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4 Holistic and Traditional Ways to Decrease Anxiety and Improve Overall Health

decrease anxiety

By Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD, Medical Director of ReLife Miami Institute

Anxiety can take over and leave you feeling like you have no control over your mental health. Your autonomic nervous system is impacted, causing you to have somatic complaints or symptoms when you experience anxiety. Medication can help reduce the severity of your response to anxiety, while supplements such as D’OXYVA can help regulate your autonomic nervous system through the process of microcirculation. Anxiety can be better managed when you look at both holistic and traditional treatment in order to deal with your symptoms.

 
1. Acupuncture and the Relief of Anxiety Symptoms

Acupuncture is a treatment that has been around for centuries in Eastern medicine. Your acupuncturist will talk to you about the symptoms you are trying to relieve through acupuncture and use specific pressure points to address your concerns. Acupuncture works on your energy meridians, and it is thought that when your energy is unblocked, your symptoms improve. Many people find relief through acupuncture for a wide range of health issues, including anxiety and other mental health diagnoses.

2. Autonomic Nervous System Regulation and Microcirculation

Your autonomic nervous system is responsible for regulating functions of the body such as digestion, breathing, heart rate and urination. When you support your autonomic nervous system with supplements like D’OXYVA, the process of microcirculation brings the nutrients to your system to help keep your system in better control. If you experience anxiety with a rapid heart rate, D’OXYVA can help reduce this reaction in order to produce a less somatic response to anxiety triggers.

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3. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Anxiety

The use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT, is a common therapeutic approach to anxiety treatment. You work closely with a therapist to discuss thoughts and patterns of behavior that lead to negative symptoms. Together you develop better coping skills by addressing negative thoughts and learn how to change these thoughts into more positive ones. Therapy is an effective tool for anxiety when used in combination with other methodologies for nearly complete relief.

 

4. Deep Breathing and Meditation

When you focus on deep breathing, you can physically stop anxiety symptoms in their tracks. Your body produces cortisol, which is the stress response hormone that gets your heart rate up and sweat to break out. When you learn meditation, you learn ways to get better control of your breath. You will be taught deep breathing strategies to slow down your heart rate and get your autonomic nervous system back in control of your body.

Overall health can be improved when you adopt a routine exercise program and you focus on good nutrition to keep your body healthy. Pay attention to your caffeine intake when you have anxiety, and stay away from caffeine if your symptoms get worse. You can manage anxiety when:

  • You take therapies such as D’OXYVA to support your autonomic nervous system
  • Your nutrition is optimized for better overall health
  • Therapy is in place to work through triggers and teach you better coping skills
  • You try meditation and acupuncture to get control over your symptoms

Holistic and traditional therapies are both effective at managing the symptoms of anxiety. You don’t have to live with debilitating anxiety when you are able to support your overall health with a good diet, supplements, and the right therapy in place.

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About The Author
D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD is a Neurosurgeon that has been in practice in Florida for almost 30 years. He graduated from Tufts University School Of Medicine and then did additional training at NYU, Brown University and Harvard Medical School affiliated Hospitals, as well as other prestigious institutions. He holds several US patents for medical inventions and has worked with professional sports teams including the NHL Florida Panthers hockey team, the NFL Miami Dolphins football team, and the ABA Florida Pitbulls basketball team. He is currently the Medical Director of the ReLife Miami Institute.

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Ways To Deal with Depression

depression

By Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD, Medical Director of ReLife Miami Institute

According to American Psychiatric Association (APA), Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) in any given year. And one in six people (16.6%) will experience depression at some time in their life. Depression can strike at any time, but on average, first appears during the late teens to mid-20s.

When you’re dealing with clinical depression, everything in life can feel exhausting. While selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, can help, the side effects of these medications may make you want to learn more about non-medication options for treating depression. Let’s talk about some of the non-SSRI options for treating depression.

Non-SSRI Options For Treating Depression And Other Mental Health Issues

Swipe through each images to learn what are the other non-SSRI options for treating depression and other mental health issues​.

