate deeply into the body or only require a small incision.

Non-invasive procedures include massage and gas delivery systems such as D’OXYVA.

By nature, an invasive procedure can be hazardous. Even under a doctor’s care, for example, minimally invasive surgical procedures carry risks (Mayo Clinic). Patients can experience unforeseen complications related to anesthesia, infections, or bleeding. While these risks are mitigated with less serious regular treatments, any invasive procedure carries the potential for infections or bleeding complications.

While you should always trust your medical professional’s advice, many non-invasive treatments can be safer. Most doctors will attempt to find the least invasive, most effective treatment.

Although the human body contains many different cells and functional systems, most of them share the same basic processes. For example, every cell in the body depends on a healthy circulation system to receive nutrients and oxygen. Therefore, when a person has circulation problems, it can manifest as a number of issues. Your doctor may be able to recommend one product like D’OXYVA for multiple circulation-related issues.

Examples of Circulation Related Issues

  • Slow-healing wounds, especially those related to diabetes or other cardiovascular issues
  • Septic shock related to a severe infection or a compromised immune system
  • Many forms of chronic pain
  • Varicose veins and other blemishes

 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

If you suffer from symptoms related to poor circulation, you may not need to suffer in silence.

        BUY D’OXYVA

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Improving Microcirculation for Weight Reduction in Obesity

weight loss obesity

Obesity, by definition, is a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 kg per square meter or greater. The prevalence of obesity has increased and is now thought to affect more than one third of the adult population.[1] Recent studies have shown that obesity has an adverse effect on microcirculation and is an important risk factor for the development of many health problems, such as metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, elevated lipid levels, high blood pressure and increased abdominal girth), ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and other cardiovascular diseases.[2] The following case demonstrates how improving microcirculation can help with weight reduction in obese patients.

Brenda V was a 39-year-old white female patient with severe obesity and a BMI of 52.4 kilograms per square meter.

Brenda’s past medical history was significant because it included a history of morbid obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, gout, and depression.

She revealed that she could only walk for one block without severe shortness of breath and had to sleep on 2 pillows at night.

On physical examination, her weight was 340 pounds, and her height was 5 feet, 1 inch.

Her blood pressure was 180/105, and her cardiovascular exam revealed severe pitting edema of both legs.

Brenda’s abdomen was distended and morbidly obese with decreased bowel sounds.

Her laboratory exam showed a hemoglobin A1C level of 12.5% (normal is less than 5.7%) and a triglyceride level of 600 mg/dl (normal is less than 150 mg/dl).

Brenda was put on a regimen of diet, increased exercise, and the use of the peripheral deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA[3] for 5 minutes per day, 5 times a week, for a 3 month period.

After this treatment she had the following improvements:

  • Increased physical activity
  • Decreased blood sugar levels
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Decreased triglyceride levels
  • Decreased HgbA1C levels
  • Increased cardiac function
  • Increased endurance
  • Increased physical fitness
  • Decreased depression
  • Massively decreased weight
  • Increased mobility

      BUY D’OXYVA

How Does Obesity Affect Microcirculation?

Microcirculation[4] refers to the body’s smallest branching blood vessels (arterioles, venules, and capillaries with internal diameters less than 100 microns) that supply oxygen to and remove wastes products from the body’s tissues.

Microcirculation responds to changes in metabolic demands or sympathetic nervous system activation by either expanding or contracting to increase or decrease perfusion levels.

Early in the course of obesity, dysfunctional changes begin to appear in microcirculatory endothelial lining cells”.

These changes are caused by oxidative stress and inflammation of the microcirculation[5] and are now thought to lead to both insulin resistance and hypertension.

Conclusion

Obesity has been found to lead to microcirculatory dysfunction, which causes severe health problems, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and various cardiovascular diseases. Reducing obesity through a program of strict dietary control, increased exercise and the use of D’OXYVA to enhance microcirculation can significantly improve general health and reduce the risk of potentially lethal health complications.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Healthy Choices and Technology Equals Better Diabetes Management

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

By Justin Bennet

According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.5 million people are diagnosed with diabetes every year, 84.1 million Americans are considered prediabetic, and diabetes is in the top 10 causes of death in the US. These are alarming statistics, which can be unsettling if you have diabetes. However, living with a chronic condition in the 21st century means that you have access to technology and information that wasn’t available even as recently as the 1990s.

