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Have you heard of Tere’s inspiring diabetic story?

“My Doctor told me I have less than a year to live if I won’t let them amputate my leg, but I didn’t let them . . . here’s how I am still alive now!”

When doctors initially told 60-year-old Theresa “Tere” Schaufer that she had diabetes, she went into denial for 20 years.

“I was diagnosed with diabetes 20 years ago, and only when my doctor told me that they needed to cut my leg, did I realize that my diabetes was serious,” she says.

 

A major contributing factor

“Doctors told me the only way to survive this fight was to amputate my leg,” Schaufer says.  

She acknowledges that she had lived an unhealthy lifestyle for many years. Working in a restaurant as a cashier, she did very little exercise, ate fast food and drank sodas on a regular basis.

“If the doctor tells you you’re a diabetic, don’t ignore it. Don’t get to where I am. The sooner you accept things, the better it is for your health.”

Only after her doctor advised amputation did she realize the seriousness of her situation. Schaufer’s lifestyle had a hugely negative impact on controlling her diabetes. 

 

It was very painful!

Schaufer had puss from underneath her foot and necrotic toe. “After the doctor examined my foot, it was like decaying,” she says. “I couldn’t handle the pain. It was excruciating!” She was given less than a year to live because of her poor lifestyle.

 

I started to accept the situation.

Schaufer finally accepted her fate as a diabetic after the doctor told her that her leg would have to be amputated.

“I saw it coming. The pain was terrible. I could no longer handle it. At this point I was prepared; whatever came had to be.”

 

Unexpected turn of events

“I was browsing a support page I found on the web and read about a colleague’s experience with the microcirculation therapy she had tried. She noted that it had an amazing effect on her diabetic foot ulcer,” Schaufer says.

Right there on the support page, the woman raved, “There is this new technology you can buy online, D’OXYVA, which was voted one of the Top 10 Diabetes Care Solution Providers 2018! I didn’t have to amputate my leg because of this amazing product. In just four weeks, I can see my diabetic foot ulcer improving!”

“I read these words, and it gave me the hope I’d been praying for,” noted Schaufer.

She only had a month before her scheduled amputation, and without hesitation, she used the remaining days to try out D’OXYVA. She ordered the product online and closely collaborated with their in-house support.

“I was under D’OXYVA therapy for one month, taking it twice a day, once in the morning and once before bed as advised. It was very easy to use and non-invasive. In the first few days, I was skeptical as I wasn’t seeing any improvements, but I continued anyway and followed their suggested therapy guide,” Schaufer explains.

 

Thankful for D’OXYVA

When it was time for her to go back to her doctor and give her consent to amputate, her doctor was shocked to see her leg.

“What happened?” Those were the exact words my doctor asked upon seeing my leg after only a month. “Your wounds seemed to be healing from the inside,” my doctor said.

After a thorough check-up and the usual diagnostic check of my foot’s PI (perfusion index), he said the words that I never expected to hear. “We don’t need to amputate your leg anymore, but you need to continue whatever you’ve been doing for the past month.”

I then introduced him to D’OXYVA, and he was amazed by how this product had saved me.

 

Helping others

“I’m on my third month of D’OXYVA therapy, and it does amazing things for my health! I don’t think I have thanked D’OXYVA enough for this chance to live longer. I wouldn’t have the outlook on life that I have now,” Schaufer continues cheerfully.    

She is now also leading a healthy life. “This changed how I live my life, and I will continue sharing my experience as much as I can to help others.”

Schaufer often spends time with other “to-be-amputees” struggling to deal with their situation. “God gave me my situation to help others,” she maintains.

One of the ladies she counselled remarked how Schaufer had helped her tremendously. “She told me that I gave her her life back,” Schaufer says, breaking into tears.

“I’m in a way thankful for what I have been through with my diabetes because, without it, I wouldn’t have stumbled across my strength and my ability to help others.”

HOW CAN D’OXYVA HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Circularity Healthcare Named “Company of the Year” – Top 10 Diabetes Care Solution Providers 2018

BREAKING NEW GROUNDS IN Diabetes Care

According to the American Diabetes Association, millions of people around the world live with diabetes or know someone living with diabetes. No type of diabetes is curable yet; however, it is a very treatable disease, and no matter how frightening, annoying, and frustrating it can be, people with diabetes can live long, healthy, and happy lives. Our goal is to provide you the information, tools, and resources to help make that happen. In a recent statistics report from CDC National Diabetes Statistics, diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death.

