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Trump Ready To Force Transparency In Healthcare Pricing With An Executive Order

The Trump Administration wants to make it easier for patients and employers to comparison shop for healthcare. On transparency, one can’t fault the Administration for not trying.

So far, the measures implemented have mostly been baby steps. But, this is about to change as President Trump is expected to soon release an executive order on healthcare price transparency. If enacted, this executive order would mandate disclosure of prices throughout the healthcare industry, and be enforceable by federal agencies. It would provide patients and employers pricing data that reflect the negotiated rates between insurers, hospitals, and physicians.

In the lead-up to this week’s expected announcement on the executive order, the Trump Administration has been gradually chipping away to uncover the murky world of healthcare pricing. For example, in October 2018, President Trump signed two bills into law, the Know the Lowest Price Act and the Patients’ Right to Know Drug Prices Act. These bills removed pharmacy gag clauses, imposed by pharmacy benefit managers, which had prevented pharmacists from proactively telling consumers if their prescription would cost less if they paid for it out-of-pocket rather than using their insurance plan.

And, this month, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertisements of prescription drugs on television will soon be required to include price information.

Nonetheless, the pharmacy gag clause bills and requirement to include list price information in DTC advertisements only incrementally address prescription drug price transparency. A much bigger step would be to overhaul the prescription drug rebate system, as proposed by HHS. However, it’s unclear whether and when that will happen.

Ultimately, drug price transparency alone won’t be sufficient to create conditions conducive to a competitive market. It needs to be coupled with dissemination of information on which medications are the most effective for specific conditions or diseases. There have been a number of efforts in the commercial sector to address this issue; MedSavvy, for example, which is a Cambia Health Solutions company. Regence Blue Cross and Blue Shield offers MedSavvy to its customers. The federal government is also supporting initiatives to improve the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s publication of usable information on comparative effectiveness to consumers. But it’s been a very slow process with few tangible results thus far.

The Trump Administration has also focused on disseminating information regarding the quality of physician practices that serve Medicare beneficiaries. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established a website called Physician Compare. However, nearly 80% of physicians aren’t included in the website database. Reporting is voluntary, and so there’s selection bias when it comes to the performance data that do appear. Moreover, the website doesn’t include a comparison of fees for physician services.

Beginning January 1st this year, the federal government is requiring every hospital in the U.S. to post lists of prices of services and technologies online. Such lists are known in the industry as “chargemasters” that comprise of prices of thousands of services and products for which a hospital may bill.

But, CMS acknowledges it is not yet enforcing the hospital pricing rule. Furthermore, implementation of the rules has sparked a debate about whether the price lists are creating more confusion than clarity among patients. Services and products are identified in acronyms, abbreviations, billing codes, and medical terminology that most consumers can’t be expected to understand.

Additionally, the chargemaster lists don’t normally reflect actual transaction charges because hospitals and insurers generally negotiate significantly lower prices. And, hospitals and insurers are resisting public disclosure of negotiated prices. This week’s expected announcement of an executive order may make such resistance a moot point.

Most patients don’t comparison shop for medical care. Some might not be in a position to do so. Others may simply balk. Perhaps this is due in large part to patients not being used to comparison shopping, or to the opaque character of pricing in the healthcare system. As more useful information becomes available, perhaps patients will begin to do more comparison shopping. which in turn will lead to a more competitive market.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only affordable, fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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7 Subtle Signs That Prove You’re Not As Healthy As You Think You Are

When you say healthy, it often brings to mind an image of person that exercises all the time and only eats nutritious food while avoiding junk like candy and fast food. However, it actually demands so much more than that. Truth is, being truly healthy means that one should have a sense of “physical, mental, and social wellbeing, and the resources to live a full life.”

Of course, we don’t always think of it that way. In fact, in most cases, eating heathy and pairing it with consistent exercise is more than enough. However, while being classified as “overweight” or “underweight” is an obvious sign of being unhealthy, there are also other not-so-obvious signs — ones that you may be ignoring. And ones that may mean you’re not as healthy as you believe you are. Below are some of them.