Smart Tech for Diabetics

Technology has done so much for medicine. There are now robots that can assist with surgery and devices you can wear to monitor everything from your heart rate to how much you sleep at night. Apple’s Series 4 smartwatch, for example, can output an ECG directly on the screen. It will also let you call for help via an emergency SOS function if you get into a bad situation.

Perhaps more importantly, this and other fitness trackers, such as the Fitbit, can help you keep tabs on your exercise routine by counting your steps and calculating your average active time each day. Knowing how much movement you get is paramount to keeping your body fit and healthy. Exercise, according to EndocrineNet, can help you manage your blood glucose levels.

Technology can go one step further by allowing you to take your exercise routines with you no matter where you are. Apps such as MyFitnessPal and 8Fit can encourage you to make healthy exercise choices, and they can also help you monitor what you eat, which is another crucial element related to diabetes management.

Your Actions Matter

While technology can give you the tools to take control of your health, ultimately, it is your actions that direct the path of your well-being.

A few things you can do to stay healthy are:

  • Maintain a relationship with your doctor. Your primary care provider will likely be the one to diagnose you with diabetes. Once the condition is established, they will refer you to an endocrinologist, who may work at an independent office, the hospital, or at a diabetes care center. Make sure to keep your appointments with both, and don’t be afraid to ask questions about caring for yourself. If you have yet to find an endocrinologist, sites like HealthGrades can help you make an informed decision.
  • Exercise and eat right. We’ve already mentioned how technology can help you exercise and eat right, but both of these deserve special emphasis. When you have diabetes, it is not enough to simply eat the right foods; you also have to avoid the wrong ones. Things like white bread, French fries, and sports drinks might seem innocent enough, but they can send your blood sugar skyrocketing while expanding your waistline. You’ll also want to enhance your diet with diabetes-safe supplements to help you manage your weight and keep it within an acceptable range. Nutrition is what gives your body the energy to function, and adding polyphenols and other lesser-known nutrients to your daily intake is an important step in managing your condition.
  • Take your medicine on time. If your doctor has put you on a prescription for your diabetes, it’s important to take it at the same time every day. This is another area where technology can enhance your self-care efforts via medication reminder apps. Pharmacist Christina Tarantola lists several of her favorites and also cautions that around half of all prescriptions are taken incorrectly.

When it comes to diabetes management, technology can get you halfway there. However, what you choose to do with it and the lifestyle decisions you make mean the difference between living with your condition and letting your condition rule your life.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Do you own a wearable fitness tracker? Is it really a fitness technology or just more of a fad? If your wearable records heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar, blood flow (perfusion index), blood oxygen (SpO2), blood pH, we challenge you to prove that you have the best wearable by testing its efficiency with D’OXYVA.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

Results of improved blood flow (perfusion index) is visible in just after 5 minutes of D’OXYVA therapy and on its highest just after 30 minutes!

Are you up for the challenge? Register below to get further details! Amazing prizes await!

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A Success Story: Enjoying the stage again after years of chronic pain

chronic pain success story

Rachel shares how her healthcare professionals, along with the use of D’OXYVA, have helped her every step of the way.

My story started 2 years ago when I severely injured my ankle. At that time, I was working hard preparing for a dance presentation. I am a professional ballet dancer; my injury happened after a grand jeté, when I landed badly on my right foot. I needed to undergo surgery and rehab.

It was so painful that I had a hard time sleeping. Luckily, I got some pain meds so I could fall asleep. The nights were rough. I would wake up every two hours to call the nurses and ask for more medicine.

According to the doctors, this fracture could leave me limping for life. When I heard those words, my world just fell apart. I didn’t know how to accept my situation. I wouldn’t be able to dance again? I wouldn’t be able to walk again? I started to view life differently; I was hopeless.

I had to undergo months of rehab and physical therapy. Luckily, I had my friends and family to support me all the way. I slowly noticed I was feeling better; I could slowly stand up and take a few steps.