With numerous methods on the market for managing and treating diabetes, there is one product that is a cut above the others when it comes to diabetes care–D’OXYVA by Circularity Healthcare. Setting a new paradigm in health science, D’OXYVA is a truly unique technology at its core, a first-of-its-kind biotech solution clinically validated to significantly lower the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

Circularity Healthcare was recently selected for the list of “Top 10 Diabetes Care Solution Providers of 2018” in the upcoming November Diabetes Care special edition of MedTech Outlook magazine after receiving more than 270 unique nominations from more than 39,000 qualified print and 66,000 qualified digital subscribers. The magazine does not rank the top ten providers; it lists them in alphabetical order on a full page. In addition, the magazine will run a featured article on Circularity and its D’OXYVA product line in the same special edition this November.

The future holds favorable prospects for Circularity Healthcare. They are expecting continued commercial growth with D’OXYVA, with other major announcements to follow shortly in multiple leading media outlets in the US and around the world as Circularity’s global marketing and PR campaign based on years of yet-unpublished highly successful clinical evidence unfolds in the coming weeks and months.

At the end of it all, D’OXYVA is indeed a revolutionary and a much-needed step toward a powerful and safe diabetes care solution that is adding immeasurable value to health outcomes.

 

December 2018 digital issue of MedTech Outlook: https://www.medicaltechoutlook.com/magazines/December2018/Diabetes_Care/#page=27

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Anesthesia, Microcirculation, and Wound Repair in Aging

Abstract

Age-related changes in skin contribute to poor wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include a decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types, and diminished microcirculation, the process that provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin; however, perioperative management can be modified to minimize damage to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control, and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence microcirculation in a number of ways, including cardiac output, arterial pressure, and local microvascular changes. The authors examined the role of anesthetic management in optimizing microcirculation and potentially improving postoperative wound repair in older persons.

Aged skin is at increased risk of poor postoperative wound healing. Changes in the cutaneous microcirculation with aging contribute to this risk. This review examines the role of anesthesia management in microcirculatory function.

SURGICAL wound repair is a major problem in the older population, who are at increased risk of wound dehiscence and infection. As a specific example, surgical site infections (SSIs) are common (approximately 500,000 cases annually in the United States), lead to worse patient outcome (patients who develop SSI are twice as likely to die), and are an enormous economic burden (1–10 billion dollars annually). Many factors contribute to age-related changes in skin5 and subsequent vulnerability to impaired wound healing and infection. Changes in skin with age (fig. 1) include a decline in epidermal and dermal thickness and composition, as well as a decrease in the number of most resident cell types. The dermal–epidermal junction is flattened and the microcirculation is diminished. The latter is defined as blood flow through arterioles, capillaries, and venules and is the key system that affects the entire skin surface. In the aging patient, the microcirculation in the skin is reduced by 40% between the ages of 20 and 70 yr. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid hemostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause disruption of the microcirculation in the skin as manifested by local edema resulting from vasodilation and increased vascular permeability.

Fig. 1.
Numerous changes in skin with age contribute to impaired wound healing.

 

Perioperative management can be modified to optimize the microcirculation. Measures that support the microcirculation include careful use of fluids, normothermia, pain control, and smoking cessation. Factors that can be influenced by intraoperative management (judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control, and increased tissue oxygen tension) have been suggested to be beneficial as well. Most anesthetic agents also influence the microcirculation: a reduction in cardiac output and arterial pressure decreases flow in the microcirculation, whereas anesthetic-induced local microvascular changes and vasodilatation can increase perfusion. Optimization of these variables plays an important role in enhancing the microcirculation in all patients, but is especially relevant if modifications could improve postoperative wound healing in the older population.

In this review, we will use skin as a representative organ to describe age-related changes that negatively affect the microcirculation and have subsequent impacts on wound healing and the incidence of postoperative infection. We will then examine the role of anesthesia management in minimizing detrimental effects on the microcirculation. A greater understanding of these variables could promote improvements that lead to better outcomes with respect to wound repair in older patients.

Summary of Wound Repair and Aging

It has been nearly a century since it was noted that the rate of cutaneous scar formation after a wound is inversely related to the age of the patient. Four decades ago, it was observed that older age was associated with an increased risk of postoperative disruption of the surgical wound, leading to higher mortality. Recent data suggest that in patients older than 65 yr, development of SSI is associated with a two-fold increase in cost and a staggering four-fold increase in mortality.

