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To Protect Your Brain, Take Care of Your Heart

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Managing high blood pressure, exercising regularly and adopting other habits that improve cardiovascular health all have serious benefits for your brain, too. A new report from the AARP-founded Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) — a working group of scientists, health care professionals and policy experts — confirms that heart health and brain health share a direct link. And taking steps to manage cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels, no matter how late in life, improves your chances of staying sharp as you age.

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“The brain is one of the most vascular organs in the body — it has an even longer highway of blood vessels than the heart. And so it makes perfect sense that part of brain health is vascular health,” says gerontologist Jeff D. Williamson, a professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine and GCBH contributor.

The report examines the latest evidence on the heart and brain connection and includes a list of recommendations individuals can act on to improve cardiovascular and cognitive outcomes. Among the report’s top tips is to check your blood pressure regularly and work with a health professional to bring it down if it’s high. The latest advice is to aim for a blood pressure of 120/80 mm Hg or lower. A groundbreaking study found that adults who maintained readings in that range were less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment, a serious loss of memory and thinking skills that is often the earliest phase of Alzheimer’s and dementia, compared to those with higher numbers.

“We’re not saying you should be in a panic if your blood pressure isn’t 120,” says GCBH Executive Director Sarah Lenz Lock. But patients and physicians should be “aggressively” paying attention to blood pressure in a new way “because it’s clear it affects your heart, but it’s also really clear that it affects your brain,” she adds.

High blood pressure is “the most common risk factor that comes through primary care,” Williamson says. “And so patients and their health care providers need to do a better job of making sure that they understand how to correctly measure blood pressure, and then that they seriously” control it.

Lock recommends keeping a blood pressure monitor at home and taking regular, accurate readings. If your numbers are high or you notice them trending that way, contact your health care provider. Lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure, and when those don’t work, medications can help.

Getting regular exercise, managing high cholesterol and eating a healthy diet are also recommended for better heart and brain health. Experts also warn against smoking and advise adults to keep blood sugar levels within a healthy range.

“These are simple things that are somehow not very simple for people to do. And so we need to take steps to help people make the positive lifestyle changes they need,” Lock says. However difficult healthy habits can be to adopt, geriatric psychiatrist Kristine Yaffe calls the results of the report “very empowering,” especially when scientists are grappling to better understand the underlying causes of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia and to find a cure.

“We have something in our back pocket we can do something about,” says Yaffe, a professor of psychiatry, neurology and epidemiology at the University of California, San Francisco, who also collaborated on the report. “Increasingly, what we understand is that cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors are probably our best strategy to reduce dementia at this point.”

Williamson adds, “We want to find a cure. But the most progress in health and well-being over the past centuries has been in prevention. And this is a prevention strategy.”

Recommendations from the GCBH Brain-Heart Connection report:​

  1. Lead a physically active life.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight with good nutrition and exercise.
  3. Don’t start smoking, and if you do smoke, quit.
  4. Check your blood pressure regularly. If it’s too high, work with a health professional to lower it safely.
  5. Have your cholesterol and lipid profile checked regularly. If it’s too high, take steps to reduce it.
  6. Keep blood sugar within a healthy range, as defined by your health care provider.
  7. If you have diabetes or prediabetes, consult with a health care provider and nutritionist in order to help you manage these conditions.
  8. Even after starting medication or lifestyle change, continue to regularly monitor blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and weight.
  9. People with symptoms of sleep apnea should be tested and treated if diagnosed.
  10. Take the time and steps to manage your stress effectively.

Reference(s)

https://www.aarp.org/health/brain-health/info-2020/heart-health-brain-health.html?cmp=SL-DSO-TABOOLA-MOB-HEALTH-BRAIN&tblci=GiA4SjQZVsbgk9psRyzNvdXpc5vPsrXXlsgM7XKmsfS3fyCVmz0#tblciGiA4SjQZVsbgk9psRyzNvdXpc5vPsrXXlsgM7XKmsfS3fyCVmz0

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Experts say D’OXYVA® can help patients find relief. Overwhelming published medical data shows people with preexisting conditions, including diabetes may experience serious complications with COVID-19. D’OXYVA significantly helps people and their pets by gently and quickly spraying a patented and patent-pending ultra-purified, supersaturated solution on the skin surface to achieve major health benefits for well over 90% of users. Experts call D’OXYVA a game-changer biotech.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive wound care,” Dr. Michael McGlamry. Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

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Microcirculation: Exploring and understanding the unknown

cancer

Everything is in the microcirculation. According to Dr. Ricardo Quintos II, most medical problems, particularly serious ones like stroke, kidney failure or heart attack, can trace its roots to circulation.