A few weeks before Christmas, due to my eagerness to recover so I could dance again, I once again aggravated my ankle after forcing it. The pain was excruciating; it felt like the first time I fractured it. That time I thought, “I’m done. I’m giving up; I will never really be able to dance again.” I had to undergo surgery and rehab for the second time, but this time, I didn’t feel like doing it; I thought it was useless, much more so after the doctor told me that the chances I could dance again were small.

One month later, I met Janina, my co-ballet dancer, at the rehab center undergoing the same physical therapy as I was. She told me she had just fractured her ankle about 4 weeks earlier; I was amazed at how fast she seemed to be recovering. I couldn’t help but ask what she had been doing or what medications she had been taking.

She then pulled a device from her bag and said, “This is D’OXYVA. This helped me with my recovery really well.” I was intrigued. Janina told me that her mother, who is diabetic, had been using D’OXYVA to manage her neuropathy and her diabetic wound, so she thought it might help her, too. Indeed, it helped her recover quickly, and she barely felt any pain from her injured ankle.

When I arrived home, I turned on my computer and did my research on D’OXYVA. Their customer support was very helpful with all the questions I had.

After almost 4 weeks of twice daily D’OXYVA therapy with the help of my orthopedic doctor and therapist, I was walking; after 5 weeks, the pain was almost gone. Now, it’s been almost 8 weeks, my D’OXYVA therapy has been reduced to 4 times a week, and I’m back at the rehearsal studio. It was an unexpected turn of events. I went from hopeless to hopeful!

I am still continuing my D’OXYVA therapy at least 3 times a week and working my way to becoming fully recovered. I’d like to thank Janina for introducing me to D’OXYVA. It gave me hope and positive vibes during my recovery stage. As for the D’OXYVA support staff, my orthopedic doctor, and my physical therapist, I couldn’t ask for a more professional, caring, and extremely helpful group. They are just plain AMAZING, all of them!

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA improves blood oxygenation. Oxygen is one of the body’s natural healers. If you have ever taken deep breaths to help reduce your stress or pain, you know that increasing oxygen flow throughout your body can help with healing and minimizing pain.

In various clinical studies, D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) has achieved over 90%* elimination of all sorts of chronic pain in 100% of subjects either the same day or in a few days, such as from a very high 8 to a very low 1 on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS).

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Under Armour developing ‘smart’ sneaker that reads blood pressure

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Under ArmourOpens a New Window. is developing a “smart” sneaker that would track the blood pressure of its wearer, according to a patent filing this week.

The sports apparel brand’s filing with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office details two versions of a sneaker currently in development. The first version of the sneaker would link to a wearable device and transmit blood pressure that would then be used to adjust the sneaker’s fit for optimal blood flow. The second version of the sneaker contains a “blood pressure detector.”

In the patent filing, Under Armour said the sneaker is meant to help its wearer recover after a “strenuous workout.”

“There exists a need for a device and method to effectively pump blood through the plantar venous plexus and support recovery after engaging in athletic activity,” the company wrote in its filing, dated June 25.

Under Armour representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Baltimore Business Journal was first to report on the filing.

The filing comes as Under Armour and other sports apparel companies seek to integrate technology into their products.

The Baltimore-based company unveiled its first smart shoe, the “HOVR Connected Series,” in 2018. The footwear line measures a runner’s gait and other workout data.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation. 

D’OXYVA promotes benefits related to significantly improved blood circulation, including significantly increased cardiac activity, physical fitness, metabolism, endurance, energy balance and a healthy weight by significantly improving Microcirculation that is detectable real-time with high quality diagnostics.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Microcirculation in Hypertension, A New Target for Treatment?

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

The number of effective agents available for the treatment of hypertension is now substantial. However, in spite of this, most would agree that there is still considerable scope for improvement in the way hypertension is managed. In many countries, the great majority of hypertensive subjects still show imperfect blood pressure control.1 Furthermore, the reductions or improvements in end-organ damage seen during antihypertensive therapy do not always correlate well with the reduction in arterial blood pressure achieved. Thus, there seems to be a need for new therapeutic perspectives in the treatment of hypertension. One important new perspective might be provided by an enhanced appreciation of the importance of the microcirculation in the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertension.