Wound healing ensues via a sequential chain of events (with variable overlap) that includes inflammation, tissue formation, and remodeling (fig. 2). Circulating factors have a pivotal role in each of these phases. Accordingly, as we will discuss below, immediate changes in the microcirculation influence each stages of the wound-healing response in aging. As human data is lacking, we have taken data from established animal models of aging. Although animal models are not uniformly predictive of responses in human tissues, several animal models of wound healing are generally accepted.

Fig. 2.

The stages of wound healing are a sequential chain of events that include: (A) inflammation, (B) proliferation and granulation tissue formation, and (C) extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and tissue remodeling. PDGF = platelet-derived growth factor; TGF-β1 = transforming growth factor-β1; TNF-α = tumor necrosis factor-α; VEGF = vascular endothelial growth factor.

 

Summary

Nearly every anesthesiologist who provides care to adults will participate in the care of geriatric patients. A growing older population is undergoing surgical procedures that are increasing in number and complexity. Poor healing of surgical wounds is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and substantial economic burden. Wound healing is dependent on the microcirculation that supplies the incision area. Measures that support the microcirculation during the perioperative period have a profound effect on wound healing. Some measures such as maintenance of normal body temperature and control of postoperative pain are supported by ample evidence and have been implemented in routine clinical care. Other measures, for example, the choice of anesthesia technique and use of opioids are supported by basic research but need further clinical studies. A better understanding of the effect of aging and anesthesia on the microcirculation can potentially assist in improving postoperative wound repair, thereby benefiting a growing older population.

 

The Surgical Context of Wound Repair and Aging

Measures that support the microcirculation improve wound repair, thereby reducing the risk of postoperative dehiscence and infection.52General preoperative measures such as smoking cessation and optimal management of comorbid medical conditions have been reviewed in other contexts.53,54 For the purpose of this review, we will focus on interventions in the perioperative setting.

Oxygen Administration

Wound healing is dependent upon adequate levels of oxygen.55 Oxygen interacts with growth factor signaling and regulates numerous transduction pathways necessary for cell proliferation and migration.56 It is also an indispensable factor for oxidative killing of microbes.57 Consequently, the effects of oxygen tension on the outcome of surgical wounds have been best studied in the context of postoperative infection. Resistance to surgical wound infection is presumed to be oxygen dependent—with low oxygen tension viewed as a predictor of the development of infection,56 particularly when subcutaneous tissue oxygenation (measured by a polarographic electrode) decreases to less than 40 mmHg.58

In two recent meta-analyses, one found that perioperative supplemental oxygen therapy exerts a significant beneficial effect on the prevention of SSIs,59 whereas the other suggested a benefit only for specific subpopulations.60 Although most authors suggest that supplemental oxygen during surgery is associated with a reduction in infection risk,61,62 others propose it may be associated with an increased incidence of postoperative wound infection.63Notably, in the latter report, the sample size was small and there was a difference in the baseline characteristics of the groups. A prospective trial randomizing patients to either 30 or 80% supplemental oxygen during and 2 h after surgery did not find any difference in several outcome measures including death, pulmonary complications, and wound healing.64 Of note, the administration of oxygen to aged subjects may be limited by the finding that although arterial oxygen tension did not decrease with age, there was reduced steady-state transfer of carbon monoxide in the lungs.65 This indicates that oxygen transport could be diffusion-limited in older subjects, especially when oxygen consumption is increased. Furthermore, longitudinal studies of five healthy men over 3 decades showed impaired efficiency of maximal peripheral oxygen extraction,66 suggesting that tissue oxygen uptake is reduced in the aged subjects.67 This likely reflects a decrease in the number of capillaries as well as a reduction in mitochondrial enzyme activity.68 Animal models (rabbit69 and mouse69,70 ) have suggested that aging and ischemia have an additive effect on disruption of wound healing. Consequently, the potential benefit of increasing tissue oxygen tension during surgical wound repair in older patients should be further evaluated.

 

 

Reference: http://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=1917910

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Can Oxygen Therapy Improve Brain Blood Vessel Function in COPD Patients?

By Allison Inserro

Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brains of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in Experimental Physiology.

The study revealed that patients with COPD are at higher risk of dementia, possibly because of lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from brain blood vessels. According to other research cited in the study, giving patients with COPD additional oxygen reduced their risk of developing dementia, but the mechanisms underlying this effect had not been explored.

The latest research aimed to establish the effect of supplying additional oxygen in blood flow to the brain and blood vessel function in patients with COPD. Fourteen hypoxemia patients were included in the study, which tracked cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen delivery (CDO2), and neurovascular coupling (NVC), which is the relationship between local neuron activity and changes in CBF.