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Medical practitioners need to focus on, and have a better understanding of, the blood flow through the smallest vessels in the circulatory system, or microcirculation, he said. Just like vascular surgery, of which Dr Quintos is a pioneer of in the Philippines, he is now setting his sights on looking at the unseen.

“One of the reasons that made me go into vascular is the realization that all these organs are served by the vascular tree,” Quintos told MIMS in an interview.

The vascular tree is made up of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules and veins. All together, these constitute the complex system that is at the heart of circulation – capillary exchange.

To illustrate the importance of microcirculation, Quintos used cancer as an example.

One reason there is cancer is because of a disordered growth in the vascular tree supplying cancer cells with too much blood and nutrients, he explained.

Using chemotherapy agents is not the answer to treat the cancer because not only will it kill the cancerous cells, but also the normal ones. The better treatment course is to address the vascular problem. – Dr. Ricardo Quintos

“What you do is just starve the cancer cells. You give antiandrogenic substances so that vascular tree will just shrink. And once that happens, they will have no more blood and will just die.”

A second example is how to treat vascular problems when a patient has a heart attack. Instead of doing a bypass to allow more blood to go to the heart, Quintos recommended making the heart “grow its own arteries.” More specifically, to give androgenic factors to make the arteries grow its own bypasses, which is not only less risky but also more natural.

“And that is what we mean by looking into the microcirculation,” Quintos stressed.

The vascular surgeon said they have put up their own microcirculatory laboratory and undertaken research on microcirculation.

“All of these vascular procedures will not work if your microcirculation is not working,” he explained.

He said a heart attack is not the result of blockage in the arteries of the heart, but rather the microcirculation of the heart is not working very well, because the cells there are poor. The brain, Quintos pointed out, stops working not due to poor circulation but because microcirculation to the brain breaks down.

Having made great inroads in the field of vascular surgery, Quintos now sees microcirculation as the future in medical treatment.

“We have to look into what we cannot see before. And the thing we cannot see in the vascular world is microcirculation,” he said, adding, “Ultimately, it’s all for the patient.”

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Why Use D'OXYVA?

The link between oxygen and cancer is clear. In fact, an underlying cause of cancer is usually low cellular oxygenation levels.

In 1931 Dr. Warburg won his first Nobel Prize for proving cancer is caused by a lack of oxygen respiration in cells. He stated in an article titled “The Prime Cause and Prevention of Cancer… the cause of cancer is no longer a mystery, we know it occurs whenever any cell is denied 60% of its oxygen requirements…”

D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is an over-the-counter (OTC) device, which is the first biotech solution of its kind backed by widely-established groundbreaking Nobel Prize-winning science validated to significantly improve macro-, and micro-circulation of blood flow and certain nerve activities in the body such as the autonomic nervous system, which together are widely reported to form an effective solution option for many of the most severe and widespread health conditions.

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Yusuf Myers; a regular on the Dr. Oz Show on working out from home

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In the middle of a global pandemic, prioritizing your health and wellness is one of the smartest moves you can make. That’s true for everyone, but for Black Americans, it’s critical as this group faces a disproportionate rate of COVID-19 hospitalizations and death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Yusuf Myers, the founder, creator, and owner of PRX Workouts, emphasized the importance of self-care, like fitness, at a critical time like this. After all, some research suggests exercise may help reduce the risk of a severe respiratory complication called acute respiratory distress syndrome.

“I do not believe the problem is a lack of understanding of the importance of exercise, [because] Black people are very physical in their everyday lives and work,” he said. “However, there is a lack of viable, affordable resources and options for the Black community.”

