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Patients are transforming from passive recipients of healthcare services to active participants in their own health

This is a preview of a research report from Business Insider Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service. To learn more about Business Insider Intelligence, click here. Current subscribers can read the report here.

 

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The consumerization of healthcare — a fundamental shift in patients’ preferences, behaviors, and demands around healthcare services — is threatening hospitals’ bottom lines. For the first time, patients are transforming from passive recipients of healthcare services to active participants in their own health. They’re flocking to online review sites to choose which doctor to see, skipping hospital visits in favor of a health clinic in their local CVS, and aren’t afraid to ditch providers that don’t offer them an engaging experience.

The superior customer service expectations of millennials, declines in hospital profitability, and threats from startup providers and retail pharmacies intensify the need for providers to revamp the patient experience. Providers’ current engagement capabilities are weak, and deficiencies around scheduling, appointment wait times, and billing are dragging on patient satisfaction, driving patients elsewhere and draining provider revenue.

In The Healthcare Consumerization ReportBusiness Insider Intelligence explores the trends that are driving providers to revamp their care services. We then outline how patients’ expectations for transparency, convenience, and access are transforming the way they interact with providers across each stage of care. Finally, we detail strategies health systems and hospitals can implement to create a consumer-centric patient experience that fosters satisfaction, loyalty, and patient volume.

The companies mentioned in this report are: 98point6, BayCare, Cleveland Clinic, CVS, Integris, Kaiser Permanente, Luma Health, New York-Presbyterian, One Medical, Publix, Target, Walgreens, Walmart, Yelp, and Zocdoc.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

 

  • The consumerization of healthcare is redefining how consumers engage with providers across each stage of care.
  • But the vast majority of healthcare providers haven’t sufficiently altered their services to align with current patient expectations. Only 8% of US hospitals and health systems demonstrate strong consumer-centric performance, per a 2018 Kaufman Hall survey.
  • Failure to react to patient preferences hurts provider organizations’ bottom lines. US hospital profit margins are already thinning, and an emerging reimbursement model that ties a portion of providers’ compensation to patient satisfaction means providers can’t afford to preserve the status quo.
  • Alternative players with consumer-focused healthcare services threaten to poach patients from traditional health systems. Tech-focused primary care startups, like One Medical and 98point6, and retail outlets, like Target, Walmart, and CVS, offer patients on-demand access to healthcare providers via mobile apps and convenient locations to receive healthcare services, drawing them away from incumbent health systems.
  • In order to retain patients — and keep them from straying to alternative care services — providers must transform their services with an emphasis on transparency, access, and ongoing engagement outside of the clinic.
  • Healthcare providers that tailor their services to the new healthcare consumer will be well positioned to see growth. Alternatively, businesses that don’t implement these changes could find themselves falling behind the rest of the industry or closing their doors for good.

 

In full, the report:

  • Details how patient behavior, preferences, and expectations have changed.
  • Outlines the demographic and industry trends that should add a sense of urgency for providers to revamp the patient experience.
  • Summarizes how the patient experience providers currently offer isn’t conducive to loyalty and is likely driving patients to nonhospital services.
  • Explains strategies health systems and hospitals can implement to create a consumer-centric patient experience that fosters satisfaction, loyalty, and patient volume.
  • Offers examples of provider organizations that have successfully adopted new strategies to encourage patient-doctor communication, improve satisfaction, and drive scheduling capacity.

 

Reference: https://www.businessinsider.com/the-healthcare-consumerization-report-2018-11?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+businessinsider+%28Business+Insider%29

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Apple Watch 4 can detect D’OXYVA’s benefits.

Did you recently buy yourself a Christmas gift?

Would it happen to be the new Apple Watch Series 4? If so, did you know you can use it to detect D’OXYVA’s benefits?

D’OXYVA is the only fully non-invasive, completely painless, transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits your health, your immune system and your overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

D’OXYVA® plays a vital role in regulating and creating homeostasis (stability) in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) or, more precisely, between its main two functions, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities.

D’OXYVA® has been shown to achieve this by stimulating parasympathetic nerve activities that are responsible for “rest and digest” functions, reducing heart rate, blood pressure, calming, regenerating, healing, and energy reservation.

About Apple Watch 4

One of the biggest upgrades to the Apple Watch Series 4 from its predecessor is its ability to record an electrocardiogram and detect issues with how the user’s heart is functioning. The company’s FDA-approved feature is now live for users in the US.

The device can detect irregularities in your heartbeat, which can point to critical conditions like atrial fibrillation that may result in a stroke. If your Watch classifies your rhythm as a high heart rate or atrial fibrillation, you’ll want to talk to your doctor.