The researchers used ultrasound to view and measure blood flow in the brain in these patients at rest as well as before and during delivery of the additional oxygen. Ultrasound was used to measure the extent to which brain blood flow increased.

Participants began this test with their eyes shut, then opened them and read a piece of text. This test was designed to increase activity in the brain, and brain blood flow was expected to increase to provide an adequate oxygen supply.

Pairing these ultrasound measures with a measurement of blood oxygen levels allowed authors to estimate how much oxygen delivery to the brain increased during the eyes-open reading test.

Measurements were assessed, and the authors found that blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain significantly increased during reading because blood vessels in the brain dilated in response to the greater oxygen demand when the brain was active.

Specifically, peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation increased from 91 ± 3.3 to 97.4 ± 3% (P <.01). CBF was unaltered (593.0 ± 162.8 vs 590.1 ± 138.5 mL min−1; P = .91) with supplemental O2.

However, CDO22 (98.1 ± 25.7 versus 108.7 ± 28.4 ml dl−1; P = 0.02) and NVC improved.

The posterior cerebral artery cerebrovascular conductance increased after O2 normalization (+40%, from 20.4 ± 9.9 to 28 ± 10.4% increase in conductance; P = .04). The posterior cerebral artery cerebrovascular resistance decreased to a greater extent during O2 normalization (+22%, from −16.7 ± 7.3 to −21.4 ± 6.6% decrease in resistance; P = .04).

The cerebral vasculature of patients with COPD appears insensitive to oxygen because CBF was unaltered in response to O2 supplementation, leading to improved CDO2.

Providing extra oxygen to patients with COPD improved the function of blood vessels in the brain by increasing blood supply to meet the demands of the brain’s activity during this short test.

Other research is needed to see how long-term oxygen use would impact the function of brain blood vessels.

These improvements might provide a physiological link between oxygen therapy and a reduced risk of cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia.

Ref: https://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/can-oxygen-therapy-…

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10 Things You Should Know About DVT

One of the most important things to talk about in relation to DVT, is varicose veins.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is the result of blood clotting whilst it is still inside the blood vessel. In the majority of cases, painful swelling in the leg will be experienced as a ‘warning sign’ however, this is not always the case and, in some instances, no obvious symptoms will be presented.

In short, a DVT is a clot in the deep vein

Despite the fact that many people could be at risk of developing DVT, there is still much uncertainty as to how to prevent the condition from occurring, and a general lack of awareness around the importance of speaking medical treatment if you think you are suffering from the condition.

Here, to help provide some clarity on the condition, leading vascular specialist Professor Mark Whiteley of The Whiteley Clinic, shares the ten key things everyone should know:

 

DVT CAN OCCUR FOR NO APPARENT REASON

Professor Whiteley says: “Although there are some recognised risk factors for DVT, the condition can also effect people for no apparent reason. If there is a clear reason why DVT has occurred, we call it “provoked” DVT. If there is no known reason for DVT then we call it an “unprovoked” case.

Studies have shown that over 80% of hospital patients will experience a minor DVT. One in 12 people who fly long haul, over 7 hours, will also experience a minor case. However, in most cases these cases will resolve themselves and will not cause the individual any lasting problems. In fact, many people may not even know they’ve had a problem.

However, we must be careful not to trivialise DVT as some individuals will experience much more serious symptoms – such as aching/pain and swelling, clots to the lung (called pulmonary embolism) , and/or scarring of the deep vein with long-term deterioration of the leg post thrombotic syndrome (PTS).”

 

DVT PRESENTS A NUMBER OF SYMPTOMS

Professor Whiteley says: “Although in some cases there will be no symptoms associated with DVT, in others there will be some distinct warning signs. These can include: pain/swelling/tenderness in the leg (usually in the calf), a heavy aching feeling, warm skin around the affected area, or a redness to the skin. If anyone is concerned that they may be experiencing any of these symptoms, and they become breathless or experience chest pain, then they should seek medical attention immediately.”

 

PREGNANCY INCREASES YOUR RISK OF A DVT

Professor Whiteley says: “Pregnancy can increase the risks of DVT, particularly at the time of delivery. A normal adult has approximately 5L of blood. However, pregnant women increase their blood volume to 7L at the end of pregnancy. This is because women lose blood whilst giving birth and so the body produces more to keep at a safe level. Not only do women have extra blood, their body also adapts to clot blood quicker after they have given birth to stop haemorrhages.

