Posted on Leave a comment

Why the World’s Highest Virus Death Rate Is in Europe’s Capital

In an art-deco building in the heart of Brussels, Belgium’s leading scientists gather daily to announce the country’s coronavirus toll. It’s been grim reading.

Despite having only 11 million people, the country has reported more deaths from the disease than China. With some 57 fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants, it has the highest per-capita death rate in the world — almost four times that of the U.S.

Share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

Belgian Toll

Europe’s highest coronavirus death rates are in tiny Belgium

Source: ECDC, data as of April 24

According to Belgian officials, the reason for the grisly figures isn’t overwhelmed hospitals — 43% of intensive-care beds were vacant even at the peak of the crisis — but the country’s bureaucratic rigor.

Unlike many other countries, the home of the European Union’s top institutions counts deaths at nursing homes even if there wasn’t a confirmed infection.

“We often get criticism — oh, you’re making Belgium look bad — we think it’s the opposite,” Steven Van Gucht, head of the viral disease division at the Sciensano public-health institute, said while maintaining the requisite distance of 1.5 meters (5 feet). “If you want to compare our numbers with a lot of other countries, you basically have to cut them in half.”

Clearer Picture

About 95% of COVID-19 deaths in elderly care homes haven’t been diagnosed, yet Belgium makes the decision to register them based on the symptoms shown and who the people have been in contact with. The goal is to get a clearer picture of the outbreak and better target hot spots.

At the start of each briefing at the Residence Palais, a stone’s throw from the European Commission, Belgian officials detail the day’s statistics in French and Dutch. They draw particular attention to those who die outside of hospitals — typically around half the total.

The impact of the disease on vulnerable care-home residents is a growing issue. While Europe knew it would need more ventilators and intensive-care capacity once the virus spread beyond China, the impact on nursing homes was unexpected, according to Agoritsa Baka, a senior expert at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

“It’s a disaster,” she said. “We did not realize how devastating COVID-19 would be if it entered these populations.”

Excess Mortality

Yet not all European countries are measuring the impact in the same way, meaning that the numbers of coronavirus deaths are likely thousands higher than the official count of more than 110,000.

The consequence of uneven practices was evident in France. When the country reported data from some nursing homes for the first time in early April, those fatalities were almost double the number of people that died in hospitals.

Last week, Spain had to adjust its historical data after Catalonia started including people who had symptoms but didn’t test positive. This week a local radio broadcaster reported that more than 6,800 elderly died in Spanish nursing homes with symptoms but weren’t recorded in official data.

Germany’s unusually low mortality rate may be helped by the fact that the country only counts deaths that have a positive virus test.

Such discrepancies show up in a concept called “excess mortality,” the number of extra fatalities above typical trends. In Belgium, just over 300 people normally die every day, but this year, it’s jumped to nearly 600.

A project called euroMOMO, originally developed for gauging the scale of flu epidemics, is now being used to track the impact of the coronavirus in Europe.

Good Surveillance

Belgium’s practice means that nearly all deaths are accounted for in a given week, while neighboring Netherlands has around 1,000 undefined fatalities. Some countries’ virus deaths are around a sixth of their excess mortality rates.

Better tracking could help improve Europe’s response to outbreaks, especially as the region gradually eases lockdown restrictions, raising the prospect of second-wave outbreaks. Coordinated procedures could also defuse tensions as Europe grapples with recovery efforts.

“We are still in a situation where within the EU we do not count the same way, which could lead to political misunderstandings,” said Pascal Canfin, chair of EU Parliament’s environment and health committee. “It leads to different perception awareness of the crisis.”

In the meantime, the world’s eyes shouldn’t be focused on Belgium because at least the extent of the problem is known, according to Van Gucht.

“When you have a good surveillance system, you report a lot of cases,” he said. “It’s the countries that are not reporting or that are reporting very low numbers, you should be more worried about.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Our organization has been on the forefront in the fight against the novel coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China (COVID-19) since January of this year due to our organization’s operations in major countries across Asia. We all should understand the need to act now and arrest this crisis head on by spurring economic activity wherever we can and providing effective, affordable and rapid testing and treatments for the masses.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

Posted on Leave a comment

New CDC data shows danger of coronavirus for those with diabetes, heart or lung disease, other chronic conditions

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

People who have chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, lung disease and heart disease, face an increased chance of being hospitalized with covid-19 and put into intensive care, according to data released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that is consistent with reports from China and Italy.

Share this:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on whatsapp

The new data gives the most sweeping look at the way covid-19 is causing serious illnesses among people in the United States who already face medical challenges.

The report reinforces a critically important lesson: Although the disease is typically more severe among older people, people of any age with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk if they contract the virus, for which there is no vaccine or approved drug treatment. 

The CDC data is an initial description of how the disease appears to be affecting people who are already dealing with health challenges. The study did not break down the disease demographically, for example by age, sex, race or income. The agency also notes that this is essentially a snapshot and can’t capture the ultimate outcome for people who have been infected with the virus and haven’t yet recovered.