Exercise
It sounds almost too good to be true, but exercise is an effective method of treatment for low to moderate depression. Studies have shown that moderate to intense exercise most days of the week works as well as a low dose antidepressant for mild to moderate depression. Exercise can be great at relieving symptoms of depression on its own or in combination with SSRI treatment.
Talk therapy
Depression is caused by an imbalance of chemicals in the brain, and negative thought patterns can contribute to this imbalance. It can be hard to put a stop to these patterns on your own, and talk therapy can help. Seeing a therapist doesn't mean that you're crazy, or that you'll need to be in therapy forever. Short-term, solution-focused therapy can be life-changing for people who suffer from depression.
S-adenosylmethionine, or SAMe
SAMe, is the synthetic form of a compound that naturally occurs in the body. While SAMe is used widely in Europe to treat depression, it's not yet approved by the FDA for that use. Nevertheless, it's available in U.S. pharmacies and drug stores without a prescription and may be worth a shot if you're interested in using natural supplementation to ease your depression symptoms.
Microcirculation
Using an alternative treatment or medication that aids in your body's natural microcirculation processes may be helpful for people with several mental health conditions, including depression. D'OXYVA is a popular non-invasive therapy that uses medical grade CO2 that can significantly help your body's microcirculation process. This can improve the processes of your body's autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary actions in your body (like digestion and breathing). When your body's autonomic nervous system is functioning at a higher level, you're likely to get better sleep, experience better digestion, and experience a heightened sense of well-being, which may contribute to the lessening of depressive symptoms.
Eating fish
Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish may help the brain to control the symptoms of depression. While more studies need to be done, the initial research has shown that the acids help ease depressive symptoms. Both D’OXYVA therapy and eating fish work to contribute to greater overall mental health.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR, DR. STEVEN GELBARD
D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD is a Neurosurgeon that has been in practice in Florida for almost 30 years. He graduated from Tufts University School Of Medicine and then did additional training at NYU, Brown University and Harvard Medical School affiliated Hospitals, as well as other prestigious institutions. He holds several US patents for medical inventions and has worked with professional sports teams including the NHL Florida Panthers hockey team, the NFL Miami Dolphins football team, and the ABA Florida Pitbulls basketball team. He is currently the Medical Director of the ReLife Miami Institute.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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5 Ways to Improve Your Mental Health

Improve Your Mental Health

By Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD, Medical Director of ReLife Miami Institute

Sometimes, a mental health issue manifests as emotional outbursts rather than chronic anxiousness or periods of depression. You may notice you’re overeating or not eating enough, so you had a recent change in your weight. You could be suffering from insomnia, frequently waking up through the night, or oversleeping. It’s possible to improve your mental state of health and improve your overall quality of life, though.

1. Change Your Diet

A mineral or vitamin deficiency may be the root of your anxiousness or depression. For instance, zinc has an impact on your mood. It’s possible to feel depressed if you have a zinc deficiency. Studies have shown a link with low zinc levels in their blood and depression. Moreover, it appears there’s a correlation between zinc levels and the severity of a person’s depression. Zinc is necessary for the release of certain hormones, including stress hormones. A zinc deficiency can also lead to aggravation. Zinc isn’t the only nutrient that can interfere with your happiness and mental health; so can B-complex vitamins, iron, and vitamin D, among others. Try to consume a diet rich in nutrients. If you can’t, consider supplementing.

2. Go for Regular Walks

It’s important to keep yourself active, even if you’re at your ideal weight. A walk can help reduce your stress and boost your energy levels. It’s also hindering you from using your electronic devices. Walking has the potential to boost your energy levels and help you to refocus your mind. After you begin walking regularly, you may notice your symptoms of depression are decreasing.

3. Take Time Each Day Without Electronic Devices

If it’s possible, spend time at some point during your day partaking in an activity besides playing on the tablet, using your cell phone, or watching television. The excessive use of electronic devices has been linked to depression and anxiety. The calls and emails can become overwhelmingly stressful. Plus, electronic devices emit blue light, which interferes with your body’s sleep schedule. Therefore, it’s particularly important to avoid devices immediately before bed.

4. Improve Your Sleep Habits

Your body requires sleep to revitalize itself and for your body to function normally the following day. If you’re not sleeping enough, it affects your neurotransmitter levels as well as your stress hormones. Ultimately, this takes a toll on your mental health. You may have difficulty regulating your emotions. This could lead to emotional outbursts, depression, and anxiety. Some ways to improve your sleep include avoid caffeine too close to bedtime and avoiding smoking before bed.