Unfortunately, the downside of this is that it increases the risk of DVT. If a woman is pregnant and has varicose veins, then the risk is increased even more so.

 

COMPRESSION STOCKINGS ARE KEY FOR PREVENTION

Professor Whiteley says: “Wear properly measured and fitted graduated compression stockings if you are ever in a position where you cannot move easily such as on a long flight, long car journey, long coach journey etc.

 

VARICOSE VEINS ARE A SERIOUS FACTOR

Professor Whiteley says: “One of the most important things to talk about in relation to DVT, is varicose veins. Varicose veins occur when the flow of blood within a vein changes. Blood can fall backwards down your veins with gravity if the valves are not working properly – stretching the vein walls as a result. With the flow of blood changing, and the vein wall changing, this is serious potential for clots forming in the veins.

When a clot forms in a varicose vein, it is called “phlebitis”. Since 2012, it has been known that everyone with phlebitis should have a duplex scan for the following reason. If the clot is small and in a varicose vein a long way from the deep veins, then it can be treated safely with aspirin and support stockings. However, if it is within 5 cm of a deep vein, there is a risk of it causing a clot on the lung (pulmonary embolism). Of course, having varicose veins treated properly by the new endovenous techniques will stop the risks of phlebitis and any other associated problems.”

 

POOR LIFESTYLE CAN INCREASE YOUR RISK

Professor Whiteley says: “Other known factors for developing DVT are malignancy, immobility, major surgery, dehydration, smoking (particularly if combined with oral contraceptive pill) and a family history of getting DVTs (called thrombophilia).”

 

A SLOW BLOOD FLOW IS CRITICAL

Professor Whiteley says: “In short, a DVT is a clot in the deep vein. Clots form because of one or more of three main reasons – changes in the composition of the blood, changes in the flow of blood, or changes in the vein wall. Any one of these, or combination of these, can increase the risk of a deep vein thrombosis.”

 

DVT CAN BE FATAL

Professor Whiteley says: “Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a diagnosis that will cause huge concern for many patients. However, as with many medical conditions, DVT can affect people in different ways. DVTs can be tiny, and of no significance, or can be huge and can be life threatening. Of course between these two extremes, there is also a whole scale. A duplex ultrasound scan will be able to diagnose a DVT and also assess how severe it is.

The risks associated with DVT are reduced both in the short term (clots to the lung) and in the long term (post thrombotic syndrome-swollen and discoloured leg with or without leg ulceration) if the DVT is diagnosed early and treated aggressively with anticoagulation.”

If DVT is not treated, around one in 10 people will develop a pulmonary embolism. This is a serious condition which can cause chest pain, sudden collapse and/or either gradual or sudden breathlessness.

 

EXERCISE IS KEY FOR RECOVERY

Professor Whiteley says: “People undergoing major surgery nowadays get blood thinners and support stockings to try and reduce the risk of DVT. Physiotherapists also try to mobilise patient as soon as possible after such operations. Many Surgeons today also prefer local anaesthetic procedures so that their patients can “walk in, walk out”, and keep mobile. This new “ambulatory” surgery performed in local anaesthetic clinics dramatically reduces risks of deep vein thrombosis.

Anything that increases the flow of blood in the veins will reduce the risk of clots, and therefore reduce the risk of DVT. Exercise and movement, particularly walking, is so important. Compression stockings, particularly if properly fitted, have been shown to reduce the risk of DVT but this is markedly enhanced by movement of walking. Those who cannot walk or move often require anticoagulation injections or tablets.”

 

THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO PREVENT A DVT

Professor Whiteley says: “Keep hydrated, keep active and mobile – particularly through lots of walking. Treat varicose veins as quickly as possible with an endovenous technique, under local anaesthetic, to reduce risk of DVTs occurring.”

 

Reference: https://www.femalefirst.co.uk/health/10-things-you-should-know-about-dvt-1146974.html

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Being mindful of symptoms

LEWISTOWN–Dr. Maya Lichtenstein, neurologist at Geisinger-Lewistown Hospital, said that there are a myriad of potential symptoms that could be signs of a stroke. “Any sudden changes,” said Lichtenstein, “go the E.R.”

A stroke, according to Liechtenstein, is either the result of not enough blood flow to the brain, plaque in the blood vessels or heart, each resulting in a clot, or a hemorragic bleed, resulting in a bursted blood vessel in the brain. Classic symptoms of a stroke include numbness, tingling, weakness on one side of the body and changes in speech, but other sudden changes in in understanding language, vision, vertigo or clumsiness can also be symptomatic.