  1. Snoring – You may think it’s just an embarrassing act, but it can also indicate that you’re not that healthy. In fact, snoring is linked to a variety of health conditions, including sleep apnea, heart disease, and even stroke.
  2. Constant skin breakouts – Skin breakouts are also a sign of general unhealthiness, and unfortunately, there’s no single cause. However, thanks to face mapping, we can now easily adjust our lifestyle based on where we get breakouts. Chin acne for example, means we have to eat healthier, while forehead acne means we need better sleep and hygiene.
  3. The white of your eyes aren’t as white – This one is more subtle, but basically, if your eyes are a tad yellowish, it indicates that you may have complications in your bile ducts, gall bladder, liver or pancreas. There’s also red eyes, which come from lack of sleep and exhaustion.
  4. Your nails have an odd color and texture – A yellowish color in your nails is believed to be caused by fluid build-up and inadequate circulation in the body.
  5. Being gassy – Excessive gas can be signs of an irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, and celiac disease.
  6. Constant exhaustion – This one is obvious, but continuous exhaustion means that you may have iron deficiency, too little exercise, and even dehydration.
  7. Your urine doesn’t have a pale color – The color, smell, and density of urine can reveal what’s going on in our body. And in this case, having urine that has a darker color or has a strong scent means that you should probably get yourself checked by a doctor ASAP.

Reference: https://www.medicaldaily.com/7-subtle-signs-prove-youre-not-healthy-you-think-you-are-432551

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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“People are dying”: Diabetics rationing insulin amid rising drug prices

Drug manufacturers were grilled Wednesday about the skyrocketing price of insulin, which has doubled in the last five years and led some patients to ration the life-saving drug. One study finds the underuse of insulin could affect nearly 40 million people with diabetes by 2030.

“Nobody cared or nobody understood that without this next vial of insulin, I wouldn’t live to see another week,” said 28-year-old Kristen Whitney Daniels.

She started rationing her insulin after she was kicked off her parents’ insurance plan two years ago.

“I can’t really explain how isolating and how terrifying it is,” she said.

She’s now a patient at the Yale Diabetes Center, where a recent Journal of American Medical Association study found one in four patients reported “cost-related underuse.” Dr. Kasia Lipska treats patients at the clinic, and was the study’s lead author. She testified on Capitol Hill last week.

  • Woman says her son couldn’t afford his insulin – now he’s dead
  • Eli Lilly rolling out half-price insulin. Diabetics say it’s not enough

“This vial of insulin cost just $21 when it first came on the market in 1996. It now costs $275,” she said.

Some drug makers are already reacting to the outrage. On Wednesday, Sanofi announced it will cut the price of insulin for uninsured patients and those who pay cash to $99 per month. But that doesn’t eliminate advocate concerns.

“People are dying from lack of access to a drug that has been around for almost a century. I think it’s unconscionable,” Lipska said.

Insulin manufacturers told CBS News they’ve taken steps to address prices, including offering free medication to people who quality.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Patients are transforming from passive recipients of healthcare services to active participants in their own health

This is a preview of a research report from Business Insider Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about Business Insider Intelligence, click here. Current subscribers can read the report here.

 

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The consumerization of healthcare — a fundamental shift in patients’ preferences, behaviors, and demands around healthcare services — is threatening hospitals’ bottom lines. For the first time, patients are transforming from passive recipients of healthcare services to active participants in their own health. They’re flocking to online review sites to choose which doctor to see, skipping hospital visits in favor of a health clinic in their local CVS, and aren’t afraid to ditch providers that don’t offer them an engaging experience.

The superior customer service expectations of millennials, declines in hospital profitability, and threats from startup providers and retail pharmacies intensify the need for providers to revamp the patient experience. Providers’ current engagement capabilities are weak, and deficiencies around scheduling, appointment wait times, and billing are dragging on patient satisfaction, driving patients elsewhere and draining provider revenue.

In The Healthcare Consumerization ReportBusiness Insider Intelligence explores the trends that are driving providers to revamp their care services. We then outline how patients’ expectations for transparency, convenience, and access are transforming the way they interact with providers across each stage of care. Finally, we detail strategies health systems and hospitals can implement to create a consumer-centric patient experience that fosters satisfaction, loyalty, and patient volume.