Staying fit at home

Fortunately, you don’t need professional workout equipment to give your immune system a lift. Myers recommends starting small with simple exercises like burpees, jumping jacks, high knees, and standing up and sitting down on the couch or a chair.

“All these movements you can do from anywhere,” he said. “You do not need to be in a gym to practice them.”

He added that the goal is to get your heart rate up. “Other great examples include HITT training, walking outside with a mask on, taking the stairs, changing your rituals, and adding movement to your rituals.”

If you’re looking for a specific routine to get started, Myers recommended the following:

“Try doing 30 seconds of jumping jacks, then 30 seconds of an active rest, and then 30 seconds of jumping jacks again,” Myers said. “As you start to build your cardiovascular endurance and increase blood flow, you can continue to increase the time to 45 seconds, then to a minute.”

Nutrition-wise, he suggested cutting back on saturated fats and watching your caloric intake.

Finding support

Finally, he recommended building — and then leaning on — your support system, whoever that may be.

“I have created a platform and community filled with unity, trust, integrity, and a positive outlet to learn and grow for oneself and for others,” Myers said. “Not only during a trying time like COVID-19, but always.”

To stay motivated, Myers said you should seek out a virtual workout buddy or join an online program you think you’d enjoy. If you’re new to working out, trust the process.

“My job as a fitness leader in my community and virtually, touching people around the country and the world on social media, is to get people to realize nothing is impossible with hard work and consistency,” Myers said.

Source: https://www.futureofpersonalhealth.com/infectious-diseases/how-to-get-an-immunity-boosting-workout-at-home/

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Experts say D’OXYVA® can help patients find relief. Overwhelming published medical data shows people with preexisting conditions, including diabetes may experience serious complications with COVID-19. D’OXYVA significantly helps people and their pets by gently and quickly spraying a patented and patent-pending ultra-purified, supersaturated solution on the skin surface to achieve major health benefits for well over 90% of users. Experts call D’OXYVA a game-changer biotech.

“Studies with D’OXYVA have shown unmatched results in noninvasive wound care,” Dr. Michael McGlamry. Anyone with an underlying condition should know this option is available.

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New CDC data shows danger of coronavirus for those with diabetes, heart or lung disease, other chronic conditions

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People who have chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, lung disease and heart disease, face an increased chance of being hospitalized with covid-19 and put into intensive care, according to data released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that is consistent with reports from China and Italy.

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The new data gives the most sweeping look at the way covid-19 is causing serious illnesses among people in the United States who already face medical challenges.

The report reinforces a critically important lesson: Although the disease is typically more severe among older people, people of any age with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk if they contract the virus, for which there is no vaccine or approved drug treatment.

The CDC data is an initial description of how the disease appears to be affecting people who are already dealing with health challenges. The study did not break down the disease demographically, for example by age, sex, race or income. The agency also notes that this is essentially a snapshot and can’t capture the ultimate outcome for people who have been infected with the virus and haven’t yet recovered.

The report shows covid-19 is thrusting vulnerable people in the United States into intensive care units and disproportionately taking the lives of people who already face medical challenges.

The CDC analyzed more than 7,000 confirmed covid-19 cases across the country in which health officials had a written record about the presence or absence of any underlying medical condition. The preexisting conditions covered in the records include heart and lung diseases, diabetes, chronic renal disease, chronic liver disease, immunocompromised conditions, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental or intellectual disability, pregnancy, current or former smoker status, and “other chronic disease.”

The CDC found that, of people requiring admission to an intensive care unit, 78 percent had at least one underlying health condition. Of people hospitalized but not requiring ICU admission, 71 percent had at least one such condition, compared with just 27 percent of people who didn’t need to be hospitalized.

Among all the cases analyzed, 10.9 percent of patients had diabetes mellitus, 9.2 had chronic lung disease and 9 percent had cardiovascular disease.

The report did not reach any conclusion about whether the severity of an underlying condition correlated to a more severe covid-19 illness.

Of the 7,160 patients whose chronic illness status was known through health records, 184 died, and 173 of them had an underlying condition, the CDC said. None of the deaths were among people under age 19.