The report shows covid-19 is thrusting vulnerable people in the United States into intensive care units and disproportionately taking the lives of people who already face medical challenges.

The CDC analyzed more than 7,000 confirmed covid-19 cases across the country in which health officials had a written record about the presence or absence of any underlying medical condition. The preexisting conditions covered in the records include heart and lung diseases, diabetes, chronic renal disease, chronic liver disease, immunocompromised conditions, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental or intellectual disability, pregnancy, current or former smoker status, and “other chronic disease.”

The CDC found that, of people requiring admission to an intensive care unit, 78 percent had at least one underlying health condition. Of people hospitalized but not requiring ICU admission, 71 percent had at least one such condition, compared with just 27 percent of people who didn’t need to be hospitalized.

Among all the cases analyzed, 10.9 percent of patients had diabetes mellitus, 9.2 had chronic lung disease and 9 percent had cardiovascular disease.

The report did not reach any conclusion about whether the severity of an underlying condition correlated to a more severe covid-19 illness.

Of the 7,160 patients whose chronic illness status was known through health records, 184 died, and 173 of them had an underlying condition, the CDC said. None of the deaths were among people under age 19.

Covid-19 is a respiratory disease. The virus typically infects the upper respiratory tract, but it can also venture deeper into the lungs and in some patients results in pneumonia-like symptoms, requiring hospitalization and sometimes intubation on a ventilator. People who smoke or have chronic lung conditions are especially vulnerable.

Diabetes and heart disease are similarly worrisome. Someone already suffering from heart problems — whether they had previous heart attack or required a stent installed because of plaque buildup in their vascular system — may have a heart that cannot take as much strain as the average person, said Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease physician at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

When a patient gets infected with something like this coronavirus, the fever causes a spike in the heart rate. Shortness of breath means the patient gets less oxygen. People with limited cardiac capacity can go into arrest.

Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome that involves blood glucose levels and affects how the immune system works, and makes it less effective, Adalja said.

“This is why patients with diabetes are at risk for many infections not just coronavirus,” Adalja said. “They often struggle with infections on their skin and soft tissues, with pneumonia and even more serious conditions.”

Those in the high risk group need to be extremely careful.

“If they do become infected, the threshold for them seeking medical attention needs to be much lower. They and their clinicians have to keep this in mind,” Adalja said. “These numbers show us just how crucial that is.”

Wilbur Chen, an infectious-disease physician at the University of Maryland, added that while the virus seems to prey on the elderly and sick, “it does not mean it does not cause severe illness in younger adults or in children — in other words, the risk is not zero among the young.”

He said, “We are now documenting a large number of covid-19 infections across the U.S. and we are now observing more and more of these ‘rare’ events of severe illness and even deaths among the young.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA works to prevent sepsis, and resulting septic shock, using life-restoring molecule carbon dioxide (CO₂) and gentle vapor dissolved across the skin in a fast, painless, handheld  5-minute application — performed either in a clinical setting or in the comfort and privacy of your own home.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

Posted on Leave a comment

Effects of D’OXYVA® on overall fitness status, heart rate variability and autonomic nervous function

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

D’OXYVA® is a transdermal CO2 delivery system shown to produce higher oxygen unloading by hemoglobin1, thereby increasing oxygen-rich blood flow in the local microcirculatory system, which in turn leads to better blood perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Among its other health benefits, D’OXYVA® has been also validated as a successful means of improving the autonomic nervous system.

Share this:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

D’OXYVA® uses vaporized ultra-purified carbon dioxide to improve the body’s self-healing functions. It delivers this non-toxic compound via a non-invasive skin-delivery method, which has been shown to be more effective and safer than inhalation, a routine delivery method in hospital settings. The FDA-approved medical CO2 gets mixed with water inside the device, producing an active solution of supersaturated CO2 and water (H2O) vapor that improves skin microcirculation and/or blood circulation after dissolving into the skin2.

Good blood circulation has many important health benefits. Among the most prominent is the optimal oxygenation of bodily tissues and organs, which allows for efficient functioning of the heart, lungs and muscles. Active blood circulation also improves the immune response against disease by allowing the better transportation of white blood cells throughout the body. Furthermore, proper blood circulation improves cellular detoxification, while waste removal becomes more efficient3.

HRV4 is the variation in the time interval between consecutive heartbeats in milliseconds. It is highly influenced by hormones, metabolic and cognitive processes, exercise and stress5. A healthy heart can be identified via its HRV since it would show a constant variation between heartbeats. Therefore, HRV is an excellent measure of overall health and fitness status6.