However, it’s worth noting that the Watch only records a basic single-lead ECG, so it can’t detect a stroke, heart attack, or other heart conditions like the 12-lead ECGs taken at a doctor’s office.

If you’re using a Watch Series 4 in the US, here’s how you can take an ECG:

• Ensure your device is updated to watch OS 5.1.2 and paired with an iPhone 5s or later with iOS 12.1.1 on board.

• Set up the ECG app by opening Apple Health on your device and following the on-screen instructions. A prompt should show up automatically, but if you don’t see it, head to Health Data > Heart > Electrocardiogram (ECG).

• Wear your Watch 4 with a snug fit on the wrist you’ve specified in the Apple Watch app (you can find or change this in the Apple Watch app; tap the My Watch tab, then head to General > Watch Orientation).

• Launch the ECG app on your Watch.

• Rest your arms comfortably on a table or in your lap.

• Hold your finger on the Digital Crown without pressing down for 30 seconds. You’ll then see your results and any symptoms that the device detects.
Tap Save to record your symptoms.

• To review your ECG, open the Health app on your iPhone and head to the Health Data tab. Then, tap Heart > Electrocardiogram (ECG), and tap the ECG. You’ll find an option to export a PDF of it, which you can share with your doctor.

 

References:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/apple-wa…
https://www.doxyva.com/kb_results.asp?ID=64

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Circularity Healthcare Named “Company of the Year” – Top 10 Diabetes Care Solution Providers 2018

BREAKING NEW GROUNDS IN Diabetes Care

According to the American Diabetes Association, millions of people around the world live with diabetes or know someone living with diabetes. No type of diabetes is curable yet; however, it is a very treatable disease, and no matter how frightening, annoying, and frustrating it can be, people with diabetes can live long, healthy, and happy lives. Our goal is to provide you the information, tools, and resources to help make that happen. In a recent statistics report from CDC National Diabetes Statistics, diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.

With numerous methods on the market for managing and treating diabetes, there is one product that is a cut above the others when it comes to diabetes care–D’OXYVA by Circularity Healthcare. Setting a new paradigm in health science, D’OXYVA is a truly unique technology at its core, a first-of-its-kind biotech solution clinically validated to significantly lower the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

Circularity Healthcare was recently selected for the list of “Top 10 Diabetes Care Solution Providers of 2018” in the upcoming November Diabetes Care special edition of MedTech Outlook magazine after receiving more than 270 unique nominations from more than 39,000 qualified print and 66,000 qualified digital subscribers. The magazine does not rank the top ten providers; it lists them in alphabetical order on a full page. In addition, the magazine will run a featured article on Circularity and its D’OXYVA product line in the same special edition this November.

The future holds favorable prospects for Circularity Healthcare. They are expecting continued commercial growth with D’OXYVA, with other major announcements to follow shortly in multiple leading media outlets in the US and around the world as Circularity’s global marketing and PR campaign based on years of yet-unpublished highly successful clinical evidence unfolds in the coming weeks and months.

At the end of it all, D’OXYVA is indeed a revolutionary and a much-needed step toward a powerful and safe diabetes care solution that is adding immeasurable value to health outcomes.

 

December 2018 digital issue of MedTech Outlook: https://www.medicaltechoutlook.com/magazines/December2018/Diabetes_Care/#page=27

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8 Warning Signs of Poor Blood Circulation

Poor blood circulation is the start of numerous other ailments.

What causes poor blood circulation?

Low blood circulation is caused by different underlying conditions. The most common ones are atherosclerosis (“hardening of the arteries) and peripheral artery disease (PAD).

If you experience symptoms of blood circulation problems, consult your physician right away. Poor circulation can lead to heart attack, stroke and even death.

What are the signs of poor blood circulation?

Symptoms of poor blood circulation mostly occur in the hands, feet, arms, and legs. Here are 8 signs to look out for…

  1. Leg Pain While Walking

A common symptom of poor blood circulation is pain or cramping of your leg or hip muscles. This is felt while walking, climbing stairs or another similar physical activity. This is a condition called intermittent claudication, which is a sign of PAD.

  1. Numbness and Weakness

Your arms or legs may feel weak or numb. This can happen while you are moving, or even sitting still.

If these symptoms in your arms and legs come about suddenly and are accompanied by impaired or slurred speech and drooping facial muscles, you may have low blood circulation to your brain due to atherosclerosis.

Poor circulation in the arteries which supply blood to the brain can cause a stroke.

  1. Coldness and Swelling

If your feet, hands or lower legs feel cold all the time for no apparent reason – it is a sign of poor blood circulation.

Low blood circulation due to PAD or atherosclerosis tends to produce coldness in one foot, hand or leg more than the other. You could also notice swelling in your extremities due to poor circulation, particularly in your legs and feet.