Covid-19 is a respiratory disease. The virus typically infects the upper respiratory tract, but it can also venture deeper into the lungs and in some patients results in pneumonia-like symptoms, requiring hospitalization and sometimes intubation on a ventilator. People who smoke or have chronic lung conditions are especially vulnerable.

Diabetes and heart disease are similarly worrisome. Someone already suffering from heart problems — whether they had previous heart attack or required a stent installed because of plaque buildup in their vascular system — may have a heart that cannot take as much strain as the average person, said Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease physician at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

When a patient gets infected with something like this coronavirus, the fever causes a spike in the heart rate. Shortness of breath means the patient gets less oxygen. People with limited cardiac capacity can go into arrest.

Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome that involves blood glucose levels and affects how the immune system works, and makes it less effective, Adalja said.

“This is why patients with diabetes are at risk for many infections not just coronavirus,” Adalja said. “They often struggle with infections on their skin and soft tissues, with pneumonia and even more serious conditions.”

Those in the high risk group need to be extremely careful.

“If they do become infected, the threshold for them seeking medical attention needs to be much lower. They and their clinicians have to keep this in mind,” Adalja said. “These numbers show us just how crucial that is.”

Wilbur Chen, an infectious-disease physician at the University of Maryland, added that while the virus seems to prey on the elderly and sick, “it does not mean it does not cause severe illness in younger adults or in children — in other words, the risk is not zero among the young.”

He said, “We are now documenting a large number of covid-19 infections across the U.S. and we are now observing more and more of these ‘rare’ events of severe illness and even deaths among the young.”

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D’OXYVA works to prevent sepsis, and resulting septic shock, using life-restoring molecule carbon dioxide (CO₂) and gentle vapor dissolved across the skin in a fast, painless, handheld  5-minute application — performed either in a clinical setting or in the comfort and privacy of your own home.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory and nerve stimulant solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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‘It literally came out of nowhere’: Mom, 39, warns others after suffering heart attack

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Jennifer Andrews was driving on a New Jersey highway last month when she suddenly suffered a massive heart attack. As she fell unconscious behind the wheel, her car careened down an embankment and stopped in heavy brush and trees. A Good Samaritan who saw what happened and followed had to resuscitate her three times to get her heart beating normally again.

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At 39, Andrews had never experienced any heart issues or symptoms before and was “completely blindsided,” she said.

“It literally came out of nowhere,” Andrews, an executive assistant who lives in borough of Washington, New Jersey, told TODAY. “It’s extremely scary. I feel like this is something that happens to 80-year-old men.”

Andrews was even more stunned since she had just gone to her primary care doctor for her annual checkup just two weeks before the episode. All the bloodwork came back fine, as did checks of her heart rate and blood pressure, she noted. She exercised regularly and led a low-stress life.

The mother of two did have risk factors, including smoking a few cigarettes a day, being overweight and having a family history of heart disease — her father died of heart problems in his mid-50s — but said it never crossed her mind to worry about her heart at her age.

After waking up in the hospital four days after the January 9 accident, Andrews was incredulous when doctors told her she had a 100% blockage in one of her coronary arteries, requiring a stent.

“I didn’t believe them. If it wasn’t for me waking up in the hospital with the tubes in my arm and the oxygen in my nose — and I could tell I had been intubated because my throat was hurting — I would have never believed it,” she said.

Know the risk factors and symptoms

It’s possible for people to do everything right and still have heart problems sneak up on them, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, a cardiologist and founder of the Women’s Heart Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

February is American Heart Month, an annual campaign to raise awareness of heart disease — the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S., yet many people still think of it as a “man’s illness.”

The risk goes up as people age, so heart attacks in premenopausal women are not common, but they do happen, Hayes noted. A recent study found heart attacks are on the rise in women between the ages of 35 and 54.

It leads expert to wonder: Are doctors are not paying enough attention to those women’s risk factors, or is the type of heart disease younger women develop fundamentally different than heart disease in the elderly or in men? The answer is probably a combination of both those factors, Hayes said.