5. Consider Using D’OXYVA

D’OXYVA is a unique non-invasive device that releases a transdermal, medical-grade, supersaturated carbon dioxide vapor. As it penetrates through your skin, it optimizes your circulation even down to your small blood vessels. The blood flow through your smallest blood vessels is known as microcirculation, and it’s particularly important for your nerve function as well as the production of certain hormones. For instance, microcirculation plays a role in your adrenal gland. An insufficiency in the amount of adrenaline your body secretes can lead to changes in your personality and mood.

This therapy affects the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for the tasks your body regulates on its own, such as your digestion, breathing, and heart rate. Issues within your autonomic nervous system can lead to issues like erectile dysfunction and blood pressure problems.

Your mental health has a profound impact on your quality of life. Fortunately, you can take steps to proactively improve your mental health through lifestyle changes. Additionally, you may want to consider trying D’OXYVA to optimize your mental and overall health and well-being.

About Dr. Steven Gelbard

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Dr. Steven Gelbard, MD is a Neurosurgeon that has been in practice in Florida for almost 30 years. He graduated from Tufts University School Of Medicine and then did additional training at NYU, Brown University and Harvard Medical School affiliated Hospitals, as well as other prestigious institutions. He holds several US patents for medical inventions and has worked with professional sports teams including the NHL Florida Panthers hockey team, the NFL Miami Dolphins football team, and the ABA Florida Pitbulls basketball team. He is currently the Medical Director of the ReLife Miami Institute.

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Why Good Blood Circulation Is Important for Overall Health

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Proper blood circulation is the most important function of the human body, and it can play a very big role in one’s overall health. One of the vital components of the body, which is involved in this function, is the heart.

People often underestimate the important role of lifestyle choices on blood circulation, which can be significantly hindered by those choices. The following can negatively affect blood circulation:

  • Smoking
  • Not doing regular physical exercise
  • Leaving blood clots untreated
  • Having certain illnesses like heart diseases or diabetes

Patients suffering from poor blood circulation issues must consult Circularity Healthcare for advice and treatment.

The following are ways that blood circulation can impact a person’s health:

Benefits of good blood circulation

The following are a few benefits of good blood circulation:

  1. The body can maintain healthy oxygen and blood flow, which will allow the heart, lungs and muscles to function properly and efficiently.
  2. The body can avoid and fight diseases and sicknesses. In addition, white blood cells in the immune system can be transported around the body as needed.
  3. The organs will remain in proper working order and help remove waste from the body.

Risks of poor blood circulation

The following are a few effects of having poor blood circulation:

  1. One may feel a lack of energy, inability to concentrate and excessive tiredness.
  2. Limited oxygen flow to the brain can cause memory glitches.
  3. Women may suffer from hair loss or alopecia.
  4. Men may suffer from erectile dysfunction.
  5. Sores and cuts may take much longer to heal.
  6. Poor blood circulation may cause amputation of the affected limb.

 

How can one improve circulation?

To improve blood circulation, a person needs to make a few lifestyle changes. The following tips can help:

  1. Doing yoga involves the stretching and bending of the body to different postures for a certain duration. In the beginning, it may be little difficult, but soon with regular practice, one can achieve the desired results.
  2. Massages can be another great way of relaxing and unwinding. This can also help in bonding well with a partner.
  3. Engaging in certain cardiovascular exercises can help one maintain a healthy weight and can improve blood circulation.
  4. It is also important to keep the body well hydrated by drinking enough liquids, including water, to flush out all the toxins present in the blood.
  5. Many people are not aware that eating seafood can also improve blood circulation because of the omega-3 fatty acids it contains. A few of the healthiest choices are salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines.

People suffering from poor blood circulation always risk getting blood clots and must contact a physician or healthcare professional for proper advice on improving blood circulation.

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HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA (deoxyhemoglobin vasodilator) is the first of its kind biotech solution. D’OXYVA has been clinically validated for a variety of significant and rare health, athletic, and cosmetic benefits with record time and cost savings. The FDA-cleared medical CO2 and gentle vapor dissolves in a molecular form in the skin to improve skin perfusion pressure or blood circulation.