The companies mentioned in this report are: 98point6, BayCare, Cleveland Clinic, CVS, Integris, Kaiser Permanente, Luma Health, New York-Presbyterian, One Medical, Publix, Target, Walgreens, Walmart, Yelp, and Zocdoc.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

 

  • The consumerization of healthcare is redefining how consumers engage with providers across each stage of care.
  • But the vast majority of healthcare providers haven’t sufficiently altered their services to align with current patient expectations. Only 8% of US hospitals and health systems demonstrate strong consumer-centric performance, per a 2018 Kaufman Hall survey.
  • Failure to react to patient preferences hurts provider organizations’ bottom lines. US hospital profit margins are already thinning, and an emerging reimbursement model that ties a portion of providers’ compensation to patient satisfaction means providers can’t afford to preserve the status quo.
  • Alternative players with consumer-focused healthcare services threaten to poach patients from traditional health systems. Tech-focused primary care startups, like One Medical and 98point6, and retail outlets, like Target, Walmart, and CVS, offer patients on-demand access to healthcare providers via mobile apps and convenient locations to receive healthcare services, drawing them away from incumbent health systems.
  • In order to retain patients — and keep them from straying to alternative care services — providers must transform their services with an emphasis on transparency, access, and ongoing engagement outside of the clinic.
  • Healthcare providers that tailor their services to the new healthcare consumer will be well positioned to see growth. Alternatively, businesses that don’t implement these changes could find themselves falling behind the rest of the industry or closing their doors for good.

 

In full, the report:

  • Details how patient behavior, preferences, and expectations have changed.
  • Outlines the demographic and industry trends that should add a sense of urgency for providers to revamp the patient experience.
  • Summarizes how the patient experience providers currently offer isn’t conducive to loyalty and is likely driving patients to nonhospital services.
  • Explains strategies health systems and hospitals can implement to create a consumer-centric patient experience that fosters satisfaction, loyalty, and patient volume.
  • Offers examples of provider organizations that have successfully adopted new strategies to encourage patient-doctor communication, improve satisfaction, and drive scheduling capacity.

 

Reference: https://www.businessinsider.com/the-healthcare-consumerization-report-2018-11?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+businessinsider+%28Business+Insider%29

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Apple Watch 4 can detect D’OXYVA’s benefits.

Did you recently buy yourself a Christmas gift?

Would it happen to be the new Apple Watch Series 4? If so, did you know you can use it to detect D’OXYVA’s benefits?

D’OXYVA is the only fully non-invasive, completely painless, transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits your health, your immune system and your overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

D’OXYVA® plays a vital role in regulating and creating homeostasis (stability) in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) or, more precisely, between its main two functions, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities.

D’OXYVA® has been shown to achieve this by stimulating parasympathetic nerve activities that are responsible for “rest and digest” functions, reducing heart rate, blood pressure, calming, regenerating, healing, and energy reservation.

About Apple Watch 4

One of the biggest upgrades to the Apple Watch Series 4 from its predecessor is its ability to record an electrocardiogram and detect issues with how the user’s heart is functioning. The company’s FDA-approved feature is now live for users in the US.

The device can detect irregularities in your heartbeat, which can point to critical conditions like atrial fibrillation that may result in a stroke. If your Watch classifies your rhythm as a high heart rate or atrial fibrillation, you’ll want to talk to your doctor.

However, it’s worth noting that the Watch only records a basic single-lead ECG, so it can’t detect a stroke, heart attack, or other heart conditions like the 12-lead ECGs taken at a doctor’s office.

If you’re using a Watch Series 4 in the US, here’s how you can take an ECG:

• Ensure your device is updated to watch OS 5.1.2 and paired with an iPhone 5s or later with iOS 12.1.1 on board.

• Set up the ECG app by opening Apple Health on your device and following the on-screen instructions. A prompt should show up automatically, but if you don’t see it, head to Health Data > Heart > Electrocardiogram (ECG).

• Wear your Watch 4 with a snug fit on the wrist you’ve specified in the Apple Watch app (you can find or change this in the Apple Watch app; tap the My Watch tab, then head to General > Watch Orientation).

• Launch the ECG app on your Watch.

• Rest your arms comfortably on a table or in your lap.

• Hold your finger on the Digital Crown without pressing down for 30 seconds. You’ll then see your results and any symptoms that the device detects.
Tap Save to record your symptoms.

• To review your ECG, open the Health app on your iPhone and head to the Health Data tab. Then, tap Heart > Electrocardiogram (ECG), and tap the ECG. You’ll find an option to export a PDF of it, which you can share with your doctor.