“It depends on what part of the brain is damaged,” said Lichtenstein.

Treatment options for a stroke vary, depending on the type of stroke.

“If you get seen fast enough,” said Lichtenstein, for a clot, a “clot-busting medication, a form of blood thinner” can be administered via I.V. A thrombectomy, a procedure, not an operation, said Lichtenstein, is another treatment option, similar to a cardiac catheterization. A bleeding stroke often leads to lowering the patient’s blood pressure and surgically relieving pressure on the brain. Taking aspirin can also treat a stroke.

Post-stroke, Liechtenstein said that rehabilitation is important, including physical, occupational, speech, and cognitive therapies. “Aggressive therapy can continue to improve people’s symptoms,” said Lichtenstein. “Everyone thinks they’re better if they can move their arms and legs.” Lichtenstein also encourages stroke patients to be aware of their mood and possible depression, encouraging them to accept all the help available.

To avoid a stroke, Liechtenstein said patients should see their doctors regularly for preventive care and that leading a healthy lifestyle is the key, including regular exercise to keep up the heart rate and eating a diet rich in fresh fruit and vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains. Lichtenstein also encourages patients to keep control of their vascular issues, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, as well as to quit smoking, if they smoke.

 

Reference: http://www.lewistownsentinel.com/news/local-news/2018/05/being-mindful-of-symptoms/

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Are Veiny Arms Really a Sign You’re Super Fit?

You’ve seen the crazy photo of cyclist Pawel Poljanski’s insane leg veins after his 70-hour Tour de France pump. And the Rock boasts a pretty impressive bicep vein, too. Plus, go to any bodybuilding competition, and you’ll see a whole slew of guys with impressive vascularity as well.

What all these veiny guys have in common is that they are in tremendous shape. But is vascularity really a sign of superb fitness?First, let’s take a look at the reason your veins pop in the first place.

Your arteries carry blood away from your heart to the tissues throughout your body, like your muscles. Your veins—which have thin walls and dilate easily—pump the blood back toward your heart.

“The venous outflow is slower than arterial inflow, causing a back-up of venous blood causing higher pressure in the veins,” says Doug McGuff, M.D., author of Body By Science. That increases pressure causes the veins to “pop” out. That’s the pump you get.

But what you’re doing also plays a role in the pop, too.

“Swelling in the muscles pushes the veins out to the surface,” says Spencer Nadolsky, D.O., author of The Fat Loss Prescription. “Your muscles swell when working out and push the veins closer to the surface of your skin, which makes them more pronounced.”

You probably notice your veins popping more during weight lifting than when you’re simply taking a walk or doing other kinds of light cardio.

In general, higher-rep weight lifting with fast concentric movements—say, the part of a biceps curl when you bring the weight up toward your arm—would trigger the biggest pump, says Dr. Nadolsky.

“High intensity interval work can produce this effect as well,” says Dr. McGuff. “Muscular loading and fatigue drive arterial inflow into the muscle, so exercise that triggers this will produce venous engorgement.”

Okay, so your veins tend to pop when you’re working out, but does how veiny you get actually depend on how fit you are? Well, sort of.

The leaner you are—meaning, the less subcutaneous fat you have covering your muscles—the more pronounced your veins will look, says Dr. Nadolsy.

But it’s not just about being lean: Having low body fat along with upped muscle mass is the magic combination for veins that pop, even when you’re at rest. So in some ways, pronounced veins are an indirect sign of fitness.

 

 

Reference: https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/vascularity-and-fitness-level

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Diabetes – Understanding a Debilitating Disease and Its Complications

by Dr. James O.

Honors in Epidemiology, Ophthalmology Electives and Albert Einstein College of Medicine

A Sad Case Struggling with Diabetes – Most people remember the popular movie Animal House and would recognize the popular character Flounder, who was played by the actor Stephen Furst. A recent article in “PeopleCelebrity” (people.com) is useful, for it describes Furst’s lackadaisical attitude toward diabetes, which eventually killed him at the age of 63.

According to the article, both of Furst’s parents died from diabetes-related complications when he was only 16 years old. Several weeks later, Furst himself was diagnosed with diabetes, but he basically ignored his condition, stating: “I went into denial…I didn’t realize the long-term effects.”

Unfortunately, after many years spent battling obesity and diabetes, Furst died on June 16, 2017 from “complications of diabetes.”