 

The Microcirculation in Hypertension

In hypertension, the structure and function of the microcirculation may be altered in at least 3 ways. First, the mechanisms regulating vasomotor tone may be abnormal, leading to enhanced vasoconstriction or reduced vasodilator responses. Second, there may be anatomic alterations to the structure of individual precapillary resistance vessels, such as an increase in their wall-to-lumen ratio. Finally, there may be changes at the level of the microvascular network, perhaps involving a reduction in the density (rarefaction) of arterioles or capillaries within a given vascular bed. It is likely that the relative contributions of these factors will be different in different vascular beds and may vary between different forms and models of hypertension. Nevertheless, it is possible to discern a historical shift in the focus of antihypertensive therapy between these different mechanisms. Initially, antihypertensive therapy was directed mainly toward altering vasomotor tone and promoting vasodilation. More recently, attention was directed toward reducing or reversing changes in resistance vessel structure, and in the last few years, there has been a further evolution toward reducing or reversing microvascular network rarefaction. Interestingly, several antihypertensive agents that act acutely to reduce vasomotor tone are now known to have additional chronic actions on vessel and network structure, which may be more important in the long-term treatment of hypertension.

In this article, we review the animal and human evidence available for the role of the microcirculation during hypertension and the effects of therapy, focusing on those aspects that are likely to be common to most forms of hypertension and most organ systems.

Microcirculatory Abnormalities in Hypertension: Both Cause and Effect?

It has been known for many years that the diameter and structure of small resistance arteries can alter in response to changes in blood pressure and flow. There have been numerous reports of decreases in arteriolar diameters in experimental secondary hypertension.4 Increases in the media-to-lumen ratio of small arteries have also been widely documented in several forms of hypertension,4 consistent with the classic view that vessels maintain constant wall stress in the face of changing pressure. However, it is not clear whether similar changes occur in arterioles in primary hypertension. In SHR, arterioles have not been reported to show consistently reduced luminal diameter or wall thickening (reviewed by Struijker Boudier et al).4

A more consistent observation has been microvessel rarefaction. A reduction in the number or density of microvessels has been reported for many years in most forms of clinical and experimental hypertension. Several studies have documented microvessel rarefaction in SHR and after the experimental induction of secondary hypertension.4

It has been suggested that rarefaction may occur in 2 phases.9 The first phase of functional rarefaction involves microvessel constriction to the point of nonperfusion, possibly as a result of increased sensitivity to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The nonperfused vessels may then disappear, leading to the second phase of structural or anatomic rarefaction, which cannot be reversed by maximal vasodilation. In patients with primary hypertension, the reduction in density of capillaries in the skin of the dorsum of the fingers has recently been shown to be mainly a result of anatomic rather than functional rarefaction.10

It is therefore possible to view microvessel abnormality and rarefaction as responses to increased vascular pressure. However, this is clearly not always the case, because microvascular changes similar to those observed in hypertension can be found in conditions such as scleroderma, syndrome X, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the absence of any elevation in arterial blood pressure. Furthermore, there is evidence that abnormalities in the microcirculation may cause or contribute to the elevation of blood pressure.

Targeting the Microcirculation to Prevent End-Organ Damage: Beyond Blood Pressure Reduction?

Numerous trials have demonstrated that antihypertensive therapy is effective in reducing major vascular events, including stroke and coronary heart disease. However, several forms of specific end-organ damage that primarily involve the microcirculation are thought to be secondary to hypertension, including nephropathy, retinopathy, lacunar infarction, and microvascular angina. Thus, it is to be expected that there will be additional benefits from targeting the microcirculation during antihypertensive therapy in terms of the prevention of or reduction in end-organ damage.