 

References:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/apple-wa…
https://www.doxyva.com/kb_results.asp?ID=64

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Did you know when used in a regimen, D`OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits?

doxyva benefits

OPTIMIZE BLOOD CIRCULATION FOR A WIDE VARIETY OF SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) in various clinical trials has validated leading independent research results and demonstrated above-average results in improving a host of physiological functions at the same time.

People using D’OXYVA® have recorded significant improvements in cardiovascular activity leading to much improved physical activity. As part of a healthy lifestyle, D’OXYVA may help significantly reduce the risk of high blood pressure, hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes in just two or three months, with an average use of 5 minutes a day and 5 times a week.

Poor circulation is a gateway for a litany of ailments: slow healing, depression, poor complexion, sores, slow metabolism, and more.

D’OXYVA significantly improves sustained oxygen-rich microcirculatory blood flow locally and throughout the body. Its patented method of fully non-invasive, painless, and harmless transdermal delivery is unique only to D’OXYVA.

When used daily, D’OXYVA users have reported a number of health and beauty benefits, including but not limited to:

  • Relief from symptoms of microvascular complications
  • Significantly increased cardiac function, physical fitness, endurance and strength, muscle size, body tone, faster recovery from sports injuries and surgical trauma
  • Improved self-esteem via promoting healthy and radiant skin, complexion, dry skin relief, and acne reduction
  • Significant reduction in downtime from other skin treatments and cosmetic procedures when used in combination, reduction in the appearance of scars, cellulite, fat, spider veins and stretch marks
  • Promoting and maintaining a healthy weight, improving general mobility, deeper, more restful sleep
  • Significant improvement of mental acuity; concentration, problem solving, multitasking, eye-hand coordination, heightened stamina, energy, and focus while managing stress
  • Improved vitals across the board during checkups with zero adverse event reports after years of regular use by people with various health, demographic, and ethnic backgrounds

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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8 Warning Signs of Poor Blood Circulation

Poor blood circulation is the start of numerous other ailments.

What causes poor blood circulation?

Low blood circulation is caused by different underlying conditions. The most common ones are atherosclerosis (“hardening of the arteries) and peripheral artery disease (PAD).

If you experience symptoms of blood circulation problems, consult your physician right away. Poor circulation can lead to heart attack, stroke and even death.

What are the signs of poor blood circulation?

Symptoms of poor blood circulation mostly occur in the hands, feet, arms, and legs. Here are 8 signs to look out for…

  1. Leg Pain While Walking

A common symptom of poor blood circulation is pain or cramping of your leg or hip muscles. This is felt while walking, climbing stairs or another similar physical activity. This is a condition called intermittent claudication, which is a sign of PAD.

  1. Numbness and Weakness

Your arms or legs may feel weak or numb. This can happen while you are moving, or even sitting still.

If these symptoms in your arms and legs come about suddenly and are accompanied by impaired or slurred speech and drooping facial muscles, you may have low blood circulation to your brain due to atherosclerosis.

Poor circulation in the arteries which supply blood to the brain can cause a stroke.

  1. Coldness and Swelling

If your feet, hands or lower legs feel cold all the time for no apparent reason – it is a sign of poor blood circulation.

Low blood circulation due to PAD or atherosclerosis tends to produce coldness in one foot, hand or leg more than the other. You could also notice swelling in your extremities due to poor circulation, particularly in your legs and feet.

  1. Non-healing Sores

Sores on your feet or legs that don’t seem to heal are a common sign. You may also notice that ulcers or infections in your legs and feet heal very slowly.

You may also notice that you’re losing hair on your legs and feet or that your hair is growing slower than normal. Your toenails may grow slowly as well.

  1. Changes in Skin Colour

Poor circulation can cause your skin in your arms, hands, legs and feet to change colour. You may notice that your skin looks “shiny”.

Your legs and feet may turn pale or bluish in colour, due to the poor blood and oxygen delivery to your extremities.

  1. Weak Pulse in Your Legs

Poor blood circulation due to atherosclerosis or PAD can cause your pulse to become weak in your feet or legs.

When the pulse in your limbs is weak or absent, this means that there is little or no blood circulation to these areas.

The most common method that doctors use to determine blood flow problems is to check your pulse in the leg and groin areas.

  1. Chest Pain

Chest pain or angina, and other symptoms of a heart attack are signs of poor blood circulation in the arteries to your heart.

