Posted on Leave a comment

What You Need to Know About Non-Healing Wounds

Chronic wounds are wounds that do not heal in a normal amount of time. This delay in healing can be due to a number of factors. Read on to learn about the case of a 63-year-old female patient with a large chronic wound on her lower, left extremity that was resistant to healing.Lena was a 63-year-old, White female who had developed a large, non-healing wound on her lower, right leg. She could not remember what had caused the lesion other than having dropped a heavy mirror on her right shin several weeks earlier. Lena had a past medical history of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart failure, liver failure, and blood clots in her legs. She had been a cigarette smoker for the last 50 years.Lena’s physical examination showed a large, deep, non-healing wound on her right shin. Surgical treatment and debridement, along with antibiotic treatment, had failed to result in significant treatment. After 8 weeks of adjunctive application with deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA[1], the chronic wound improved without any further complications.
Main Reasons Chronic Wounds Do Not Heal
Chronic wounds normally do not heal for a number of reasons, including[2]:
  • Increased age of the patient leading to slower healing time
  • Decreased functioning of the immune system due to illnesses or chronic disease processes
  • Decreased circulation due to diabetes affecting the peripheral vascular system
  • Decreased circulation due to peripheral vascular disease
  • Peripheral neuropathy leading to loss of sensation and the inability to feel wound and ulcer formation
  • Insufficiency of the venous system leading to pooling of blood in the extremities and resultant poor perfusion
  • Poor nutrition leading to decreased ability to heal wounds normally
  • Impaired mobility leading to impaired limb perfusion
  • Increased general stress levels leading to decreased wound healing
  • Decreased general health causing general debilitation and loss of normal healing ability
Variations of Chronic Wounds

There are several different variations of chronic wounds, including pressure ulcers, arterial and venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers.

Pressure ulcers[3], such as “bed sores,” occur when an area of the skin is under constant pressure, often when a patient is confined to a bed or wheelchair.

This causes the skin to break down in areas such as the coccyx, heel, ankles, and dorsum of the foot.

Arterial ulcers[4] form when there is a blockage in an artery causing reduction in blood flow to the lower extremities and subsequent reduction in the supply of oxygen to the affected area.

Venous ulcers[5] occur when the valves within veins become damaged leading to pooling of blood in the veins and reduced blow flow and oxygenation to the extremities.

Diabetic ulcers occur when high blood sugar levels cause damage to the nerves, especially in the lower extremities.

This leads to numbness, causing the patient to ignore cuts or ulcers until they enlarge, often becoming infected.

Diabetes also depresses the immune system, leading to slowed healing.

Treatments for Chronic Non-Healing Wounds

There are a number of treatments for non-healing wounds [7]. These include:

  • Antibiotics to treat bacterial infections
  • Antifungals to treat fungal infections
  • Hyperbaric oxygen treatments to improve chronic wound healing
  • Surgical debridement to remove necrotic tissue
  • Specialty wrapping of chronic wounds
  • Skin grafting to close chronic wounds
  • D’OXYVA[8]skin delivery deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator as a wound solution to improve blood flow and oxygenation to chronic wound areas

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) provides advanced, painless, complete and fast wound care solution. It has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound improvement to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA  improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

16 Signs You’re at Risk for Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious, chronic illness that can result in the loss of limbs or life if left untreated. There are many signs that you are at risk for developing the disease, and it’s important to know what they are. If you experience any or all of the following and can’t find a suitable explanation, make an appointment with your doctor.