Her research interest is spontaneous coronary artery dissection — a tear in a coronary artery wall — which often affects women who are otherwise healthy, with few or no risk factors for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

Hayes advised women under 50 who have suffered a heart attack with no risk factors to talk to their doctor about whether they had a SCAD or another heart attack cause not related to plaque buildup.

Hayes didn’t treat Andrews, but said it’s understandable why she would feel blindsided. A typical 39-year-old woman may be more focused on reproductive issues or the risk of breast cancer than her heart health because she probably doesn’t have any friends and family her age who have heart disease, Hayes noted.

The key for everyone is to pay attention to risk factors — including high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol levels, diabetes, excess weight, smoking and a family history of heart disease — and address the ones you can control.

For example, even light smoking — like the three or four cigarettes a day Andrews smoked before her accident — is a compelling risk factor for heart disease, Hayes said.

“But even people who optimally control all the risk factors still could have a heart attack,” Hayes said.

“Recognize it could happen and know what to do if you get the symptoms or somebody around you gets the symptoms.”

Chest pain is still the No. 1 warning sign for both sexes, but women can also experience different symptoms than men, including pain in the neck, jaw, throat, abdomen or in the upper back between the shoulder blades.

Andrews did have some upper back pain in the weeks leading up to her heart attack, but said that was typical for her and the condition was being treated by a chiropractor.

Since the heart attack, Andrews has quit smoking, is watching her salt, fat and cholesterol intake and feels fine, she said. There are new medications to take and doctors to visit during her follow-up care. The accident left her with bruising from the seat belt, but she’s recovering well.

“It was very eye-opening,” Andrews said about the ordeal, noting she was indebted to everyone who saved her life.

“I feel like ‘thank you’ isn’t enough. I don’t know what to say for them to understand how grateful I am.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

Taking D’OXYVA® daily promotes benefits related to significantly improved blood circulation, including significantly increased cardiac activity, physical fitness, metabolism, endurance, energy balance and a healthy weight.

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Treating Microcirculation Defects in Cardiovascular Diseases

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Defects in microcirculation have been documented as major factors in the development of cardiovascular diseases, especially type 1 diabetes.[1] By treating microcirculation defects, thus increasing blood and oxygen flow to the heart, the risk of recurrent significant cardiovascular events can be reduced significantly, and strength and endurance can improve.

An example of microcirculation compromise in a patient with severe cardiovascular disease can be seen in the clinical case of Leo B.

Leo was a 64-year-old male with a medical history of diabetes mellitus for 15 years, cigarette smoking, elevated cholesterol, and high LDL (harmful blood fat) levels.

Leo had a heart attack (myocardial infarction) several years ago.

He had suffered a myocardial infarction 6 weeks earlier and also suffered from exertional angina (chest pain with exertion).

He was taking lisinopril (20 mg per day) for high blood pressure, insulin for his diabetes, and one baby aspirin a day as a blood thinner to prevent another heart attack.

Leo was put on a cardiac rehabilitation regimen[2] consisting of a low-fat diet, moderate exercise, and stress control.

He used D’OXYVA[3]as an adjunct application, which helped increase his strength and endurance while decreasing his episodes of exertional chest pain.

What is Microcirculation? 

In general, microcirculation[4] refers to the smallest blood vessels in the body, consisting of the arterioles, venules, and capillaries.

These tiny blood vessels supply oxygen to the organs of the body and remove waste products produced by the body’s metabolism.

Smooth muscle cells, which are the lining cells of the arterioles and of some venules, are under the control of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and other chemical factors.

These influences help control the ability of the microcirculatory system to dilate and contract to increase or decrease circulation and oxygenation.

What is Coronary Microcirculation? 

Coronary microcirculation (microvascular network) refers to the smallest arterioles and venules that supply the heart.

These tiny branching blood vessels play crucial roles in supplying oxygen and removing waste products from the heart muscle.

When the heart requires more oxygen, the arterioles dilate, increasing blood flow to the heart.

This is especially important if a patient suffers from cardiovascular conditions such as angina or heart failure.

What Causes Cardiac Microcirculation Dysfunction? 