This may be a sign of atherosclerosis in these arteries. If you have chest pain, you should see your doctor right away to prevent a potentially life-threatening medical problem.

  1. Erectile Dysfunction

If you’re a man, experiencing erectile dysfunction can be a sign of low blood circulation.

Erectile problems can indicate poor blood flow to your groin and lower extremities due to one or more blocked, clogged, or narrowed arteries.

D’OXYVA (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) delivers the highest possible concentration of CO2 and has been clinically studied to SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASE BLOOD FLOW volume in the microcirculatory system.

In short, based on current leading neurology, immunology, microvascular, and cellular oxygenation science, D’OXYVA is leading the field by quickly targeting to:

Significantly lower the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular complications

Provide complete healing of difficult wounds together with major pain relief and improved quality of life:

  • Detoxify the skin and body
  • Improve sleep
  • Stamina and skin health
  • Reduce inflammation
  • And much more for all kinds of people
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CARBON DIOXIDE AND HUMAN HEALTH

Pollutants are dangerous compounds for living beings.

Like water, CO2 is vital for life on Earth; thus, CO2 is not a pollutant or contaminant.

The specific heat of CO2 is 850 J/Kg K, which means carbon dioxide is able to absorb, store and emit heat. However, we cannot take this property into account when considering if CO2 is a pollutant because Water has a specific heat of 1,996 J/kg K, which means it is more efficient than CO2 at absorbing, emitting and storing heat. Water, like CO2, is vital for living beings.

CO2 densities have increased to more than 4000 ppmv in some geological eras, for example, during the Ordovician Period (Scotesse; 2002. Avildsen et al1998). When CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere has reached densities this high in the past, life flourished abundantly. Consequently, we cannot consider such a high concentration of atmospheric CO2 as “pollution”.

CO2 is the basic nutrient for plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Plants form the base of every food chain. Thus, the greater the density of CO2 in a given environment, the greater will be the production of food for plants and of the animals that feed on them.

In recent times it has become fashionable to relate CO2 to global warming, but water in its liquid or gaseous phase absorbs, stores and emits heat 4 times (400%) more efficiently than CO2. If, therefore, by this property water is not considered a pollutant, CO2 then cannot be considered a pollutant either.

Carbon Dioxide cannot intoxicate because it is a non-poisonous non-toxic substance. The data for CO2 related to human health are next:

  • The density of CO2 in the atmosphere is 0.000747 Kg per cubic meter of air.

Normal CO2 Levels. The effects of an increased level of CO2 on an adult person in good health can be summarized as:

  • Normal outside levels: 350 – 600 ppmv.
  • Acceptable levels: up to 600 ppmv.
  • Stiffness and odors: 600 – 1000 ppmv.

Data provided by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA):

  • Standards: 1000 ppmv.
  • Stupor: 1000 – 2500 ppm.
  • Maximum allowed concentration in an 8 hour working period: 5,000 ppmv.

Extreme and Dangerous CO2 Levels:

  • Nausea and increase of the cardiac and respiratory frequencies (from oxygen deficiency): 30,000 ppmv.
  • The above plus headaches and sight impairment: 50,000 ppmv.
  • Unconsciousness and death: 100,000 ppmv (OSHA).

As you can see, Carbon Dioxide does not intoxicate — it suffocates. All of the effects listed above correspond to asphyxia, not to poisoning; however, water and sand also asphyxiate and they are not considered pollutants either. Consequently, CO2 cannot be considered a pollutant merely because it asphyxiates.

Many have tried to tag CO2 as a pollutant simply because it is a product of fossil fuel combustion. However, CO2 is also a product of respiration, fermentation and putrefaction. In any case, the CO2 released by combustion of fossil fuels had previously been taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic organisms and converted into organic compounds to be used in their metabolic functions as structures for reproduction, etc. When those photosynthetic organisms later died, their remains were subjected to strong geological processes that convert organic matter into oil, coal and methane. (Reccommended reading: The Holocene CO2 Rise: Anthropogenic or Natural?)

Those products are the fossil fuels that we use today to power our industries and vehicles; therefore, we are only returning CO2 to the place it once occupied during the Carboniferous Period. CO2 cannot then be considered a pollutant just because it is released back into the atmosphere by combustion of organic fuels and from many other natural processes unrelated with life.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Are You Ready to Visit Your Doctor Online?