If you get plenty of sleep every night but still go through bouts of fatigue throughout the day, it may be a sign you’re pre-diabetic.
Having to pee often or a lot (and even wetting the bed at night) is a classic sign you’re at risk for diabetes. If you begin to suspect you’re outside the norm, make a note every time you go to the bathroom and take the information to your doctor, who will let you know whether you need further testing.
Excessive thirst (when you’re not also doing a lot of sweating) is also somewhat suspicious. Track water intake for a few days while you wait to see your doctor. It could be an early symptom of type 2 diabetes, which has subtle signs, like thirst and frequent trips to the bathroom. Don’t ignore them.
It can be hard to separate “eating when you’re hungry” from “emotional eating.” But if you find yourself having actual hunger pangs often and beyond mealtimes, it may mean you’re at risk for diabetes.Bring it up with your doctor and track any other symptoms of risk, so she can determine whether more testing is advised.
A big risk for type 2 diabetes is if you have a terrible diet, one that is high in sugar, carbohydrates, and lots of processed foods. If you know you don’t eat well and especially if you show any other signs that you’re at risk for diabetes, talk to your doctor about it. Yes, you will be advised to make better choices. But you should know whether you’re headed to diabetes territory — or worse, that you’re already there.
Blurry vision is often one of the first signs of diabetes. If you can’t explain away fuzzy letters, or have the sudden inability to read texts and signs that had been readable before, flag this with your doctor.Interestingly, insulin treatments for diabetes also can blur vision. Know that your eyes are a window into your health. See the signs.
There can be several causes for a lack of saliva in your mouth (also known as “dry mouth”), and high levels of glucose is one of them. This puts you at risk for (or is a symptom of) diabetes.There are some pharmaceutical treatments for dry mouth. But before treating it, be sure to talk to your doctor about what you’re experiencing so that you can be tested for diabetes.In any case, dry mouth can lead to cavities and an increase in yeast infections in your mouth, so do not ignore it.
If you find that your clothes are getting tighter and tighter, particularly around the waist, you might be increasing your risk for developing diabetes. Talk to your doctor about it and take their advice, especially if changes in your eating and exercise routine are in order.
Headaches alone aren’t serious, but if you get them often enough it might be a sign that your blood sugar is out of whack — which may be a sign of diabetes. If you suspect this might be the case, or if you find the headaches are becoming regular and aren’t due to sleep issues or dehydration, bring it up with your doctor.
Mood swings have long been an early symptom of a hyperglycemia attack and type 2 diabetes. The mood swings might also be a consequence of suffering from other symptoms of the disease. Either way, don’t ignore them: Moodiness and depression might be your body telling you something really isn’t right.
People with diabetes often take much longer to heal from scrapes and cuts. They are also at risk for frequent infections.If you experience any of these symptoms, it could mean something else is going on. See your doctor to rule out or diagnose diabetes.
A sedentary lifestyle puts you at risk for lots of health ailments, including diabetes. Without regular exercise and movement, you’re at risk for a not well-regulated metabolic system, which, in turn, holds on to fatty deposits. That puts you in the higher risk category for developing type 2 diabetes.Do what you can to prevent it.
There are a number of specific skin problems related to diabetes. One particularly visible one is the darkening and thickening of skin, especially in the skin folds. Called acanthosis nigricans, it appears mostly in people who are very overweight.Sometimes, the skin becomes slightly raised and appears velvety. Other times, it looks like small warts on the side or back of the neck, armpits or in the breast and groin area.
If you’ve experienced sudden (and unintentional) weight loss, you might be at risk for diabetes. The lowered weight, in these cases, is due to high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and thyroid problems — all of which are serious and should be understood and treated by a doctor.So, while your jeans might start fitting better, this sudden and dramatic weight loss is nothing to get excited about.
High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerve pathways that send signals to the hands and feet. Hands and/or feet that feel tingly might be showing early signs of this damage and may certainly be a symptom of diabetes.Don’t ignore the discomfort or blame your shoes. Make an appointment with your doctor and get tested.
High blood sugar changes the balance in our bloodstreams and bodies, and makes us less effective in fighting off infections. Consequently, people with diabetes often experience urinary tract infections and yeast infections.If you haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes but you’re battling both often enough, let your doctor know. These conditions might be a sign that you’re at risk for developing full-blown type 2.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

Healthy Choices and Technology Equals Better Diabetes Management

By Justin Bennet

According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.5 million people are diagnosed with diabetes every year, 84.1 million Americans are considered prediabetic, and diabetes is in the top 10 causes of death in the US. These are alarming statistics, which can be unsettling if you have diabetes. However, living with a chronic condition in the 21st century means that you have access to technology and information that wasn’t available even as recently as the 1990s.

Smart Tech for Diabetics

Technology has done so much for medicine. There are now robots that can assist with surgery and devices you can wear to monitor everything from your heart rate to how much you sleep at night. Apple’s Series 4 smartwatch, for example, can output an ECG directly on the screen. It will also let you call for help via an emergency SOS function if you get into a bad situation.

Perhaps more importantly, this and other fitness trackers, such as the Fitbit, can help you keep tabs on your exercise routine by counting your steps and calculating your average active time each day. Knowing how much movement you get is paramount to keeping your body fit and healthy. Exercise, according to EndocrineNet, can help you manage your blood glucose levels.