One of the most intensively studied forms of end-organ damage with microvascular involvement is microalbuminuria or increased urinary albumin excretion. Microalbuminuria is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in nondiabetic and diabetic individuals. In the Framingham study, proteinuria was 3 times more common in hypertensive than in normotensive individuals and was associated with a 3-fold increase in mortality.18 Importantly, hypertensive patients with microalbuminuria have an increased cardiovascular risk compared with normoalbuminuric patients with similar blood pressure.19

Although microalbuminuria may be an early marker of renal dysfunction, it is now clear that it can be reversible. A recent large-scale study of 6000 nondiabetic hypertensive patients showed that microalbuminuria can be reversed in many cases by antihypertensive therapy.20 In SHR, different antihypertensive agents have different effects on renal afferent arteriolar structure. ACE inhibition produced a greater increase in the diameters of distal afferent arterioles than a calcium antagonist of equivalent hypotensive effect.21

The heart is another organ that may suffer end-organ damage, and numerous studies have reported changes in myocardial microvessel structure and density in hypertension. During normal development, myocardial microvascular density increases during the first few postnatal weeks but then decreases, probably because angiogenesis fails to match the growth in myocyte volume.22 During the pressure-overload hypertrophy that often accompanies hypertension, the picture that emerges from studies in both animals and human patients is that microvessel growth is insufficient to prevent dilution because of the greater increase in other myocardial components; hence, microvascular density decreases.22 It has been argued that microvascular changes may make a substantial contribution to the development of cardiac failure in hypertensive patients.23

The risk of stroke is greatly increased by hypertension. Although there are multiple causes of stroke, the form that is perhaps most closely associated with small-vessel abnormality is lacunar infarction, the occurrence of small, deep infarcts thought to be caused by the occlusion or rupture of small vessels, largely as a result of hypertensive changes.

Hypertensive changes in cerebral arteriolar structure have been documented in animal models. In SHR, reductions in the external diameter and increases in the media-to-lumen ratio of cerebral arterioles have been reported.24 However, most reports conclude that neither cerebral arterioles nor capillaries undergo rarefaction in SHR or in other experimental models of hypertension. At least some forms of antihypertensive therapy can reverse structural changes in cerebral microvessels25 and can dramatically increase the lifespan of stroke-prone SHR.26,27

Conclusions

Abnormalities of microvessel structure and microvascular network density often accompany, and may be an important cause of, primary hypertension. Microcirculatory abnormalities are also likely to be central to many forms of hypertensive end-organ damage, including those involving the kidneys, heart, and brain. Optimal antihypertensive therapy should therefore be targeted at both large and small vessels. Available evidence suggests that the 2 longest-established classes of antihypertensive agents, diuretics and β-blockers, have no specific beneficial actions on the microcirculation. However, the results of numerous animal studies and a much smaller number of clinical studies indicate that the newer classes of antihypertensive agents and some combinations of agents offer considerable potential for improving microvessel structure and network density. It would therefore be predicted that more widespread use of these agents and combinations would enable substantial reductions in end-organ damage to be achieved, with consequent reductions in morbidity and mortality. Much further clinical research is needed to assess the extent to which this potential can be realized in clinical practice.

This article was written on behalf of the European Working Group for Microcirculation and Cardiovascular Disease. Other members are E. Agabiti-Rosei, University of Brescia, Italy; T.F. Lüscher, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; G.A. MacGregor, St George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK; and E. Vicaut, Hôpital Fernand Widal, Paris, France.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Did you know when used in a regimen, D`OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits?

doxyva benefits

OPTIMIZE BLOOD CIRCULATION FOR A WIDE VARIETY OF SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) in various clinical trials has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions at the same time.

People using D’OXYVA® have recorded significant improvements in cardiovascular activity leading to much improved physical activity. As part of a healthy lifestyle, D’OXYVA may help significantly reduce the risk of high blood pressure, hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes in just two or three months, with an average use of 5 minutes a day and 5 times a week.

Poor circulation is a gateway for a litany of ailments: slow healing, depression, poor complexion, sores, slow metabolism, and more.

D’OXYVA significantly improves sustained oxygen-rich microcirculatory blood flow locally and throughout the body. Its patented method of fully non-invasive, painless, and harmless transdermal delivery is unique only to D’OXYVA.