HRV is regulated by the autonomous nervous system (ANS), by both its sympathetic (SYM) and parasympathetic (VAG) branches, and is accepted as a non-invasive marker of ANS activity7. Therefore, HRV is an interesting and noninvasive way to identify ANS imbalances. If a person is in a fight-or-flight mode, which is dominated by the sympathetic system, the variation between heartbeats will be low. If one is in a more relaxed state, this variation will be high. That is to say, the healthier the ANS, the higher the HRV, and the faster one can adapt his or her heartbeat to the circumstances, leading to more resilience and flexibility, higher stress resistance and better cardiovascular health8. HRV can also be used as a means to inform people about their lifestyle and motivate those who are considering doing something else to become healthier. HRV is typically higher when the heart is beating slowly, and lower when the heart starts to beat faster, such as during stress or exercise. The HRV naturally changes on a daily basis, based on activity and stress levels, but in chronically stressed people, the natural interplay between the two subsystems can be altered, and the body can be stuck in a sympathetically dominant fight state, with low HRV and high stress hormone levels, even at rest8.

To check HRV, the standard is to analyze a long strip of an electrocardiogram (ECG). The time between beats is called the R-R interval and is measured in milliseconds (ms). There are many ways to measure HRV, but one of the most common is the standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN). Some studies have found that in 24-hour monitoring testing, SDNN values under 50 ms are considered unhealthy, between 50-100 ms may indicate compromised health, and above 100 ms are healthy9. But exactly what these measurements indicate will vary from person to person because of their high dependency on age, gender, fitness level, medical history and genetics10.

Improving your HRV has a number of proven health benefits, including a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease11, enhanced cognitive performance and creativity12, a potentially decreased risk for Alzheimer’s13 and improved anxiety levels14. Moreover, athletes can benefit from HRV by it enhancing their athletic performance and as an indicator of the need to adjust one’s training intensity15.

That is why we chose HRV as a proxy to characterize the effects of D’OXYVA® on overall health and fitness in normal subjects. D’OXYVA®—a clinically proven16 method to improve on many health conditions, from diabetic foot ulcer improvement to pain management—was the focus of a preliminary clinical study to assess respiratory function, HRV and related autonomous system function in 13 patients (10 men, 3 women), aged 32 years, on average (32.5±12.7), with a mean height of 169±7.3 centimeters and a mean weight of 65.9±10.1 kilograms. Importantly, to be recruited for the study, the patients could not have a previous history of cardiac or respiratory disease.

The effects of D’OXYVA® were measured at several intervals after application (first after 5 minutes, then after 30 minutes and one last time an hour after CO2 application) and compared to a baseline recording. Among the recorded values were some related to respiratory function (like oxygen saturation, SpO2 and CO2 pressure and ETCO2), heart function (heart rate, RRIV and SDNN) and autonomous nervous system function (parasympathetic function VAG, sympathetic function SYM and balance ASN).

The data gathered after D’OXYVA® application showed improved blood oxygenation just 30 minutes after treatment, which was more or less maintained up to an hour after treatment. Conversely, the CO2 pressure was greatly diminished at a half hour after treatment, which is inversely correlated with the improved blood oxygenation observed at that time point. Naturally, the later small decrease in SpO2 is also reflected in the inverse change in ETCO2.

Secondly, heart function analysis showed a decreased heart rate just 5 minutes after D’OXYVA® treatment. This slight decrease in heart rate was correlated with a large decrease in normal pitch change in R-R (RRIV), which was maintained for the entire recording period and up to an hour afterward. The NN spacing standard deviation (SDNN) was not affected by the intervention, which is an indicator of the good health status of the patients included in the study.

Lastly, a range of parameters related to AN) function were examined. These included SYM and VAG function, their relative balance of activity as well as overall autonomous system function and ANS age, which is related to biological age and acts as a proxy for premature aging in the nervous system. Sympathetic function experienced a stark decrease after D’OXYVA® application, whereas parasympathetic function slightly increased over time after the treatment. The balance between SYM and VAG was mainly driven by the change in SYM and therefore followed the same dynamic.

The plot of modulation of sympathetic function shows effective SYM self-regulation, with small variations after treatment. General ANS function improved half an hour after application, whereas ANS age marginally improved after treatment, starting just 5 minutes after treatment.

In summary, the results after a single application of D’OXYVA®-mediated transdermal CO2 delivery showed increased oxygen concentration and lower carbon dioxide concentration in the blood just 30 minutes after treatment, which may persist over 60 minutes. As for heart function, a tendency was observed toward decreased RRIV and stabilization of overly high HRV, which would point to a reduction in risk of cardiac arrhythmia. The analysis of autonomous nervous system function showed a balanced sympathetic and parasympathetic tone, probably due to parasympathetic effects.

All in all, the results of this preliminary study vouch for the positive influence of D’OXYVA®-mediated transdermal CO2 delivery on blood oxygenation, heart function and autonomous system function, thereby displaying the beneficial effects of D’OXYVA® on overall health function and further supporting its use as a stress-free, complication-free, complementary method for improving HRV. Regular use of D’OXYVA®, in combination with a Mediterranean diet, good sleep, cold showers and/or deep breathing exercise like yoga17, can drive a maintained, noticeable improvement in HRV and consequently in overall health and fitness status. Especially for people under stressful life conditions or those enduring strong exercise routines, like professional sportsmen and women, D’OXYVA® offers an extra boost to their overall health by increasing their HRV values.