Dysfunction of cardiac microcirculation can be caused by many factors, including:

  • Dysfunction of the endothelial (lining) cells of the arterioles, which affects the ability of arterioles to dilate and allow for increased blood flow
  • Increased alpha 2 adrenergic activity, which leads to vasoconstriction and resultant decreased cardiac perfusion
  • Sclerosing of the arterioles, causing reduced blood flow and oxygenation
Conclusion

Microcirculation consists of the smallest blood vessels in the body and includes cardiac microcirculation, which plays a crucial role in supplying oxygen and removing waste products from the heart. The transdermal deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator D’OXYVA plays an important role in increasing blood flow (perfusion) and resultant oxygenation to the cardiovascular system. This increase in oxygenation has been found to help increase endurance and strength and is an important adjunct solution to consider as part of cardiac rehabilitation.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless over-the-skin microcirculatory solution that has been validated to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Diabetes, cardiovascular disease and the microcirculation

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), yet a significant proportion of the disease burden cannot be accounted for by conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertension occurs in majority of people with T2DM, which is substantially more frequent than would be anticipated based on general population samples. The impact of hypertension is considerably higher in people with diabetes than it is in the general population, suggesting either an increased sensitivity to its effect or a confounding underlying aetiopathogenic mechanism of hypertension associated with CVD within diabetes. In this contribution, we aim to review the changes observed in the vascular tree in people with T2DM compared to the general population, the effects of established anti-diabetes drugs on microvascular outcomes, and explore the hypotheses to account for common causalities of the increased prevalence of CVD and hypertension in people with T2DM.

Background

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and people with T2DM and hypertension have an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality compared with those with either condition alone. This excess risk is suggested to be due to the synergistic effect on large and small blood vessels simultaneously, thereby reducing the potential for compensatory collateralization protecting organs from the adverse consequences of damage to either vascular bed. The principle role of the vasculature is to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the tissues—whether that is the heart, the brain, or the kidney. The functional changes occurring in T2DM and hypertensive conditions significantly alter the hemodynamic stress on the heart and other organs. However, the different physiology, mechanisms and changes at the microvascular level differ from those at the macrovascular level in T2DM and hypertension, which in turn have significant implications with respect to future CV risk.

Conclusions

Over the past few decades, epidemiological studies have elucidated the role of impaired microcirculation in people with diabetes and aetiopathogenesis of CVD. This has led to the recognition of the prevalence of microvascular disease. Furthermore, the prognostic value of incidence of microvascular disease in predicting CVD is now acknowledged. The focus of present-day epidemiological studies is to understand the association between pathological mechanisms and the risk factors to ascertain whether they are targets of therapeutic value or risk markers of CVD. These studies have contributed to the evidentiary framework in favor of clinical monitoring of microvascular function, and spurred the initiation of mechanistic studies by redefining our knowledge of vascular disease, particularly in people with diabetes.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Over the past few decades, epidemiological studies have elucidated the role of impaired microcirculation in people with diabetes and aetiopathogenesis of CVD. D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Under Armour developing ‘smart’ sneaker that reads blood pressure

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Under ArmourOpens a New Window. is developing a “smart” sneaker that would track the blood pressure of its wearer, according to a patent filing this week.

The sports apparel brand’s filing with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office details two versions of a sneaker currently in development. The first version of the sneaker would link to a wearable device and transmit blood pressure that would then be used to adjust the sneaker’s fit for optimal blood flow. The second version of the sneaker contains a “blood pressure detector.”

In the patent filing, Under Armour said the sneaker is meant to help its wearer recover after a “strenuous workout.”

“There exists a need for a device and method to effectively pump blood through the plantar venous plexus and support recovery after engaging in athletic activity,” the company wrote in its filing, dated June 25.

Under Armour representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Baltimore Business Journal was first to report on the filing.

The filing comes as Under Armour and other sports apparel companies seek to integrate technology into their products.