When used daily, D’OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits, including but not limited to:

  • Relief from symptoms of microvascular complications
  • Significantly increased cardiac function, physical fitness, endurance and strength, muscle size, body tone, faster recovery from sports injuries and surgical trauma
  • Improved self-esteem via promoting healthy and radiant skin, complexion, dry skin relief, and acne reduction
  • Significant reduction in downtime from other skin treatments and cosmetic procedures when used in combination, reduction in the appearance of scars, cellulite, fat, spider veins and stretch marks
  • Promoting and maintaining a healthy weight, improving general mobility, deeper, more restful sleep
  • Significant improvement of mental acuity; concentration, problem solving, multitasking, eye-hand coordination, heightened stamina, energy, and focus while managing stress
  • Improved vitals across the board during checkups with zero adverse event reports after years of regular use by people with various health, demographic, and ethnic backgrounds

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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4 things you should know about erectile dysfunction

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Erectile dysfunction (ED), once shrouded in secrecy, is now in the spotlight, thanks to high-profile advertisements for drugs like Cialis, Viagra, Levitra, and Stendra. But despite this greater awareness of ED, many men — and women — don’t really know much about this condition. Here are four things to know about ED.

ED is often the result of diseases or conditions that become more common with age. It can also be a side effect of the medications used to treat them. Other possible causes of ED include prostate surgery, stress, relationship problems, and depression.
Other age-related factors besides disease can also affect a man’s ability to have an erection — for example, with age, tissues become less elastic and nerve communication slows. But even these factors don’t explain many cases of ED.

Cardiovascular disease is a common cause of ED. Clogged arteries (atherosclerosis) affect not only the blood vessels of the heart, but those throughout the body as well. In fact, in up to 30% of men who see their doctors about ED, the condition is the first hint that they have cardiovascular disease.

Intriguing findings from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study suggest there may be a natural ebb and flow to ED — that is, for some men, trouble with erections may occur, last for a significant amount of time, and then partly or fully disappear without treatment.
Regardless of the cause, ED often can be effectively addressed. For some men, simply losing weight and exercising more may help.

Others may need medications, and there are other options available as well. Given the variety of therapies available, the possibility of finding the right solution is greater than ever.

 

Reference: https://www.health.harvard.edu/mens-health/4-things-you-should-know-about-erectile-dysfunction

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Are Veiny Arms Really a Sign You’re Super Fit?

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

You’ve seen the crazy photo of cyclist Pawel Poljanski’s insane leg veins after his 70-hour Tour de France pump. And the Rock boasts a pretty impressive bicep vein, too. Plus, go to any bodybuilding competition, and you’ll see a whole slew of guys with impressive vascularity as well.

What all these veiny guys have in common is that they are in tremendous shape. But is vascularity really a sign of superb fitness?First, let’s take a look at the reason your veins pop in the first place.

Your arteries carry blood away from your heart to the tissues throughout your body, like your muscles. Your veins—which have thin walls and dilate easily—pump the blood back toward your heart.

“The venous outflow is slower than arterial inflow, causing a back-up of venous blood causing higher pressure in the veins,” says Doug McGuff, M.D., author of Body By Science. That increases pressure causes the veins to “pop” out. That’s the pump you get.

But what you’re doing also plays a role in the pop, too.

“Swelling in the muscles pushes the veins out to the surface,” says Spencer Nadolsky, D.O., author of The Fat Loss Prescription. “Your muscles swell when working out and push the veins closer to the surface of your skin, which makes them more pronounced.”

You probably notice your veins popping more during weight lifting than when you’re simply taking a walk or doing other kinds of light cardio.

In general, higher-rep weight lifting with fast concentric movements—say, the part of a biceps curl when you bring the weight up toward your arm—would trigger the biggest pump, says Dr. Nadolsky.

“High intensity interval work can produce this effect as well,” says Dr. McGuff. “Muscular loading and fatigue drive arterial inflow into the muscle, so exercise that triggers this will produce venous engorgement.”

Okay, so your veins tend to pop when you’re working out, but does how veiny you get actually depend on how fit you are? Well, sort of.

The leaner you are—meaning, the less subcutaneous fat you have covering your muscles—the more pronounced your veins will look, says Dr. Nadolsy.

But it’s not just about being lean: Having low body fat along with upped muscle mass is the magic combination for veins that pop, even when you’re at rest. So in some ways, pronounced veins are an indirect sign of fitness.

 

 

Reference: https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/vascularity-and-fitness-level