Bibliography

  1. Rogers, L. C., Muller-Delp, J. M. & Mudde, T. A. Transdermal delivery of carbon dioxide boosts microcirculation in subjects with and without diabetes. Information summary for healthcare professionals. Circulatory Healthcare Inc.
  2. Introducing D’OXYVA – What is D’OXYVA? D’OXYVA https://doxyva.com/about-doxyva/.
  3. Good Blood Circulation, Why Is It So Important? D’OXYVA https://doxyva.com/2019/11/02/why-good-blood-circulation-is-important-for-overall-health/ (2019).
  4. Heart rate variability. Wikipedia (2020).
  5. Kim, H.-G., Cheon, E.-J., Bai, D.-S., Lee, Y. H. & Koo, B.-H. Stress and Heart Rate Variability: A Meta-Analysis and Review of the Literature. Psychiatry Investig. 15, 235–245 (2018).
  6. What is Heart Rate Variability (HRV) & why does it matter? | Firstbeat Blog. Firstbeat https://www.firstbeat.com/en/blog/what-is-heart-rate-variability-hrv/.
  7. Ernst, G. Heart-Rate Variability—More than Heart Beats? Front. Public Health 5, (2017).
  8. MD, M. C. Heart rate variability: A new way to track well-being. Harvard Health Blog https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789 (2017).
  9. Shaffer, F. & Ginsberg, J. P. An Overview of Heart Rate Variability Metrics and Norms. Front. Public Health 5, (2017).
  10. Short-Term Heart Rate Variability—Influence of Gender and Age in Healthy Subjects. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0118308.
  11. Blumenthal, J. A. et al. Effects of Exercise and Stress Management Training on Markers of Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA 293, 1626–1634 (2005).
  12. Gruzelier, J. H., Thompson, T., Redding, E., Brandt, R. & Steffert, T. Application of alpha/theta neurofeedback and heart rate variability training to young contemporary dancers: state anxiety and creativity. Int. J. Psychophysiol. Off. J. Int. Organ. Psychophysiol. 93, 105–111 (2014).
  13. [Heart and brain — the influence of psychiatric disorders and their therapy on the heart rate variability] – Abstract – Europe PMC. http://europepmc.org/article/MED/15806437.
  14. Lee, J., Kim, J. K. & Wachholtz, A. The benefit of heart rate variability biofeedback and relaxation training in reducing trait anxiety. Hanguk Simni Hakhoe Chi Kongang Korean J. Health Psychol. 20, 391–408 (2015).
  15. Paul, M., Garg, K. & Singh Sandhu, J. Role of Biofeedback in Optimizing Psychomotor Performance in Sports. Asian J. Sports Med. 3, 29–40 (2012).
  16. CLINICAL EVIDENCE. D’OXYVA https://doxyva.com/clinical-evidence/.
  17. 5 ways to improve your Heart Rate Variability (HRV). Myithlete https://www.myithlete.com/improve-heart-rate-variability-hrv/ (2019).

Reduce unwanted doctor visits, recommended and ranked top by experts!

Posted on Leave a comment

10 Common Misconceptions About Pain Management

pain reliever

Chronic pain is a worldwide phenomenon that requires different treatment approaches for different patients. A number of common misconceptions about proper pain management exist, and these can affect the efficacy of a pain management program. Read on to learn about the case of Amy B., who required a specialized pain management approach to control her chronic pain.

Share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

Amy B. was a 67-year-old female patient with severe pain from multiple fractures and osteoarthritis. She was originally prescribed Tylenol with codeine, which did not control her pain. After the addition of the non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA[1], Amy was completely pain free within 6 weeks.

Misconception #1

All Patients Complain About Their Pain Levels to Obtain Pain Medications
Although some patients who seek pain medications to feed drug addictions do “over complain” about their pain levels, studies have consistently shown that the vast majority of legitimate pain management patients accurately describe their pain levels using a pain scale that ranges from 1 to 10.
Misconception #2

Narcotic Pain Medications Are Always the Best Chronic Pain Treatments
Many other modalities[2] can be attempted before using narcotic pain medications. These alternatives include physical therapy, massage therapy, biofeedback, stretching and exercise. In addition researchers have found that the application of the non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA significantly decreases pain, especially in patients with diabetic neuropathy.
Misconception #3

All Pain Management Patients Should Start on NSAIDs
Depending on the patient’s pain level, other medications such as opioids may be the appropriate first choice for adequate pain control.
Misconception #4

All Pain Management Patients Are Drug Addicts Who Are Seeking Drugs
Legitimate pain management patients with conditions such as severe arthritis, gout, spinal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy, or diabetic foot ulcers are not drug addicts even though they require daily pain medications. Other types of patients with conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder or actual drug addictions may seek to divert pain medications to feed their addictions.
Misconception #5