  1. Non-healing Sores

Sores on your feet or legs that don’t seem to heal are a common sign. You may also notice that ulcers or infections in your legs and feet heal very slowly.

You may also notice that you’re losing hair on your legs and feet or that your hair is growing slower than normal. Your toenails may grow slowly as well.

  1. Changes in Skin Colour

Poor circulation can cause your skin in your arms, hands, legs and feet to change colour. You may notice that your skin looks “shiny”.

Your legs and feet may turn pale or bluish in colour, due to the poor blood and oxygen delivery to your extremities.

  1. Weak Pulse in Your Legs

Poor blood circulation due to atherosclerosis or PAD can cause your pulse to become weak in your feet or legs.

When the pulse in your limbs is weak or absent, this means that there is little or no blood circulation to these areas.

The most common method that doctors use to determine blood flow problems is to check your pulse in the leg and groin areas.

  1. Chest Pain

Chest pain or angina, and other symptoms of a heart attack are signs of poor blood circulation in the arteries to your heart.

This may be a sign of atherosclerosis in these arteries. If you have chest pain, you should see your doctor right away to prevent a potentially life-threatening medical problem.

  1. Erectile Dysfunction

If you’re a man, experiencing erectile dysfunction can be a sign of low blood circulation.

Erectile problems can indicate poor blood flow to your groin and lower extremities due to one or more blocked, clogged, or narrowed arteries.

D’OXYVA (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) delivers the highest possible concentration of CO2 and has been clinically studied to SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASE BLOOD FLOW volume in the microcirculatory system.

In short, based on current leading neurology, immunology, microvascular, and cellular oxygenation science, D’OXYVA is leading the field by quickly targeting to:

Significantly lower the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular complications

Provide complete healing of difficult wounds together with major pain relief and improved quality of life:

  • Detoxify the skin and body
  • Improve sleep
  • Stamina and skin health
  • Reduce inflammation
  • And much more for all kinds of people
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Are You Ready to Visit Your Doctor Online?

Dallas marketing executive Susan Thompson knew exactly where her cold was headed when she began feeling under the weather one day a few years ago. Her symptoms follow a pattern, often leading to a chest infection that requires antibiotics to clear up. “After living in this body for 74 years, I know what I’m getting,” Thompson says.

Instead of waiting a few days to get an appointment with her doctor to confirm her diagnosis, Thompson called Teladoc, a telemedicine service offered by her employer. Within 10 minutes she had a doctor on the line, and by the end of the day she had a prescription for the infection.

She’s used the service three times since, always with the same results.

Thompson is part of a growing trend toward telemedicine, which uses technology to connect doctors and patients via apps, phones and videoconferencing. Telemedicine revenue is expected to grow around 40 percent a year over the next five years, from its current $645 million to more than $3.5 billion in 2020, according to a report by IBISWorld.

Telemedicine has been rapidly changing the way health care is delivered in the United States, giving doctors the ability to communicate with their patients through text and video messages from thousands of miles away in the event that an in-person consultation is either unnecessary or unattainable.

“At this point it feels like health care is lagging daily life, with the advent of smartphones and the Internet,” says Shana Alex Charles, an assistant professor in the Health Services Department at California State University, Fullerton. “Why do we still need to go to a doctor’s office and sit in a waiting room for something that can be done, especially something like daily monitoring, better and faster online?”

When it comes to serving consumers, the industry is growing in two distinct areas: non-urgent diagnosis and treatment of minor ailments like strep throat or an ear infection, and ongoing monitoring of high-risk patients or those recently released from the hospital.

In the first instance, a person experiencing flu-like symptoms would log on to an app or Web portal directly administered by a health system, an insurer or their employer and video conference with a doctor who would assess the patient and write a prescription, all from potentially hundreds of miles away. Some pharmacies have installed self-service kiosks that patients can use to video conference with a doctor who could potentially call in a prescription while the consumer is still in the store.

In the second scenario, a patient might go home with Internet-connected devices that would monitor their blood pressure, temperature and other vitals and remotely send reports to a doctor or hospital who would analyze the results for any potential problems.

“There’s been a push to lower hospital readmission rates along with health care reform,” says Sarah Turk, a health care sector analyst with IBISWorld. “You can use telehealth to examine and monitor fluctuations in their system and then address it before it becomes a costly complication.”

 

The Savings

Telemedicine gives the patient the convenience of staying home (and not spreading or catching germs in a doctor’s office) for a fraction of the price of a traditional appointment or a visit to an ER or urgent care clinic. The cost of a telemedicine call is usually around $25 to $30.