The Baltimore-based company unveiled its first smart shoe, the “HOVR Connected Series,” in 2018. The footwear line measures a runner’s gait and other workout data.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

D’OXYVA promotes benefits related to significantly improved blood circulation, including significantly increased cardiac activity, physical fitness, metabolism, endurance, energy balance and a healthy weight by significantly improving Microcirculation that is detectable real-time with high quality diagnostics.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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The Alzheimer’s-blood pressure connection

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Rock legends David Bowie and Freddie Mercury must have known something that science discovered only recently. In their rock anthem “Under Pressure,” they crooned: “Pressure pushing down on me … Chipping around, kick my brains around the floor.”

Researchers wouldn’t put it quite that way, but there is a correlation between a person’s elevated blood pressure later in life and brain health, particularly Alzheimer’s disease risk. A study in Neurology recorded the blood pressure of 1,300 people ages 59 to 102 annually for a mean of eight years. Brain autopsies of deceased subjects then revealed a link between high blood pressure and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles, characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

An elevated systolic, or top number, above 134 mmHG increased the odds of developing brain lesions by nearly 50%. But according to Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, anything above 120 puts you in the “new risk zone.” The study didn’t find a correlation with an elevation of the diastolic (the bottom number) and Alzheimer’s.

The good news: Lifestyle changes can help you achieve a healthy blood pressure of around 120/75. The DASH, Mediterranean and “What to Eat When” diets are a smart starting point. Check out Sharecare.com for info on these nutritional approaches and to download a free phone app to keep track of your numbers. Plus, ask your doc about medications and at-home, self-measured blood pressure monitors; the cuff ones are usually reliable, but should be checked against one at your doc’s office.

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Men With Erectile Dysfunction May Also Want To See A Heart Doctor

Heart love

Troubles in the bedroom can be a double whammy for older men: Researchers have found that erectile dysfunction ups the risk for heart disease.

Their four-year study concluded that men whose impotence is vascular-related, not emotional, are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or sudden cardiac death.

This was true even without other heart risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol or a history of smoking.

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“The magnitude of the effect was surprising to me,” said study author Dr. Michael Blaha.

The findings suggest doctors should aggressively manage other risks such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol in men with erectile dysfunction, said Blaha. He is director of clinical research with the Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease in Baltimore.

The link between impotence and heart disease appears to be “a two-way street,” Blaha said, given that men who have had a heart attack appear to face a higher risk for ED.

For this study, the investigators tracked the heart health of about 1,900 men, ages 60 to 78, with and without vascular-related impotence.

Vascular impotence “is at its root a cardiovascular problem,” Blaha said. Unlike impotence related to anxiety or other psychological concerns, vascular ED stems from arterial blockage and insufficient blood flow.

“ED may be a sign of subclinical cardiovascular dysfunction,” said Blaha.

Experts have long observed that impotence is associated with poor cardiovascular health, but it was thought that obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes were some of the reasons why.

This study found that impotence on its own is a significant risk factor.

“In addition, this signal for increased risk is independent of depression and medication usage, said Blaha. That appears to negate theories that depression or its treatment might explain any link between impotence and heart disease.

Study participants were enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, conducted in several U.S. cities. Over four years, 115 men had a serious heart problem, such as heart attack, stroke or cardiac arrest.

The investigators determined that just over 6 percent of men with ED experienced such an event, compared with just under 3 percent of sexually healthy men.

So what should an impotent man do?

Blaha suggested a visit to a doctor or a preventive cardiologist. “In some cases, these men need screening for early cardiovascular disease,” he said.

“Many men at risk for cardiovascular disease seek medical care not for management of risk factors, but for their ED. Our study is an alert that such patients need a thorough cardiovascular evaluation in addition to their treatment for ED,” Blaha said

Dr. Richard Becker, an American Heart Association spokesman, said the study results need confirmation. Still, the strength of the findings were “striking,” he said.

“Health care providers should consider including ED as a component of assessing cardiovascular risk among middle-aged men,” said Becker, a professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati who was not involved with the study.

“While there are effective treatments for ED, one must never overlook an opportunity to ask a simple question: ‘Why?’ In addition, men should be aware of the potential implications of ED and inform their provider,” Becker said.

The findings were published June 11 in Circulation.

Source(s): https://www.cbsnews.com/news/men-with-erectile-dysfunction-may-also-want-to-see-a-heart-doctor/

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