What Is Diabetes Mellitus – Diabetes mellitus is a devastating chronic illness that can have horrific and debilitating consequences. This condition, if left untreated, can lead to amputations of multiple limbs, blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, strokes, hypertension, dental disease, poor wound healing, impotence, loss of sensation in limbs, and many other serious health conditions.

Definition – There are three general types of diabetes. Diabetes mellitus type one, which is also called juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in childhood and accounts for approximately 5% of cases of diabetes. This type of diabetes is usually caused by the body’s inability to produce insulin. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is the most common type of diabetes; it involves an elevation of blood-glucose levels in adults.

This can be due either to the lack of production of the hormone insulin by the pancreas or to the development of a condition called insulin resistance, in which the body’s cells no longer react normally to insulin, thereby preventing insulin from transporting glucose from the blood into the cells. The third type of diabetes is gestational diabetes, which refers to the development of high blood-sugar levels during pregnancy.

Statistics – According to Healthline (healthline.com), 29.1 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of 245 billion dollars per year in health expenses (in 2012), with an estimated 8.1 million more people unaware that they too have the condition. Furthermore, in the United States, approximately 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. Worldwide, “[d]iabetes kills 1.5 million people every year” (healthline.com).

Risk Factors – Risk factors for diabetes mellitus include obesity, smoking, (advanced) age, sedentary lifestyle, positive family history, poor diet, elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, and hypertension. Also, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Americans and Hispanic Americans all have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

Warning Signs of Diabetes – Common symptoms of diabetes include severe thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, intense hunger, blurred vision, poor healing of wounds, dry and itchy skin, and yeast infections.

Complications – One of the major complications of diabetes is damage to what is called the body’s “microcirculation.” This term refers to the circulation of blood in the smallest blood vessels, which are composed of terminal arterioles, capillaries, and venules.

The arterioles (tiny arteries) carry oxygenated blood to the capillaries, where oxygen is then transported to the tissues. The venules (tiny veins) carry deoxygenated blood and C02 from the capillaries to the larger veins.

It is critical for microcirculation to work optimally because its function is critical to the regulation of blood flow, tissue perfusion, normal blood pressure, and normal oxygen delivery and cellular-waste removal.

Studies have shown that early in the course of diabetes, changes begin to occur, namely damaging and thickening the “basement membranes” of microcirculation. This causes alterations in blood-flow properties, alterations in oxygen transport, and changes in homeostasis.

These changes in blood supply, tissue perfusion, and oxygen delivery eventually lead to a progressive loss of nerve-fiber function, causing neuropathy, chronic pain, and numbness.

The damage to microcirculation also causes peripheral vascular disease, which can lead to tissue necrosis, nonhealing ulcers, gangrene, and eventual limb amputation. It is estimated that 2 to 6% of patients with diabetes will develop a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) that eventually becomes infected. Infected DFUs, in turn, can lead to foot or leg amputation, with 50% of those with amputations dying within 5 years.

Diagnosis – Diabetes can be diagnosed using several common blood tests or urinalysis revealing elevated levels of glucose. A fasting blood sugar over 125 mg/dl (for reference, the normal value is less than 100 mg/dl) may indicate diabetes; a Hgb A1C blood test with a value over 5.7%, which measures average blood-sugar levels over a 3-month period, may also indicate diabetes. Another valuable diagnostic test is the glucose tolerance test used to measure blood-sugar levels 3 hours after oral administration of a sugary syrup.

Traditional Treatments – First-line traditional treatment of diabetes usually involves weight loss, a healthy diet low in carbohydrates and high in fruits and vegetables, and increased exercise for at least 20 minutes 3 times a week.
If diet and exercise are not sufficient to lower blood sugar to normal levels, then medication may be necessary. The first medication usually administered is metformin. Metformin, also known as Glucophage, is an oral medication usually taken twice per day; it works by decreasing the level of sugar produced by the liver and by increasing cells’ sensitivity to insulin. It also lowers the amount of glucose absorbed by the intestines.

Since metformin is metabolized by the liver, if someone has decreased liver function caused by liver disease, this may lead to a buildup of metformin, in turn inducing lactic acidosis, which can cause severe medical conditions and even death.

In the same way, since Metformin is excreted from the body by the kidneys, those with kidney disease and/or lowered kidney function are also at risk of lactic acidosis when taking metformin.

Other types of oral medications are also available to treat diabetes. If these medications fail, daily insulin administration can be given either through injections, inhalation, or an insulin pump.

Traditional treatments of diabetic vascular disease causing impaired circulation include revascularization surgery and angioplasties. Treatment of the tingling, numbness, and sharp pain from diabetic neuropathy include medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin), pregablin (Lyrica), and the antiseizure medicine Tegretol.