Treatment with Opioid Pain Medications Always Completely Eliminates a Patient’s Pain
The goal of pain management is to reduce a patient’s pain level using the lowest dose of opioids possible. This does not always result in complete pain relief. Other modalities such as the application of D’OXYVA can be used to help control chronic pain.
Misconception #6

If One Type of Opioid Does Not Correct Chronic Pain, No Opioids Will Ever Control Chronic Pain
This is inaccurate. For example, if codeine does not adequately control a patient’s pain, a different class of opioids such as hydrocodone may be required for pain relief.
Misconception #7

Patients Should Not Have Control over Their Opioid Pain Medications
Pain management patients should be in control of their own pain medications because they are in the best position to determine their actual pain control level and to know whether their pain medications are working.
Misconception #8

Non-Invasive Pain Control Applications Such as D’OXYVA Have No Scientific Basis
Multiple studies have shown the efficacy of non-invasive applications such as D’OXYVA in controlling acute and chronic pain.
Misconception #9

Chronic Pain Patients with Peptic Ulcer Disease Can Use NSAIDs Safely
NSAIDs should be used with care because they can exacerbate conditions like peptic ulcers or gastritis.
Misconception #10

NSAIDs Used Topically for Chronic Pain Cause GI Problems
There is no evidence that topical NSAIDs cause this side effect.
Previous
Next

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

Heart attacks during pregnancy are on the rise, study says

heart attack in pregnancy

Heart disease is known to kill nearly 420,000 women in the U.S. each year, and is the leading cause of maternal deaths. The numbers are even more staggering for African-American mothers, whose risk of dying from heart-related complications is three times higher than for white women.

“We’re seeing that there’s actually an increase in the number of heart attacks during pregnancy, and that number is going up in the United States,” Lenox Hill Hospital cardiologist Dr. Catherine Weinberg told CBS News’ Dr. Tara Narula. “We don’t exactly understand why. We also sometimes unmask disorders that we didn’t realize were present before.”

Share this post:

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

A recent study found that about one in four pregnancy or postpartum deaths are caused by cardiovascular complications – hypertensive disorders in particular affect as many as one in 10 women and cause increased risk of heart failure, heart attack, and stroke.

First-time mother Michelle Emebo experienced the dangers firsthand. In her third trimester in 2014, she was told during a routine doctor’s visit that her blood pressure was extremely high, and said the moment changed her life forever.

“When I went back the following week and my pressure was still high, that’s when I knew there was something wrong,” she said.

Emebo was soon diagnosed with gestational hypertension – high blood pressure that develops during pregnancy after 20 weeks. In severe cases, it can cause preeclampsia or eclampsia, both fatal conditions to mother and baby.

Emebo said she was clueless at the time as to what caused her hypertension, only that she gained “a lot of weight.”

Four months after giving birth, Emebo was still struggling with her blood pressure, her weight and another condition called chronic postpartum hypertension, and was prescribed a daily blood pressure pill.

Risk factors for cardiovascular disease related maternal mortality are race, ethnicity, hypertension, obesity and age over 40.  

She turned to diet and exercise as reliable methods to improve her health – she cut sodium from her diet, portion-controlled her meals and began a 5-day-per-week workout regimen. Over four years, she lost 75 pounds.

Emebo credits her daughter as motivation for getting healthy, as well as caring for her own self.

“I’m not just Sarai’s mom, I’m Michelle, too, and I have to take care of myself,” she explained. As of Winter 2019, she no longer needed blood pressure medicine.

After conquering her issue, Emebo set out to pass the warning on to other women.

“When you think of heart disease, you think of heart attack, you think of stroke,” she said, reflecting on her experience. “Hypertension is a real issue. A cardiovascular disease while pregnant is a real issue. We have to get the information out there for moms and for families.” 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin)microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

‘It literally came out of nowhere’: Mom, 39, warns others after suffering heart attack

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Jennifer Andrews was driving on a New Jersey highway last month when she suddenly suffered a massive heart attack. As she fell unconscious behind the wheel, her car careened down an embankment and stopped in heavy brush and trees. A Good Samaritan who saw what happened and followed had to resuscitate her three times to get her heart beating normally again.

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

At 39, Andrews had never experienced any heart issues or symptoms before and was “completely blindsided,” she said.

“It literally came out of nowhere,” Andrews, an executive assistant who lives in borough of Washington, New Jersey, told TODAY. “It’s extremely scary. I feel like this is something that happens to 80-year-old men.”

Andrews was even more stunned since she had just gone to her primary care doctor for her annual checkup just two weeks before the episode. All the bloodwork came back fine, as did checks of her heart rate and blood pressure, she noted. She exercised regularly and led a low-stress life.

The mother of two did have risk factors, including smoking a few cigarettes a day, being overweight and having a family history of heart disease — her father died of heart problems in his mid-50s — but said it never crossed her mind to worry about her heart at her age.