Whether insurance will cover the service, however, varies. Twenty-nine states require insurance companies to reimburse telehealth treatment, but in other states it’s up to your insurer. Another 15 states are considering similar laws. Either way, you can pay for services using a health savings account or flexible savings account.

Insurers and some medical service providers have been at the forefront of the trend toward telemedicine and now employers are starting to take notice, particularly as they realize that they need to drastically reduce costs before the Obamacare “Cadillac tax” kicks in in 2018. They’re increasingly working with insurers to implement telemedicine programs as part of their benefit package. Some insurers are throwing the service in for free to large companies as a way to keep their business.

 

Companies Get on Board

Employers offering telemedicine increased by a third in 2015, according to Towers Watson, and more than 80 percent of employers are considering implementing programs by 2018. Even so, use by employees is still relatively small. Just one in 10 eligible members accessed such services last year. Increased adoption could save the health care industry more than $6 billion a year, the benefits consultant found, by reducing office and ER visits by 15 percent and urgent care visits by 37 percent.

The hesitation on the part of patients may have to do with age and general comfort with technology. A recent report by TechnologyAdvice Research found that less than half of those over age 65 would trust a virtual diagnosis, compared to 83 percent of 18-to-24 year olds.

While many in the medical field support the trend toward telemedicine and its inevitable expansion, many have also expressed concerns that patients who need in-patient care might elect for telemedicine in an effort to save money, or that doctors administering care might miss a diagnosis because they’re missing some key information in the patient’s medical history or because the patient read her vitals incorrectly.

“We think that these services should allow you to extend your existing relationship with your doctor, not to replace them with a doc of the day,” says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist and associate dean for the Center for Connected Care at Mayo Clinic.

An adoption of telemedicine by existing health care providers could help alleviate some concerns. The TechnologyAdvice report found that about 63 percent of consumers would be more likely to schedule a virtual appointment if they had previously seen the doctor in person.

 

An Answer to the Doctor Shortage


In addition to helping consumers access medical care in a more convenient and cost-efficient manner, telemedicine technology is also helping to address a doctor shortage, particularly in rural areas. The Association of American Medical Colleges projects that the country could be short more than 50,000 doctors by 2025, including primary care physicians, surgeons and specialists. The shortage will be felt even more acutely as an aging population increases the demand for health services.

Patients in places affected by the shortage can use telehealth to see doctors if local physicians are spread too thin, and some hospitals are using Skype for specialists to see patients who need a second opinion.

 

 

Reference: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/2015/10/21/Are-You-Ready-Visit-Your-Doctor-Online-Telemedicine-Has-Arrived

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Breaking News from the PWCS Regional Conference

Following Successful Wound Healing Pilot Study, Circularity Launches Multicenter Clinical Trials, Business Initiatives with Influential Experts Across the Region

The Philippine Wound Care Society is a non profit, non stock, SEC registered organization. It was founded on September 09, 2009 with the purpose of improving the wound management in the Philippines through education. The society which is composed of physicians from different specialty groups and allied services (wound care nurse, physical therapy) brings together professionals involved in wound care.
 
The organization held its 1st regional meeting last February 26-27, 2015 at Cebu City Philippines. InvisiDerm’s CEO, Norbert Kiss and Senior Sales and Marketing Manager, Jennifer Rose Boadilla were invited by the President of the organization, Dr. Martin Anthony A. Villa and got the chance to meet some of the most influential cardiovascular and wound care KOLs at the said event.
 
The event was professional and had overwhelming participation exceeding the initially registered numbers. The speakers and their presentations were high quality and informative showcasing the latest in technologies and approaches to wound management.
 
We are glad to announce that InvisiDerm has secured some of the most influential cardiovascular and wound care KOLs from Taiwan, Singapore, Japan, Korea, Philippines and a few other countries via strategic relationships at this Philippine Wound Care Society Regional Meeting. In addition, a protocol for a comprehensive multicenter study coupled with diagnostics for diabetic foot wound healing on hundreds of subjects at leading hospitals, and an academic level study into the biochemical properties of D’OXYVA in wound healing, and a study for erectile dysfunction in diabetics was finalized, agreed and initiated with several KOLs based on the successful pilot study conducted by Dr. Harikrishna R. Nair at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The quality of life benefits for patients such as significantly improved sleeping, eating, mood and pain makes D’OXYVA a distinct winner besides being noninvasive and fast without negative side effects. Furthermore, InvisiDerm has met regional directors of several leading wound care products multinationals and their distributors for in-depth private discussions about business models and development challenges across Asia. Circularity is clearly a leader in a number of aspects if not most. Special thanks to the team at Getz Bros. Philippines for their warm hospitality.