Technology can go one step further by allowing you to take your exercise routines with you no matter where you are. Apps such as MyFitnessPal and 8Fit can encourage you to make healthy exercise choices, and they can also help you monitor what you eat, which is another crucial element related to diabetes management.

Your Actions Matter

While technology can give you the tools to take control of your health, ultimately, it is your actions that direct the path of your well-being.

A few things you can do to stay healthy are:

  • Maintain a relationship with your doctor. Your primary care provider will likely be the one to diagnose you with diabetes. Once the condition is established, they will refer you to an endocrinologist, who may work at an independent office, the hospital, or at a diabetes care center. Make sure to keep your appointments with both, and don’t be afraid to ask questions about caring for yourself. If you have yet to find an endocrinologist, sites like HealthGrades can help you make an informed decision.
  • Exercise and eat right. We’ve already mentioned how technology can help you exercise and eat right, but both of these deserve special emphasis. When you have diabetes, it is not enough to simply eat the right foods; you also have to avoid the wrong ones. Things like white bread, French fries, and sports drinks might seem innocent enough, but they can send your blood sugar skyrocketing while expanding your waistline. You’ll also want to enhance your diet with diabetes-safe supplements to help you manage your weight and keep it within an acceptable range. Nutrition is what gives your body the energy to function, and adding polyphenols and other lesser-known nutrients to your daily intake is an important step in managing your condition.
  • Take your medicine on time. If your doctor has put you on a prescription for your diabetes, it’s important to take it at the same time every day. This is another area where technology can enhance your self-care efforts via medication reminder apps. Pharmacist Christina Tarantola lists several of her favorites and also cautions that around half of all prescriptions are taken incorrectly.

When it comes to diabetes management, technology can get you halfway there. However, what you choose to do with it and the lifestyle decisions you make mean the difference between living with your condition and letting your condition rule your life.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Do you own a wearable fitness tracker? Is it really a fitness technology or just more of a fad? If your wearable records heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar, blood flow (perfusion index), blood oxygen (SpO2), blood pH, we challenge you to prove that you have the best wearable by testing its efficiency with D’OXYVA.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

Results of improved blood flow (perfusion index) is visible in just after 5 minutes of D’OXYVA therapy and on its highest just after 30 minutes!

Are you up for the challenge? Register below to get further details! Amazing prizes await!

Posted on Leave a comment

Prevention of Amputations in Diabetics

Prevention of Amputations in Diabetics

A major risk of having diabetes is the possibility of requiring an amputation. Most frequently, amputations due to diabetes first involve the great toe with worsening gangrene, which leads to amputation of the foot, amputation of the leg below the knee, and then amputation of the leg above the knee. The following is a case study of Douglas, who was a diabetic patient who required an amputation of his lower leg beneath the knee in order to survive.

Case of a Sixty-Three-Year-Old Man with an Amputation of the Left Lower Leg from Uncontrolled Diabetes

Douglas was a sixty-three-year-old patient with a past medical history that was significant for Type 2 diabetes mellitus and high blood pressure with an inability to walk more than two blocks without shortness of breath. Because his blood sugars were continually out of control even on insulin, Douglas developed damage to the nerves in his feet (peripheral neuropathy). This led to his inability to feel an ulcer forming on the tip of his left great toe. In addition, since his diabetes led to damage to the microcirculation (smallest blood vessels) in his feet, his ability to rapidly improve  from the ulcer was significantly delayed. Within forty-five days of the first occurrence of the blister, it became infected, which led to gangrene and sepsis and admission into the intensive care unit. The gangrene kept spreading, requiring first the amputation of his left great toe, then the amputation of his left foot, and finally the amputation of his entire left leg below the left knee. This case demonstrates how the extreme and potentially deadly risk of leg amputations in diabetics can be reduced through early diagnosis of the problem and aggressive preventative care, including the use of D’OXYVA[1].

D’OXYVA is a peripheral and noninvasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator that dilates the microcirculation (D’OXYVA delivers pharmaceutical grade CO2 and water vapor transdermally (through the skin), dilating the smallest veins, arteries, and capillaries while increasing peripheral blood flow to the lower extremities. D’OXYVA is a pain reliever that is given for fast pain relief treatments, which are known to reduce pain and chronic conditions.