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Prior Stroke and Other Cerebrovascular Risk Factors Linked with Parkinson’s Disease

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Medical conditions and health habits that affect blood flow in the brain—or cerebrovascular risk factors—are associated with a subsequent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.

The findings, published Aug. 29 in the Annals of Neurology, opens the door to investigating whether better management of cerebrovascular risk factors such as prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes and tobacco use, may help to prevent Parkinson’s disease.

The link between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s disease is “similar to the already established relationship between such risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease, although slightly attenuated,” said senior study author Dr. Babak Navi, the Florence Gould Foundation Research Scholar for Discovery in Stroke, an associate professor of neurology in the Department of Neurology and an associate professor of neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine.

While much of the public is already aware that cerebrovascular risk factors increase the odds of developing Alzheimer’s disease, people don’t know that these same factors could put them at risk for Parkinson’s, said Dr. Navi, who is chief of the Division of Stroke and Hospital Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, where he is also an associate attending neurologist. “I think new knowledge about this association is empowering because it gives doctors and their patients another reason to get cerebrovascular risk factors under control.”

Parkinson’s disease is a prevalent and disabling condition, said Dr. Benjamin Kummer, lead author and a vascular neurology fellow at Weill Cornell Medicine when the study was conducted. About 650,000 Americans are currently living with Parkinson’s, a neurodegenerative disease that can cause debilitating tremors, the slowing of movements and changes in speech, among other symptoms. While the study did find an association between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s, “it did not find causation,” cautioned Dr. Kummer, who is now an assistant professor of neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and a clinical informaticist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,035,546 people age 66 years or older who enrolled in Medicare. These patients were evaluated for one or more of the following 14 cerebrovascular disease risk factors: prior stroke, atrial fibrillation, coronary heart disease, high cholesterol (also known as hyperlipidemia), hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart valve disease, obstructive sleep apnea, tobacco use and alcohol abuse.

During a five-year period, 15,531 of the patients, or about 1.5 percent, received a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis, while 81,974, or nearly 8 percent, developed Alzheimer’s disease.

While alcohol abuse and hyperlipidemia were not associated with Parkinson’s disease, the other 12 risk factors were. Notably, prior stroke and obstructive sleep apnea increased the relative risk of developing Parkinson’s by 55 percent and 65 percent, respectively, Dr. Navi said.

The strong association with stroke may exist because Parkinson’s disease can sometimes arise from strokes that occur in a region of the brain called the basal ganglia, which is responsible for voluntary movement, among other functions, Dr. Navi said. Additionally, prior stroke, which is caused by blockages of blood flow to the brain and can damage neurons, is probably the most severe cerebrovascular risk factor. “If you have a stroke, you have cerebrovascular disease,” he said.

Obstructive sleep apnea can increase a person’s risk of hypertension or stroke, which may be why the sleep disorder was closely linked with Parkinson’s. The association of obstructive sleep apnea with Parkinson’s disease was even stronger than Alzheimer’s, Dr. Navi said.

All 14 of the cerebrovascular risk factors were associated with Alzheimer’s, confirming this already well-known and strong association, said Dr. Navi.

As a control group, the researchers assessed the rate of renal colic, or pain in the urinary tract from kidney stones, anticipating that this condition would not be associated with cerebrovascular risk factors. “We looked at renal colic and found that most risk factors were not associated with it, which ensured the validity of our model,” Dr. Navi said.

The study also improves upon prior research by being larger and nationally representative and looking at essentially all major cerebrovascular risk factors as opposed to just one or two, Dr. Navi said.

Going forward, researchers need to establish what cellular and molecular mechanisms underlie the link between cerebrovascular risk factors and Parkinson’s disease pathology, said study co-author Dr. Costantino Iadecola, director of the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, the Anne Parrish Titzell Professor of Neurology and a professor of neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medicine.

One avenue of exploration is how damage to the blood vessels of the brain may affect alpha-synuclein. This protein helps neurons communicate with one another and has been linked to Parkinson’s disease, Dr. Iadecola said. “Scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine are well positioned to look at this completely new area of research,” he said. “If we can understand the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s, we are more likely to develop disease-modifying treatments.”