After waking up in the hospital four days after the January 9 accident, Andrews was incredulous when doctors told her she had a 100% blockage in one of her coronary arteries, requiring a stent.

“I didn’t believe them. If it wasn’t for me waking up in the hospital with the tubes in my arm and the oxygen in my nose — and I could tell I had been intubated because my throat was hurting — I would have never believed it,” she said.

Know the risk factors and symptoms

It’s possible for people to do everything right and still have heart problems sneak up on them, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist and founder of the Women’s Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. 

February is American Heart Month, an annual campaign to raise awareness of heart disease — the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S., yet many people still think of it as a “man’s illness.”

The risk goes up as people age, so heart attacks in premenopausal women are not common, but they do happen, Hayes noted. A recent study found heart attacks are on the rise in women between the ages of 35 and 54.

It leads expert to wonder: Are doctors are not paying enough attention to those women’s risk factors, or is the type of heart disease younger women develop fundamentally different than heart disease in the elderly or in men? The answer is probably a combination of both those factors, Hayes said.

Her research interest is spontaneous coronary artery dissection — a tear in a coronary artery wall — which often affects women who are otherwise healthy, with few or no risk factors for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

Hayes advised women under 50 who have suffered a heart attack with no risk factors to talk to their doctor about whether they had a SCAD or another heart attack cause not related to plaque buildup.

Hayes didn’t treat Andrews, but said it’s understandable why she would feel blindsided. A typical 39-year-old woman may be more focused on reproductive issues or the risk of breast cancer than her heart health because she probably doesn’t have any friends and family her age who have heart disease, Hayes noted.

The key for everyone is to pay attention to risk factors — including high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol levels, diabetes, excess weight, smoking and a family history of heart disease — and address the ones you can control.

For example, even light smoking — like the three or four cigarettes a day Andrews smoked before her accident — is a compelling risk factor for heart disease, Hayes said.

“But even people who optimally control all the risk factors still could have a heart attack,” Hayes said.

“Recognize it could happen and know what to do if you get the symptoms or somebody around you gets the symptoms.”

Chest pain is still the No. 1 warning sign for both sexes, but women can also experience different symptoms than men, including pain in the neck, jaw, throat, abdomen or in the upper back between the shoulder blades.

Andrews did have some upper back pain in the weeks leading up to her heart attack, but said that was typical for her and the condition was being treated by a chiropractor.

Since the heart attack, Andrews has quit smoking, is watching her salt, fat and cholesterol intake and feels fine, she said. There are new medications to take and doctors to visit during her follow-up care. The accident left her with bruising from the seat belt, but she’s recovering well.

“It was very eye-opening,” Andrews said about the ordeal, noting she was indebted to everyone who saved her life.

“I feel like ‘thank you’ isn’t enough. I don’t know what to say for them to understand how grateful I am.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

Taking D’OXYVA® daily promotes benefits related to significantly improved blood circulation, including significantly increased cardiac activity, physical fitness, metabolism, endurance, energy balance and a healthy weight.

Posted on Leave a comment

Women’s blood vessels age faster than men’s: Study

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

New research shows for the first time that women’s blood vessels, both large and small arteries, age at a faster rate than men’s.

The findings, published Wednesday in JAMA Cardiology, challenge the long-held belief that vascular disease and cardiovascular risk in women lags behind men by up to 20 years, concluding that certain vascular changes in women actually develop earlier and progress faster in women compared to men.

Share It

Share on facebook
Share on whatsapp
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

“We were inspired to take a much closer look at blood pressure trajectories over the life course in women compared to men because, at the end of the day, the vast majority of cardiovascular disease processes tend to start with blood pressure elevation as a major driving risk factor,” said Dr. Susan Cheng, director of public health research at the Smidt Heart Institute at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and senior author on the study.

The study looked at nearly 145,000 blood pressure measurements from more than 32,000 people, ranging in age from 5 to 98, over the course of four decades.

Researchers found that blood pressure started increasing in women as early as 30, and continued to rise higher than blood pressure in men throughout the women’s life span.

“Our findings suggest that all the ways by which we think about and aim to prevent or treat high blood pressure likely needs to be more tailored, for women,” Cheng said.

One of the reasons Goldberg, who was not involved in the study, cited for patients not taking their blood pressure medications is that people stop taking them if their blood pressure improves. Treating blood pressure is not like treating a pneumonia or cough, patients must continue to take blood pressure medication for them to be effective.

“We need to be more vigilant, because when high blood pressure is treated it is a way of preventing other diseases, like stroke, heart attacks and heart failure,” Goldberg said.

Dr. Manavjeet Sidhu, MD, MBA, is a chief resident physician in emergency medicine and contributor to the ABC News Medical Unit.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

D’OXYVA® improves dermal microcirculation and promotes wound healing in the diabetic foot (clinical trial update)

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Prof. Puruhito and colleagues have released the results of three observational trials showing that D’OXYVA® (Circularity Healthcare LLC), a deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator, improves vasodilation in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), boosts dermal microcirculation, and helps in the healing process of DFUs.