Dallas marketing executive Susan Thompson knew exactly where her cold was headed when she began feeling under the weather one day a few years ago. Her symptoms follow a pattern, often leading to a chest infection that requires antibiotics to clear up. “After living in this body for 74 years, I know what I’m getting,” Thompson says.

Instead of waiting a few days to get an appointment with her doctor to confirm her diagnosis, Thompson called Teladoc, a telemedicine service offered by her employer. Within 10 minutes she had a doctor on the line, and by the end of the day she had a prescription for the infection.

She’s used the service three times since, always with the same results.

Thompson is part of a growing trend toward telemedicine, which uses technology to connect doctors and patients via apps, phones and videoconferencing. Telemedicine revenue is expected to grow around 40 percent a year over the next five years, from its current $645 million to more than $3.5 billion in 2020, according to a report by IBISWorld.

Telemedicine has been rapidly changing the way health care is delivered in the United States, giving doctors the ability to communicate with their patients through text and video messages from thousands of miles away in the event that an in-person consultation is either unnecessary or unattainable.

“At this point it feels like health care is lagging daily life, with the advent of smartphones and the Internet,” says Shana Alex Charles, an assistant professor in the Health Services Department at California State University, Fullerton. “Why do we still need to go to a doctor’s office and sit in a waiting room for something that can be done, especially something like daily monitoring, better and faster online?”

When it comes to serving consumers, the industry is growing in two distinct areas: non-urgent diagnosis and treatment of minor ailments like strep throat or an ear infection, and ongoing monitoring of high-risk patients or those recently released from the hospital.

In the first instance, a person experiencing flu-like symptoms would log on to an app or Web portal directly administered by a health system, an insurer or their employer and video conference with a doctor who would assess the patient and write a prescription, all from potentially hundreds of miles away. Some pharmacies have installed self-service kiosks that patients can use to video conference with a doctor who could potentially call in a prescription while the consumer is still in the store.

In the second scenario, a patient might go home with Internet-connected devices that would monitor their blood pressure, temperature and other vitals and remotely send reports to a doctor or hospital who would analyze the results for any potential problems.

“There’s been a push to lower hospital readmission rates along with health care reform,” says Sarah Turk, a health care sector analyst with IBISWorld. “You can use telehealth to examine and monitor fluctuations in their system and then address it before it becomes a costly complication.”

 

The Savings

Telemedicine gives the patient the convenience of staying home (and not spreading or catching germs in a doctor’s office) for a fraction of the price of a traditional appointment or a visit to an ER or urgent care clinic. The cost of a telemedicine call is usually around $25 to $30.

Whether insurance will cover the service, however, varies. Twenty-nine states require insurance companies to reimburse telehealth treatment, but in other states it’s up to your insurer. Another 15 states are considering similar laws. Either way, you can pay for services using a health savings account or flexible savings account.

Insurers and some medical service providers have been at the forefront of the trend toward telemedicine and now employers are starting to take notice, particularly as they realize that they need to drastically reduce costs before the Obamacare “Cadillac tax” kicks in in 2018. They’re increasingly working with insurers to implement telemedicine programs as part of their benefit package. Some insurers are throwing the service in for free to large companies as a way to keep their business.

 

Companies Get on Board

Employers offering telemedicine increased by a third in 2015, according to Towers Watson, and more than 80 percent of employers are considering implementing programs by 2018. Even so, use by employees is still relatively small. Just one in 10 eligible members accessed such services last year. Increased adoption could save the health care industry more than $6 billion a year, the benefits consultant found, by reducing office and ER visits by 15 percent and urgent care visits by 37 percent.

The hesitation on the part of patients may have to do with age and general comfort with technology. A recent report by TechnologyAdvice Research found that less than half of those over age 65 would trust a virtual diagnosis, compared to 83 percent of 18-to-24 year olds.

While many in the medical field support the trend toward telemedicine and its inevitable expansion, many have also expressed concerns that patients who need in-patient care might elect for telemedicine in an effort to save money, or that doctors administering care might miss a diagnosis because they’re missing some key information in the patient’s medical history or because the patient read her vitals incorrectly.

“We think that these services should allow you to extend your existing relationship with your doctor, not to replace them with a doc of the day,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist and associate dean for the Center for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic.