Risk Factors for Amputations in Diabetics

In a study published in the Journal of Developing Countries in 2008, it was found that, of 146 diabetic patients studied who had amputations of the foot, 74% had had diabetes for two to forty years.

In addition, forty-seven percent of the patients who were studied had ischemia (reduced blood flow), and forty-four percent had neuropathy (reduced nerve function) of the foot involved.[2]

How to Decrease the Risk of an Amputation Due to Diabetes?

Steps you can take to decrease the risk of an amputation if you are diabetic [3] include:

  • Keep your blood sugars well under control to decrease the risk of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.
  • Check blood sugars as directed by your physician.
  • Check your feet and toes for changes in temperature or feeling every day.
  • Examine your feet daily for cracks, blisters, cuts, redness, white areas, thick calluses, and different changes in color.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Stay on a Diabetic diet.
  • Increase daily exercise levels.
  • Continue to take all prescribed medications.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound improve and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA eliminated pain and improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

Why Good Blood Circulation Is Important for Overall Health

Proper blood circulation is the most important function of the human body, and it can play a very big role in one’s overall health. One of the vital components of the body, which is involved in this function, is the heart.

People often underestimate the important role of lifestyle choices on blood circulation, which can be significantly hindered by those choices. The following can negatively affect blood circulation:

  • Smoking
  • Not doing regular physical exercise
  • Leaving blood clots untreated
  • Having certain illnesses like heart diseases or diabetes

Patients suffering from poor blood circulation issues must consult Circularity Healthcare for advice and treatment.

The following are ways that blood circulation can impact a person’s health:

Benefits of good blood circulation

The following are a few benefits of good blood circulation:

  1. The body can maintain healthy oxygen and blood flow, which will allow the heart, lungs and muscles to function properly and efficiently.
  2. The body can avoid and fight diseases and sicknesses. In addition, white blood cells in the immune system can be transported around the body as needed.
  3. The organs will remain in proper working order and help remove waste from the body.

Risks of poor blood circulation

The following are a few effects of having poor blood circulation:

  1. One may feel a lack of energy, inability to concentrate and excessive tiredness.
  2. Limited oxygen flow to the brain can cause memory glitches.
  3. Women may suffer from hair loss or alopecia.
  4. Men may suffer from erectile dysfunction.
  5. Sores and cuts may take much longer to heal.
  6. Poor blood circulation may cause amputation of the affected limb.

 

How can one improve circulation?

To improve blood circulation, a person needs to make a few lifestyle changes. The following tips can help:

  1. Doing yoga involves the stretching and bending of the body to different postures for a certain duration. In the beginning, it may be little difficult, but soon with regular practice, one can achieve the desired results.
  2. Massages can be another great way of relaxing and unwinding. This can also help in bonding well with a partner.
  3. Engaging in certain cardiovascular exercises can help one maintain a healthy weight and can improve blood circulation.
  4. It is also important to keep the body well hydrated by drinking enough liquids, including water, to flush out all the toxins present in the blood.
  5. Many people are not aware that eating seafood can also improve blood circulation because of the omega-3 fatty acids it contains. A few of the healthiest choices are salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines.

People suffering from poor blood circulation always risk getting blood clots and must contact a physician or healthcare professional for proper advice on improving blood circulation.

      BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is the first of its kind biotech solution. D’OXYVA has been clinically validated for a variety of significant and rare health, athletic, and cosmetic benefits with record time and cost savings. The FDA-cleared medical CO2 and gentle vapor dissolves in a molecular form in the skin to improve skin perfusion pressure or blood circulation.

Posted on Leave a comment

The Many Options for Non-Invasive Treatments in Pain Management You Didn’t Know

Many patients suffer from chronic pain, with little or no relief from opioids, physical therapy or even surgical treatments. For example, Ritchie was an athletic 35-year-old man who had been diagnosed with a condition called Osgood-Schlatter’s[1] Disease at the age of 15. This condition, which is a result of rapid lower extremity bone growth in adolescents, resulted in Ritchie’s suffering with bilateral knee pain and swelling below his kneecaps. At the age of 17, Ritchie underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right knee to remove damaged cartilage. Despite this treatment, he remained in chronic pain that was unrelieved by pain medication, anti-inflammatories or physical therapy. After his physician prescribed a 7-week course of daily D’OXYVA[2] treatment, Ritchie became pain free and was able to resume all of his former sports activities, including tennis and golf.