Share It

Share on facebook
Share on whatsapp
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Published in PRWeb

D’OXYVA® is a validated circulatory and nerve stimulant. The system was used by Prof. Puruhito for CO2 transdermal delivery, which has been shown to produce higher oxygen unloading by hemoglobin, thereby increasing oxygen-rich blood flow in the local microcirculatory system1. This improved dermal microcirculation leads, in turn, to enhanced wound healing2.

The American Diabetes Association standards of care for DFUs refer to microvascular complications and their treatment via improvements in microcirculation; therefore, Prof. Puruhito’s team set out to test CO2 transdermal delivery via D’OXYVA® in their patients. They have been gathering data since 2015, which led to the following results.

During the course of a 5-day treatment, O2 saturation increased in patients treated with transdermal CO2 in comparison to controls (15 patients/group)3 over the whole measurement range (up to 120 minutes post application). Moreover, a consistent heart rate decrease was found in patients undergoing transdermal CO2 treatment. Furthermore, the perfusion index (PI) showed an upwards tendency in the treatment group, whereas it remained stable for untreated controls. See figure 1.

diabetic wound

Figure 1: Changes observed after a 5-day transdermal CO2 treatment with D’OXYVA®. H1-H5: pre-treatment, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after; blue trace: control, orange trace: treatment. (A) Changes in O2 saturation (B) Decrease in heart rate due to treatment (C) Masimo® measurements of PI.

In light of these results, Prof. Puruhito’s team performed extra measurements of transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcPCO2), O2 saturation, and PI in the 15 patients treated with D’OXYVA® for transdermal CO2 delivery3–5. This data show that the oxygen saturation reached almost 100% in some patients, whereas the TcPCO2 remained relatively stable throughout the treatment time (120 minutes). For more detailed information, see figure 2.

Figure 2: Transcutaneous CO2 pressure (TcPCO2), O2 saturation, and PI assessment in the 15 patients subjected to transdermal CO2. (A) SENTEC TcPCO2 measurements for all patients at various time points after D’OXYVA® application (pre-treatment, 5, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after) (B) O2 saturation (C) PI.

Finally, Prof. Puruhito’s team demonstrated the positive effects of transdermal CO2 delivery via D’OXYVA® on the healing of DFUs5 (fig. 3), proving the clinical potential of this intervention to improve the quality of life of people suffering from this common complication of diabetes.

Figure 3 Wound healing after 5-day treatment with transdermal CO2 delivery via D’OXYVA® in cases of DFU Wagner-1 and Wagner-2

In conclusion, the use of a D’OXYVA® device for transdermal CO2 delivery improves the outcomes of DFUs by enhancing dermal microcirculation and increasing perfusion rates and tissue oxygenation, therefore assisting in the healing process of the ulcers typical of diabetes neuropathy.

ABOUT PROF. ITO PURUHITO

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Ito Puruhito, MD is professor in the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital as well as a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine at Universitas Airlangga (Indonesia). From 2001 to 2016, he was the rector of the aforementioned university. Prof. Puruhito finished his medicine studies at Universitas Airlangga in 1967, and in 1972 he received a doctorate degree, graduating cum laude from Frederich-Alexander University (Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany). In his native country, he developed the Department of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery at his former university, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya. In 1978, he co-founded the Indonesian Association of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery. Prof. Puruhito has authored numerous indexed research articles in Scopus, ISI-Thompson or PUBMED, and scientific presentations and written several books in Indonesian, English, and German. He acted as reviewer for peer-reviewed journals such as Medical Tribune, Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Asian Annals of Surgery, Medicinus, and many more Indonesian medical-surgical journals. Currently, apart from lecturing, Prof. Puruhito actively researches stem cells, cardiovascular medicine, and surgery at the Institute of Tropical Disease as well as some work in microcirculation. Further, he acts as coordinator of research affairs at the Department of TCV-Surgery at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital Surabaya. Since 2014, he has been the chairman of the Council of Research in the Ministry of Research Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia.

ABOUT D’OXYVA

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is a novel, clinically validated blood flow and nerve stimulant for people suffering from neuropathy. In various clinical trials, D’OXYVA® has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions.

Subjects suffering from high blood sugar have reported neuropathy pain relief minutes after D’OXYVA® was administered and long-term blood sugar level improvements after just a few weeks.

Rapid and gentle skin delivery (over-the-skin) with the D’OXYVA® lightweight, handheld device has prompted improvements in blood microcirculation or PI by 33%* on average in all participants. Lasting results have been measured at 5-60 minutes and up to 4 hours after a single 5-minute D’OXYVA® delivery on the skin surface without reduction in PI levels.6

Posted on Leave a comment

Fibromyalgia and Microcirculation: What Fibro Patients Need To Know

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

If you’ve been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, you know how debilitating the disease’s widespread nerve pain can be to your body. New research shows that microcirculation problems may be among the causes of fibro nerve pain. 