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Mental health crisis hotline launched in the Philippines

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Amid the rising suicide prevalence in the country, the Department of Health (DOH) yesterday launched a mental health crisis hotline aimed at helping curb the problem.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said the National Center for Mental Health (NCMH) crisis hotline will operate 24/7 to provide counseling for those at risk of committing suicide and other people suffering from mental health conditions.

The new NCMH crisis hotline can be reached at 0917-899 8727 or 989-8727.

“Everyone is enjoined to support the dissemination of the hotline numbers,” Duque said as he noted the many lives that can be saved with the use of the hotline.

Duque said mental illness is a major public health concern in the country, with many patients reluctant to seek medical treatment due to stigma.

He said without the proper necessary intervention, many of those who are suffering from mental conditions take their own lives.

Data showed that 3.2 percent of every country’s population is likely to commit suicide.

Studies indicated that suicide is the second leading cause of death among people aged 29 to 59 years old worldwide.

The Goulbourn Foundation, which also operates a 24-hour suicide prevention hotline in coordination with the DOH, reported that three young people committed suicide last week.

The foundation said the youngest suicide victim they have recorded was a seven-year-old child.

There is still no available data on the national prevalence of mental illness in the Philippines, but the DOH said a study is underway to determine the extent of the problem.

Duque said records from the NCMH showed the government-run institution has an average of 7,500 in-patients and serves up to 65,000 outpatients annually.

“The NCMH figure could be an indicator of the gravity of mental health problem in the country,” he said.

Duque expressed optimism that the health problem could be addressed with the implementation of the Mental Health Act.

He said the law mandates the DOH to develop a national suicide prevention strategy, which now includes the establishment of the NCMH crisis hotline.

NCMH officer-in-charge Allan Troy Baquir said the hotline would help people who are experiencing anxiety and depression as well as health workers who need guidance in handling their patients with mental illness.

Operating on a P7-million budget, the hotline will assess the needs of the callers and refer them to proper specialist or medical facilities if necessary.

Also yesterday, the DOH launched programs under the Kalusugan at Nutrisyon ng Mag-Nanay Act.

The new program aims to boost children’s health and reduce stunting and malnutrition.

Duque said the DOH would provide pregnancy and after birth medical services to both mothers and infants.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Older adults more likely to develop dementia after a concussion, Canadian study finds

dementia

Older adults are much more likely to develop dementia after experiencing a concussion, according to a large new Canadian study. But the researchers also found this risk may be modestly reduced by taking a certain group of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

The study, published on Monday in the journal JAMA Neurology, found one in six Ontarians, ages 65 and older, were diagnosed with dementia within an average of four years after suffering a concussion. That was double the rate for the rest of the population.

The study, however, found that concussion patients who took statins, a class of drugs commonly used to prevent heart disease, had about 10 to 15 per cent lower risk of dementia than those who did not.

While this suggests statins may help patients’ brains recover after a concussion, the findings underscore the importance of protecting one’s brain in the first place, says lead investigator Donald Redelmeier, a senior scientist at ICES (formerly the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences).

“More prevention of concussion is justified, not just in exuberant young athletes, but throughout the lifespan,” says Dr. Redelmeier, who is also a physician at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto.

The study adds to growing evidence linking concussions to the development of dementia. In a separate study published last year in JAMA Neurology, for example, U.S. researchers examining more than 350,000 military veterans similarly found they were two times more likely to develop dementia after experiencing a concussion.

One of the researchers of that earlier study, Kristine Yaffe, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of California San Francisco, says scientists do not fully understand why concussions may lead to dementia. One possible explanation is that the injuries may accelerate brain aging and the accumulation of abnormal proteins, such as tau and amyloid, which cause damage to neurons, she says.

In the new study published on Monday, Dr. Redelmeier and his team examined data from 1993 to 2013 for nearly 29,000 Ontarians, age 65 and older, who were not previously diagnosed with dementia before suffering a concussion. They found more than 4,700 of them developed dementia over a minimum follow-up period of three years.

Patients who were prescribed a statin within 90 days of having a concussion had about a 13 per cent lower risk of dementia, compared with those who were not.

Dr. Redelmeier says patients who were on statins were taking the drugs incidentally, for reasons unrelated to their concussion, and most were taking the drug before and after their injury. The researchers found other medications, including other cardiovascular drugs and neuropsychiatric medications, did not appear to make a difference to patients’ risk of dementia.