How Common is Chronic Pain?

According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health[3]chronic pain (pain lasting more than 3 months) is extremely common, affecting more than 25 million American adults every day.

In addition, at least 40 million American adults suffer from non-daily but severe chronic pain.

Patients with severe chronic pain were found to generally suffer from more chronic health problems and more disability than patients with less severe pain.

What Causes Chronic Pain?

Chronic pain can result from an injury or from a disease or condition, such as one of the following:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Migraine Headaches
  • Cancer
  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Post-Surgical Pain

 

Non-Invasive Treatment Options for Chronic Pain

The following have been found to be useful in the treatment of chronic pain:

  • Acupuncture
  • Massage Therapy
  • Comfrey
  • Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction
  • Progressive Relaxation
  • Spinal Manipulation
  • Yoga
  • Herbal Products, such as cayenne pepper, lavender essential oil, white willow bark and devil’s claw
  • Electromagnetic Therapy
  • Biofeedback
  • Hypnotherapy
  • Meditation
  • Tai Chi

 

The Use of D’OXYVA in the Treatment of Chronic Pain

Microcirculation refers to the blood flow in the smallest blood vessels of the body, which are the venules (smallest veins) and the capillaries (connect venules and arterioles). When the microcirculation is compromised or blocked and blood flow to the nerves is reduced, chronic pain can ensue.

D’OXYVA is a commercially available non-invasive deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator that when applied to the thumb delivers a high level of pharmaceutical grade carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor.

The CO2 diffuses through the skin and is delivered through the blood stream, travelling to the smallest blood vessels of the body, where it has a vasodilating effect[4] and acts as a nerve stimulant that helps relieve neurogenic pain.

Diabetic patients with uncontrolled blood sugar have reported neuropathy pain relief within minutes of administration of the D’OXYVA device.

In summary, D’OXYVA is an excellent pain reliever for many different types of chronic pain.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) has achieved over 90%* elimination of all sorts of chronic pain in 100% of subjects either the same day or in a few days, such as from a very high 8 to a very low 1 on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS).

Pain-free life is here. Beyond major clinical outcomes for mild to extremely severe conditions, even when strong opioid-based painkillers were ineffective, new and long-term users of D’OXYVA reported relief of persistent long-term chronic pain in 2 – 7 days associated with: Neuropathy, fibromyalgia, chemo-, and radiation therapy, chronic wounds, arthritis, osteoporosis, migraine headaches, and lower back pain.

Posted on Leave a comment

Defects in Microcirculation and the Effect on Wound Healing: New Non-Invasive Treatments

The effects of defects in and poor functioning of the microcirculation on wound healing, especially in diabetic patients, can be devastating and life changing. As one particular example, Joseph L was a 63-year-old White male with a 24-year history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, elevated cholesterol and arthritis. Joseph had been taking insulin for the past 12 years but his blood sugar levels were still poorly controlled.

On physical exam, Joseph had several very large, oozing and foul smelling deep ulcers located on the dorsum (top) of the left foot. After 8 weeks of intensive therapy utilizing the non-invasive D’OXYVA transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator, Joseph’s ulcers healed entirely and he avoided amputation of his left foot. Read on to learn more about this new non-invasive wound treatment that helps in wound healing.

 

What is the microcirculation?

The microcirculation refers to the smallest blood vessels in the body that supply oxygen to the tissues and remove waste products. This includes the arterioles, the venules and the capillaries. When the vessels of the microcirculation become damaged, it leads to decreased blood flow with lower oxygen blood levels and resultant damage to the skin resulting in a wound or ulcer.

Risk Factors for the Creation of Chronic Wounds

Patients with the following risk factors are at greater risk for non-healing wounds or ulcers (ulcers are the most common type of chronic wounds):

  • A history of decreased blood flow to a specific area (ischemia)
  • A history of uncontrolled diabetes (which leads to poor circulation, nerve damage and breakage of the skin)
  • A history of uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • A history of high cholesterol and atherosclerosis (cholesterol plaques in the arteries)
  • A history of blood clots (thrombosis)

 

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers are a common complication of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.1 Chronically elevated blood sugar levels damage the microcirculation of the lower extremities, which leads to ischemia and neuropathy (damage to the nerves). Diabetic patients often lose feeling in the feet and so are not aware of friction and pressure, which leads to breaks in the skin. This subsequently leads to open wounds that often do not heal over a 30 day period. These wounds can then become infected, leading to gangrene and eventual amputation.