Share It

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

The concept of microcirculation—the circulation of blood in your body’s smallest blood vessels—may be a key to unlocking the mysteries of fibromyalgia. 

The Latest Research on Microcirculation and Fibromyalgia

As more patients are diagnosed with fibromyalgia each year, research on the disease’s causes and potential treatments are increasing rapidly. A study was done on exactly how blood circulates near tender points in the body in fibromyalgia patients. Circulation was found to be poor near tender points, leading researchers to believe that microcirculation near the surface of the skin is at play when it comes to fibromyalgia pain.

Many people who have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia find that it’s harder to exercise than it was before they began experiencing fibromyalgia symptoms. Studies have shown that microcirculation problems can contribute to exercise intolerance and muscular fatigue in fibromyalgia patients. Although exercise has been shown to help with fibromyalgia symptoms, it can be hard to use movement as an effective treatment when it can also lead to painful flare-ups. This can be disheartening for fibro patients who are trying their best to manage their stress and symptoms through exercise. 

Improving Microcirculation in Fibromyalgia Patients

If you think some of your fibromyalgia symptoms may be related to microcirculation problems, you’re not alone. Many fibro patients are finding that improving microcirculation relieves some of their fibro symptoms. Let’s take a look at some of the options for improving microcirculation: 

  • Exercise – As stated above, exercise can be a great way to get the blood moving and improve microcirculation. However, many fibro patients find that they need to experience symptom relief before they feel well enough to exercise. 
  • Heat therapy – Spending time in a sauna or hot tub or using a heating pad can get your blood flowing directly beneath the skin. Although this is a short-term solution, it can provide relief to people who need assistance with microcirculation. 
  • D’OXYVA – A fairly new innovation in the world of microcirculation, D’OXYVA is a transdermal delivery application that significantly improve microcirculation, with validated results to give relief from pain to patients who need it most and are unable to get help with microcirculation through exercise. Most fibromyalgia patients find that they achieve significant pain relief after using D’OXYVA for 2-7 days. 

If you suffer from fibromyalgia, you’re not alone. Help is available. Using a combination of exercise, heat therapy, and D’OXYVA may give you the relief you’re looking for. 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

Improving Microcirculation for Weight Reduction in Obesity

weight loss obesity

Obesity, by definition, is a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 kg per square meter or greater. The prevalence of obesity has increased and is now thought to affect more than one third of the adult population.[1] Recent studies have shown that obesity has an adverse effect on microcirculation and is an important risk factor for the development of many health problems, such as metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, elevated lipid levels, high blood pressure and increased abdominal girth), ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and other cardiovascular diseases.[2] The following case demonstrates how improving microcirculation can help with weight reduction in obese patients.

Brenda V was a 39-year-old white female patient with severe obesity and a BMI of 52.4 kilograms per square meter.

Brenda’s past medical history was significant because it included a history of morbid obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, gout, and depression.

She revealed that she could only walk for one block without severe shortness of breath and had to sleep on 2 pillows at night.

On physical examination, her weight was 340 pounds, and her height was 5 feet, 1 inch.

Her blood pressure was 180/105, and her cardiovascular exam revealed severe pitting edema of both legs.

Brenda’s abdomen was distended and morbidly obese with decreased bowel sounds.

Her laboratory exam showed a hemoglobin A1C level of 12.5% (normal is less than 5.7%) and a triglyceride level of 600 mg/dl (normal is less than 150 mg/dl).

Brenda was put on a regimen of diet, increased exercise, and the use of the peripheral deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA[3] for 5 minutes per day, 5 times a week, for a 3 month period.

After this treatment she had the following improvements:

  • Increased physical activity
  • Decreased blood sugar levels
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Decreased triglyceride levels
  • Decreased HgbA1C levels
  • Increased cardiac function
  • Increased endurance
  • Increased physical fitness
  • Decreased depression
  • Massively decreased weight
  • Increased mobility

      BUY D’OXYVA

How Does Obesity Affect Microcirculation?

Microcirculation[4] refers to the body’s smallest branching blood vessels (arterioles, venules, and capillaries with internal diameters less than 100 microns) that supply oxygen to and remove wastes products from the body’s tissues.

Microcirculation responds to changes in metabolic demands or sympathetic nervous system activation by either expanding or contracting to increase or decrease perfusion levels.

Early in the course of obesity, dysfunctional changes begin to appear in microcirculatory endothelial lining cells”.

These changes are caused by oxidative stress and inflammation of the microcirculation[5] and are now thought to lead to both insulin resistance and hypertension.

Conclusion

Obesity has been found to lead to microcirculatory dysfunction, which causes severe health problems, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and various cardiovascular diseases. Reducing obesity through a program of strict dietary control, increased exercise and the use of D’OXYVA to enhance microcirculation can significantly improve general health and reduce the risk of potentially lethal health complications.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.