Based on experimental models, statins can mitigate injury-related brain swelling, inflammation, and faulty microcirculation, affecting the tiniest vessels of the brain, Dr. Redelmeier says, explaining this may be why statins appear to offer some protection against dementia after a concussion.

He points out that one of the main limitations of his study is that it was not a randomized trial, so it could not show whether statins actually caused a lower dementia risk. However, he says, patients using statins tend to start off with more risk factors for dementia prior to having a concussion, so his study may, in fact, underestimate the potential benefits of the drugs.

“There may be a role for actually beginning a statin in the immediate aftermath of a concussion,” provided it is appropriate based on a patient’s age and health, Dr. Redelmeier says. But, he says, it is yet unclear how long patients would need to stay on the drug to reduce their dementia risk.

“If you’re already on a statin and unfortunate enough to have a concussion, keep taking your statin,” he advises.

More importantly, he adds, people should take precautions against brain injury: “So that means driving safely, walking mindfully, using protective gear, staying sober and staying away from risky situations.”

 

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation. According to a study published in Alzheimers Association,  improvement in cerebral blood supply and microcirculation promotes remission in Alzheimer’s disease.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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The Alzheimer’s-blood pressure connection

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Rock legends David Bowie and Freddie Mercury must have known something that science discovered only recently. In their rock anthem “Under Pressure,” they crooned: “Pressure pushing down on me … Chipping around, kick my brains around the floor.”

Researchers wouldn’t put it quite that way, but there is a correlation between a person’s elevated blood pressure later in life and brain health, particularly Alzheimer’s disease risk. A study in Neurology recorded the blood pressure of 1,300 people ages 59 to 102 annually for a mean of eight years. Brain autopsies of deceased subjects then revealed a link between high blood pressure and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles, characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

An elevated systolic, or top number, above 134 mmHG increased the odds of developing brain lesions by nearly 50%. But according to Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, anything above 120 puts you in the “new risk zone.” The study didn’t find a correlation with an elevation of the diastolic (the bottom number) and Alzheimer’s.

The good news: Lifestyle changes can help you achieve a healthy blood pressure of around 120/75. The DASH, Mediterranean and “What to Eat When” diets are a smart starting point. Check out Sharecare.com for info on these nutritional approaches and to download a free phone app to keep track of your numbers. Plus, ask your doc about medications and at-home, self-measured blood pressure monitors; the cuff ones are usually reliable, but should be checked against one at your doc’s office.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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Exploring The Link Between Inflammation And Depression: Study Suggests Women Are Affected The Most

depression

The link between depression and the body’s inflammatory response continues getting stronger, with more research showing an ever-tighter correlation. Whether inflammation causes depression has been difficult to nail down, but findings from a new study suggest we could be getting closer to an answer. For women in particular, it seems higher levels of inflammation can lead to an underlying condition that fuels depression.

That condition is called anhedonia, defined as “a loss of enjoyment in things and activities.” Depression patients frequently experience anhedonia as a loss of positive sensation for things that used to bring joy, like visiting certain places, taking part in social activities, even eating certain foods.

Women are roughly twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression as men (about one in eight women will experience depression in their lifetimes), and anhedonia is frequently cited as a major symptom.

The study started there, trying to determine if the link between inflammation and depression plays out differently in women and men. The researchers took a more direct route than we see in most research in this area, by inducing inflammation in participants with a substance called endotoxin, which according to the study “increases inflammation in a safe, time-limited manner.” Other participants received a placebo.

Two hours later, when inflammation was peaking, the participants played a game designed to build their anticipation of a cash reward while their brains were scanned in an fMRI machine. The point of this was to evaluate activity in a brain area called the ventral striatum (VS), a core part of the brain’s dopamine-fueled “reward center.”

In the brain, anhedonia is characterized by reduced activity in the VS, which can also be described as experiencing less energy from anticipating life’s rewards (i.e. the people, places, and things that used to bring joy).

The results showed that compared to those receiving a placebo, the brains of women with the biggest inflammatory response to endotoxin also had the biggest decrease in VS activity. The same result wasn’t found in men.