 

An Example of a New Non-Invasive Treatment to Enhance Wound Healing

D’OXYVA is a non-invasive transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator that delivers FDA-approved ultra-purified CO2 molecules which diffuse through the skin leading to increased skin perfusion. In studies of the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers with D’OXYVA, increased diabetic wound healing was observed with wound closure often observed within 5 weeks.

 

Conclusion

Chronic conditions like uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension can cause damage to the microcirculation, which leads to delayed wound healing. New treatment methods like D’OXYVA deliver transdermal CO2-enhanced oxygen and nutrients to wound areas through the microcirculation. This speeds up wound healing and wound closure and helps avoid devastating complications such as amputations.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound healing and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

In addition, D’OXYVA eliminated pain and improved quality of life such as sleep, appetite and mood in just a week in 100% of subjects. No adverse events of any kind were reported during, and years after the studies.

Posted on Leave a comment

How to Evaluate Microcirculation in Diabetics

Evaluating microcirculation in diabetics early on can help to develop a treatment plan that can help avoid complications like amputations. In the case of patient Rose D, early intervention helped save her great toe from amputation. Rose was a 63-year-old woman with a history of obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and severe diabetes with uncontrolled blood sugar levels. After suffering from an ingrown toenail, she later developed a large, deep, and bleeding ulcer on the tip of her left great toe. Analysis at a vascular surgery clinic clearly showed she was suffering from microcirculation malfunction due to her uncontrolled diabetes. Rose participated in a treatment regimen, consisting of strict blood sugar control and treatment with the transdermal vasodilator D’OXYVA, which effectively healed her ulcer and prevented amputation of her left great toe.

 

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is not able to produce the hormone insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, leading to abnormally high blood sugar levels. Elevated blood sugars can then cause damage to the large and small blood vessels supplying the eyes, feet, kidneys, heart, and nervous system, leading to end organ damage and organ failure.

Symptoms of Diabetic Complications in the Feet

Symptoms of diabetes mellitus-related foot complications include the following:

  • Changes in the skin color of the feet
  • Ankle or foot swelling
  • Numbness of the feet or toes
  • Leg pain
  • Open sore on the feet
  • Slow healing of wounds or ulcers
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Fungal infections of the toenails
  • Corns or calluses that bleed
  • Dryness and cracking of the heel


Avoiding Diabetic Foot Ulcers

The risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers can be reduced by

  • Wearing appropriate shoes
  • Checking feet for cracks, redness, or ulcers daily
  • Carefully controlling and checking blood sugars
  • Reducing risk factors like smoking and drinking alcohol
  • Monitoring cholesterol levels
  • Reducing friction and abnormal pressure on the feet
  • Taking all possible measures to increase blood flow D’OXYVA


How Does Diabetes Affect Microcirculation?

Microcirculation refers to the very small blood vessels that branch off from larger blood vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen and remove CO2 from the organs of the body. In diabetes, the chronically high blood sugar levels cause damage to the microcirculation1 through sclerosis (scarring) of the small blood vessel walls. This causes damage to both organs involved and the nerves supplying them. When the nerves are damaged in areas like the foot, there is a loss of what is known as protective sensation and a resultant failure to respond to normal pressures and irritations, thus leading to ulcers.


Risk of Amputations in Diabetes

Recent studies by the American Podiatric Medical Association2 indicate that approximately 15% of patients with diabetes will eventually develop ulcers of the feet, with 14% to 24% of those patients ending up with amputations. Each year, over 100,000 lower limbs are amputated, with most resulting from diabetic complications. After one amputation, the risk of needing another amputation in 3 to 5 years increases to about 50%.


Methods to Evaluate the Microcirculation in Diabetes

Method 1 – Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension

Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension (TOT)refers to a noninvasive method to assess blood flow in the microcirculation. TOT works by measuring the amount of oxygen molecules transferred to the microcirculation of the skin after heating it to 40 degrees Celsius.

Method 2  Skin Pulp Blood Flow

Skin pulp blood flow refers to the amount of blood flow in the pulp areas of the toes. This can be evaluated either by laser doppler fluxmetry, which measures the flow of red blood cells, or by comparing blood flows after administering a vasodilator (vasoreactivity).