Alternative treatments for diabetic neuropathy include Chinese medicine, acupuncture, aromatherapy, massage therapy, reflexology, homeopathy, and biofeedback.

Another treatment that has shown great promise both for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy and diabetic microvascular disease is D’OXYVA. This is a noninvasive, nonopioid transdermal delivery system of medical carbon dioxide (C02) and water vapor that boosts microcirculation, balances the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, lowers blood pressure, decreases chronic pain, promotes healing of wounds and ulcers, and helps prevent amputations.

D’OXYVA improves blood circulation by means of a transdermal transfer of C02 using a transmission device placed over the thumb for a 5-minute period.
Numerous studies have shown “sustained, remote vasodilation and decreased systolic blood pressure” with the use of D’OXYVA. This is because bathing the tissues in C02 stimulates vasodilation in the periphery of the body, thereby improving circulation, blood flow, and oxygenation levels.

In one particular case, a male patient suffering severe diabetic neuropathy and intractable ulcers and open sores on his legs, along with hypertension and an inability to sleep due to severe pain, was placed on D’OXYVA via his thumb for 5 minutes twice a day for 6 weeks.

By the end of the 6-week period, the patient reported a significant decrease in pain; he reported being able to sleep through the night for the first time in years and reported that most of his leg wounds had healed. In addition, his blood pressure dropped from 188/130 to 135/95 within 30 minutes of each application.

Summary – Diabetes is an insidious chronic condition that devastates both patients and families. Increased awareness and preventive measures, such as controlling diet and increasing regular exercise, can encourage weight loss and hopefully prevent the development or worsening of diabetes and the need for oral medications or treatment with insulin. In addition, new advances in therapy such as D’OXYVA offer a noninvasive, transdermal, low-cost, and very effective alternative to help stop the intractable chronic pain of diabetic neuropathy and to help prevent limb amputations.

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Breaking News from the PWCS Regional Conference

Following Successful Wound Healing Pilot Study, Circularity Launches Multicenter Clinical Trials, Business Initiatives with Influential Experts Across the Region

The Philippine Wound Care Society is a non profit, non stock, SEC registered organization. It was founded on September 09, 2009 with the purpose of improving the wound management in the Philippines through education. The society which is composed of physicians from different specialty groups and allied services (wound care nurse, physical therapy) brings together professionals involved in wound care.
 
The organization held its 1st regional meeting last February 26-27, 2015 at Cebu City Philippines. InvisiDerm’s CEO, Norbert Kiss and Senior Sales and Marketing Manager, Jennifer Rose Boadilla were invited by the President of the organization, Dr. Martin Anthony A. Villa and got the chance to meet some of the most influential cardiovascular and wound care KOLs at the said event.
 
The event was professional and had overwhelming participation exceeding the initially registered numbers. The speakers and their presentations were high quality and informative showcasing the latest in technologies and approaches to wound management.
 
We are glad to announce that InvisiDerm has secured some of the most influential cardiovascular and wound care KOLs from Taiwan, Singapore, Japan, Korea, Philippines and a few other countries via strategic relationships at this Philippine Wound Care Society Regional Meeting. In addition, a protocol for a comprehensive multicenter study coupled with diagnostics for diabetic foot wound healing on hundreds of subjects at leading hospitals, and an academic level study into the biochemical properties of D’OXYVA in wound healing, and a study for erectile dysfunction in diabetics was finalized, agreed and initiated with several KOLs based on the successful pilot study conducted by Dr. Harikrishna R. Nair at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The quality of life benefits for patients such as significantly improved sleeping, eating, mood and pain makes D’OXYVA a distinct winner besides being noninvasive and fast without negative side effects. Furthermore, InvisiDerm has met regional directors of several leading wound care products multinationals and their distributors for in-depth private discussions about business models and development challenges across Asia. Circularity is clearly a leader in a number of aspects if not most. Special thanks to the team at Getz Bros. Philippines for their warm hospitality.
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Improved Microcirculation Against Diabetes, Stroke and Several Other Diseases

Exercise has been shown to protect against diabetes, stroke and several other diseases and to improve our moods.

But does it also make us more likely to engage in other activities? Do people who exercise tend to have better social lives or achieve more of their goals?

All clinical evidence so far validates that the science of exercise physiology best explains the outsized and unmatched vast health benefits of D’OXYVA® (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) and opens up entirely new ways of thinking about the treatment of the underlying causes of the most severe and widespread medical conditions.