“The study is the first to show that there are sex differences in neural sensitivity to reward in response to inflammation, which has important implications,” said senior author Naomi Eisenberger, PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles.  “This may suggest one reason women experience depression at a far greater rate than men, particularly for the kinds of depression that may be inflammatory in nature.”

The results are important for a few reasons. First, they further strengthen the link between inflammation and depression. Inflammation may not lurk behind all cases of depression, but at this point the evidence strongly suggests that a significant percentage of depression cases are at least influenced by inflammation. Most research in this area can’t determine the direction of the “cause arrow,” but in this study it appears increased inflammation could be causing decreased activity in the brain’s reward center.

Next, the results help fill out a growing understanding of sex differences in depression cases, pointing to a need for health professionals to pay more attention to the role inflammation could be playing especially in their female patients’ mental health.

“This [study] suggests that women with chronic inflammatory disorders may be particularly vulnerable to developing depression through decreases in sensitivity to reward,” added the study’s first author Mona Moieni, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher. “Clinicians who treat female patients with inflammatory disorders may want to pay close attention to these patients for possible onset of depressive symptoms.”

This wasn’t a huge study (115 participants) and it’ll need replication for the results to hold up, but it’s a meaningful piece in a sprawling puzzle. Next phases of the research will likely focus on why inflammation appears to influence depression differently in women and men, along with delving deeper into the link between the conditions across all patients.

The study was published in the journal Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

The microcirculation is highly responsive to, and a vital participant in, the inflammatory response. All segments of the microvasculature (arterioles, capillaries, and venules) exhibit characteristic phenotypic changes during inflammation that appear to be directed toward enhancing the delivery of inflammatory cells to the injured/infected tissue, isolating the region from healthy tissue and the systemic circulation, and setting the stage for tissue repair and regeneration. 

The best characterized responses of the microcirculation to inflammation include impaired vasomotor function, reduced capillary perfusion, adhesion of leukocytes and platelets, activation of the coagulation cascade, and enhanced thrombosis, increased vascular permeability, and an increase in the rate of proliferation of blood and lymphatic vessels. A variety of cells that normally circulate in blood (leukocytes, platelets) or reside within the vessel wall (endothelial cells, pericytes) or in the perivascular space (mast cells, macrophages) are activated in response to inflammation. The activation products and chemical mediators released from these cells act through different well-characterized signaling pathways to induce the phenotypic changes in microvessel function that accompany inflammation.  Inflammation and the Microcirculation; by D. Neil Granger and Elena Senchenkova; San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010.

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation.

The improvement of microcirculation, i.e., blood flow to the smallest blood vessels, benefits one’s health, immune system and overall sense of well-being in a variety of ways.

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A Blood Test Can Predict Dementia. Trouble Is, There’s No Cure

D'OXYVA | Cardiovascular, Diabetes Care, Pain Reliever in CA.

Nobel prizewinner Koichi Tanaka says the predictive blood test for Alzheimer’s disease he and colleagues spent almost a decade developing is a double-edged sword.

Without medications to stave off the memory-robbing condition, identifying those at risk will do nothing to ease the dementia burden and may fuel anxiety. But used to identify the best patients to enroll in drug studies, the minimally invasive exam could speed the development of therapies for the 152 million people predicted to develop the illness by 2050.

 

“We must be cautious on how the test is used because there’s no curative treatment,” Tanaka said in an interview at Kyoto, Japan-based Shimadzu Corp., where he’s worked for 36 years. The 59-year-old engineer, who shared the Nobel for chemistry in 2002, said he hopes the test he helped pioneer will one day be administered routinely, but right now it belongs in the hands of drug developers and research laboratories.

 
 

More than a century after the telltale signs of Alzheimer’s were first seen under a microscope, and billions of dollars in research spending by Roche Holding AG, Eli Lilly & Co.Eisai Co. and other companies, there’s still no drug slow down the disease.

 

In the absence of medical breakthroughs, the worldwide cost of dementia is projected double to $2 trillion by 2030.

 

Nature Study

“There are many reasons why drugmakers have failed to develop a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, but it’s too late to start treatment when patients already show symptoms,” Tanaka said.

In a study published in Nature in January last year, Tanaka and colleagues showed it was possible to use a novel biomarker discovered by his lab to accurately quantify minute traces of amyloid-beta from a teaspoonful of blood, and gauge the progression of Alzheimer’s — allowing identification of people likely to develop dementia over the coming decades.