Summary

Patients with severely reduced blood flow due to microcirculation damage from type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing complications such as painful foot ulcers. This is due to reduced blood flow and nerve damage, which prevent avoidance of undue friction and rubbing. Evaluating microcirculation dysfunction due to diabetes early in the course of the disease and treatment with modalities like D’OXYVA can help avoid complications like amputations.

          BUY D’OXYVA

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Clinical studies with D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) have shown* extraordinary results for the role of transdermal non-invasive wound care using ultra-purified, non-toxic FDA-cleared molecules, such as CO2, especially when all other approaches failed.

In an ongoing multi-year, multi-country, multi-center, randomized clinical trial on patients with diabetic foot ulcers, D’OXYVA has demonstrated speeding up diabetic wound healing and ultimately wound closure to an average of 5 weeks**.

Posted on Leave a comment

Prior Stroke and Other Cerebrovascular Risk Factors Linked with Parkinson’s Disease

Medical conditions and health habits that affect blood flow in the brain—or cerebrovascular risk factors—are associated with a subsequent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.

The findings, published Aug. 29 in the Annals of Neurology, opens the door to investigating whether better management of cerebrovascular risk factors such as prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes and tobacco use, may help to prevent Parkinson’s disease.

The link between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s disease is “similar to the already established relationship between such risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease, although slightly attenuated,” said senior study author Dr. Babak Navi, the Florence Gould Foundation Research Scholar for Discovery in Stroke, an associate professor of neurology in the Department of Neurology and an associate professor of neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine.

While much of the public is already aware that cerebrovascular risk factors increase the odds of developing Alzheimer’s disease, people don’t know that these same factors could put them at risk for Parkinson’s, said Dr. Navi, who is chief of the Division of Stroke and Hospital Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, where he is also an associate attending neurologist. “I think new knowledge about this association is empowering because it gives doctors and their patients another reason to get cerebrovascular risk factors under control.”

Parkinson’s disease is a prevalent and disabling condition, said Dr. Benjamin Kummer, lead author and a vascular neurology fellow at Weill Cornell Medicine when the study was conducted. About 650,000 Americans are currently living with Parkinson’s, a neurodegenerative disease that can cause debilitating tremors, the slowing of movements and changes in speech, among other symptoms. While the study did find an association between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s, “it did not find causation,” cautioned Dr. Kummer, who is now an assistant professor of neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and a clinical informaticist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,035,546 people age 66 years or older who enrolled in Medicare. These patients were evaluated for one or more of the following 14 cerebrovascular disease risk factors: prior stroke, atrial fibrillation, coronary heart disease, high cholesterol (also known as hyperlipidemia), hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart valve disease, obstructive sleep apnea, tobacco use and alcohol abuse.

During a five-year period, 15,531 of the patients, or about 1.5 percent, received a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis, while 81,974, or nearly 8 percent, developed Alzheimer’s disease.

While alcohol abuse and hyperlipidemia were not associated with Parkinson’s disease, the other 12 risk factors were. Notably, prior stroke and obstructive sleep apnea increased the relative risk of developing Parkinson’s by 55 percent and 65 percent, respectively, Dr. Navi said.

The strong association with stroke may exist because Parkinson’s disease can sometimes arise from strokes that occur in a region of the brain called the basal ganglia, which is responsible for voluntary movement, among other functions, Dr. Navi said. Additionally, prior stroke, which is caused by blockages of blood flow to the brain and can damage neurons, is probably the most severe cerebrovascular risk factor. “If you have a stroke, you have cerebrovascular disease,” he said.

Obstructive sleep apnea can increase a person’s risk of hypertension or stroke, which may be why the sleep disorder was closely linked with Parkinson’s. The association of obstructive sleep apnea with Parkinson’s disease was even stronger than Alzheimer’s, Dr. Navi said.

All 14 of the cerebrovascular risk factors were associated with Alzheimer’s, confirming this already well-known and strong association, said Dr. Navi.

As a control group, the researchers assessed the rate of renal colic, or pain in the urinary tract from kidney stones, anticipating that this condition would not be associated with cerebrovascular risk factors. “We looked at renal colic and found that most risk factors were not associated with it, which ensured the validity of our model,” Dr. Navi said.