An adoption of telemedicine by existing health care providers could help alleviate some concerns. The TechnologyAdvice report found that about 63 percent of consumers would be more likely to schedule a virtual appointment if they had previously seen the doctor in person.

 

An Answer to the Doctor Shortage


In addition to helping consumers access medical care in a more convenient and cost-efficient manner, telemedicine technology is also helping to address a doctor shortage, particularly in rural areas. The Association of American Medical Colleges projects that the country could be short more than 50,000 doctors by 2025, including primary care physicians, surgeons and specialists. The shortage will be felt even more acutely as an aging population increases the demand for health services.

Patients in places affected by the shortage can use telehealth to see doctors if local physicians are spread too thin, and some hospitals are using Skype for specialists to see patients who need a second opinion.

 

 

Reference: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/2015/10/21/Are-You-Ready-Visit-Your-Doctor-Online-Telemedicine-Has-Arrived

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Did you know that it is impossible to have a good health without a good blood?

Did you know that it is impossible to have a good health without a good blood?

It is impossible to have good health without a good blood and it is a good distribution of all organs, systems and cells of the body. The blood carries silicon to the nails, hair, skin and other places “far away” where it is required, and transport to the bone calcium, vitamins, minerals and oxygen to various body parts as well as many important functions within it.

The heart is the force responsible for pumping blood so that it can spread its reach and nutrients. It collects waste materials from different parts of the body too. The blood travels through the body at a speed of 9 mm per second, and during the journey it cleans, nourishes, sterilizes, distributes chemical compounds from food, toxins and helps to purify cells.

Arteries and veins

The veins and arteries are the roads where the blood cells travel inside. The veins carry blood loaded with debris and clean blood in arteries. If any of these avenues is blocked for any reason, you can up of high blood pressure, a result that warns that heart is “pushing” with more force and pressure so that blood can flow through the capillaries and as fast as it should.

If blood cannot flow at a certain speed, then begin to generate a series of severe adverse consequences for the body indicating that there is venous congestion, such as leg pain, swelling, cramps, anemia, or in severe cases, increases the propensity for an attack of paralysis. If the blood does not run optimally, but we eat very well, we can begin to have health problems, this is also noticeable in the appearance of hair and skin, reflecting weakness and opacity due to poor oxygenation and distribution of nutrients to the body.

Knowing the importance of a good circulation, it is necessary to keep not only a diet of good quality but very healthy habits so that your blood and all its components can be shared with vigor and stimulate action in cleansing the blood.

Natural remedies for improve your circulation

Here are some tips for you to improve your circulation:

Look after your heart

There are many ways to keep your heart healthy and strong throughout life, no matter how old you are, you can make your heart pump strongly and full of life. For this, it is advisable to walk and do exercises such as swimming or climbing. The heights are great for the heart, a greater height, greater uptake of oxygen, but you should be aware of your fitness to climb a mountain, it might not react favorably if you’re not used to extreme heights, and you could feel dizzy, with headaches or even vomiting. This only means that your body is not accustomed to it.

Diet

To strengthen the heart’s nothing better than chlorophyll liquid foods containing vitamin E, like avocado and olive oil, and pollen and yeast.

Veins clean

Besides a good routine of exercise, it is necessary to avoid in your diet, saturated fats, fried things, animals sausages, meats, milk cows, and so on. This type of fat congests veins, reducing the space through which circulates the blood and causing the heart to put more pressure on the pump. For fragile veins, it is best to eat buckwheat and consumption of foods containingvitamin Csuch as orange, lemon, and so on. Consuming vitamin E is recommended for the muscles, and veins also contain muscle. Oats, raw garlic, celery, avocado and vegetable broths are excellent.

Breathing

There are many types of breathing that promote good circulation. The rapid inhalations and slow exhalations are recommended. There are practices such as yoga and meditation activities that promote different types of breathing very effective movement.

Enthusiasm

Believe it or not, having a good mood and being happy with what you do in your life, not only promotes good movement but a movement for quality, full of strength. It is as if some form of heart be given the message “I like to live” and this is justified with such energy. Therefore, it encourages thinking of yearning and attempts to follow it, no matter how young or old you feel, when your mind is full of energy and enthusiasm, your life will be too.

Baths and massages

And finally, bathrooms and massages are very suitable for putting the blood in a very good way. Hot water brings blood to the surface and the cold cut. This remedy is ideal for those people that for any reason are unable to perform physical activity.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.