The study also improves upon prior research by being larger and nationally representative and looking at essentially all major cerebrovascular risk factors as opposed to just one or two, Dr. Navi said.

Going forward, researchers need to establish what cellular and molecular mechanisms underlie the link between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s disease pathology, said study co-author Dr. Costantino Iadecola, director of the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, the Anne Parrish Titzell Professor of Neurology and a professor of neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medicine.

One avenue of exploration is how damage to the blood vessels of the brain may affect alpha-synuclein. This protein helps neurons communicate with one another and has been linked to Parkinson’s disease, Dr. Iadecola said. “Scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine are well positioned to look at this completely new area of research,” he said. “If we can understand the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s, we are more likely to develop disease-modifying treatments.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

Posted on Leave a comment

The Importance of Microcirculation in Wound Healing

The importance of microcirculation in wound healing cannot be overemphasized. Microcirculation enhances blood flow for better health benefits. D’OXYVA helps actualize the efficient flow of blood in the body. D’OXYVA utilizes carbon dioxide (CO2) and soft water vapor, popularly accepted as a natural vasodilator, to aid chronic wound healing processes. This enhances skin microcirculation and pressure, which bring about faster wound healing. Before we proceed to the core importance of microcirculation in wound healing, let’s look at the real meaning of microcirculation and how it relates to healing.

What Does Microcirculation Imply?

A healthy body is able to replace and renew injured tissues and heal wounds easily, and this can be achieved through effective and efficient blood flow. Microcirculation is the flow of blood through the tiniest blood vessels—the venules, capillaries, and arteriolesn the circulatory system.

In other words, microcirculation is the bridge between blood and single cells that supply oxygen and nutrients to the human body. Without proper blood flow, the body is prone to health dangers. Apart from the cornea, microcirculation exists in all tissues and organs. Microcirculation in wound healing can be made more effective if the enormous benefits of D’OXYVA are properly utilized.

What is the Function of Microcirculation in Wound Healing?

As mentioned, the role of microcirculation is enormously important for the speedy healing of chronic wounds. The primary function of microcirculation is the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, and it also enhances the removal of carbon dioxide. The core aim of microcirculation in wound healing is to regulate blood flow and tissue perfusion at all times. Now, let’s look at the importance of microcirculation in wound healing.

What is the Importance of Microcirculation in Wound Healing?

For the sake of this article, we shall review some core aspects of microcirculation related to wound healing, which include the following:

Microcirculation Enhances Fast Healing

As we know, effective blood flow results in healthy living. Microcirculation eases inflammation and calms all kinds of chronic wounds. This core objective can be effectively carried out with the help of D’OXYVA, which guarantees the highest concentration of carbon dioxide and increases consistent blood flow in the body’s microcirculatory system. It is safe, painless, and very simple to use.

Microcirculation Promotes Better Performance

Another salient aspect of microcirculation regarding wound healing is that it encourages healthy living by providing an easy flow of blood throughout the body. It enhances individual health at all ages and fosters general fitness. Microcirculation helps rebuild damaged tissues, thereby facilitating fast healing.

Enhances Renewal and Replacement of Damaged Tissues

The human body requires a recovery phase after a physical injury. The effectiveness of this recovery phase can be guaranteed by a constant flow of blood and a continuous supply of nutrients and oxygen. This is one of the reasons why microcirculation is vital to wound healing; it ensures that the necessary nutrients are readily available for cell renewal. Microcirculation facilitates the continuous flow of blood to the human body by supplying the cells with vital products and removing waste through the microvessels.

Treatment for Chronic Wounds and Other Respiratory diseases

The best way to achieve optimal microcirculation in wound healing is through D’OXYVA. D’OXYVA has become a household name in the health industry due to the health benefits it offers. It is a viable option to eliminate all kinds of chronic pain, wounds and forms of respiratory complications. This product is versatile in nature and guarantees the highest concentration of carbon dioxide, which fosters continuous blood flow. D’OXYVA is affordable, safe, painless, and easy to use. It does not cause any side effects.

Conclusion

Finally, the importance of D’OXYVA to microcirculation in wound healing cannot be underestimated; it is imperative to engage D’OXYVA for any kind of wound to promote fast and easy recovery.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

Clinical studies with D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) have shown* extraordinary results for the role of transdermal non-invasive wound care using ultra-purified, non-toxic FDA-cleared molecules, such as CO2, especially when all other approaches failed.