Previously, the brain changes that occur long before Alzheimer’s symptoms appear could only be reliably assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron-emission tomography (PET) scans, and from measuring amyloid and another errant protein called tau in spinal cord fluid — methods that are expensive and, in the case of a spinal tap, invasive.

“Our finding overturned the common belief that it wouldn’t be possible to estimate amyloid accumulation in the brain from blood,” Tanaka said. “We’re now being chased by others, and the competition is intensifying.”

Roche, Quanterix

About a dozen companies and research groups from around the world, including Roche, Spain’s Araclon Biotech SL, and Lexington, Massachusetts-based Quanterix Corp., are pursuing blood-based diagnostic tools for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“These blood tests are very important to that aim of trying to get these groups identified and ready to go into trials, and make them faster and less expensive,” said Christopher Rowe, a neurologist who heads molecular imaging research at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne. “That, in turn, is the greatest hope for having a significant impact on the epidemic.”

 

Risky Endeavor

Estimated cost of developing a drug through to regulatory approval

The global Alzheimer’s disease diagnostics and therapeutics market is predicted to reach $11.1 billion in 2024 from $7.5 billion last year, ResearchAndMarkets.com said in March.

 
 

‘Exceptional Accuracy’

“You really get exceptional accuracy,” said Bateman, whose lab studies the causes, diagnosis and treatments of Alzheimer’s disease. “I could see that easily becoming a clinical standard.”

Shimadzu Corp.'s Nobel-winning Researcher Koichi Tanaka Interview

Shimadzu’s AXIMA series mass spectrometer.

Photographer: Shoko Takayasu/Bloomberg

Both the Shimadzu and Washington University groups use an analytical technique called mass spectrometry that can search for a particular compound based on its specific molecular weight and charge. The method was found to be 90% accurate when it was checked against brain scans, Tanaka and colleagues said in their Nature paper.

Tanaka likens the approach to fishing with bait that only a specific fish will take. It enabled him to more precisely quantify amyloid in blood than an older, antibody-based method, he said.

New digital technology has bolstered the antibody-based test, with Quanterix using it to detect the errant proteins associated with the start of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as neurofilament light chain — a marker of neurological injury that can be elevated by conditions including concussion, Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis.

“There’s an incredible opportunity to transform brain health by understanding your neuro baseline,” said Kevin Hrusovsky, Quanterix’s chief executive officer.

‘Game-Changing’

Several drugmakers are trying to get tests for neurofilament light chain validated clinically as a complementary diagnostic tool because they will enable patients’ responses to medications to be monitored in real time, providing an early signal of efficacy, Hrusovsky said. “There’s a lot of evidence that this is going to be game-changing,” he said.

Roche is evaluating the use of Elecsys, which tests cerebrospinal fluid for signs of Alzheimer’s, in blood plasma, the Swiss company said in an emailed response to questions.

Shimadzu Corp.'s Nobel-winning Researcher Koichi Tanaka Interview

Tanaka is a senior fellow at Shimadzu.

Photographer: Shoko Takayasu/Bloomberg

Shimadzu finished analyzing amyloid levels in blood-serum samples from 2,000 patients in March, Tanaka said. The company is preparing to offer the service in the U.S. this year before extending it to Europe and China.

“One thing we are looking into is running prospective cohort studies targeting people who have started to build up amyloid in the brain and see whether anything — food, exercise — can intervene to slow the progression of the disease,” the Nobel laureate said. “There are many things to be done.”

— With assistance by Jason Gale, and Tim Loh

HOW D’OXYVA CAN HELP?

Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brains of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in Experimental Physiology [published online July 5, 2018]. Exp Physiol. doi: 10.1113/EP086994.].  The study revealed that possibly because of lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from brain blood vessels, patients are at higher risk of dementia. 

Another research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s & Dementia says improving cerebral microcirculation and metabolism leads to the regression of dementia and cognitive impairment and causes long-term ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE remission. https://www.alzheimersanddementia.com/article/S1552-5260(16)31871-4/fulltext

D’OXYVA is the only fully noninvasive, completely painless transdermal (over-the-skin) microcirculatory solution that has been clinically tested to significantly improve microcirculation and oxygenation. Based on years of experience, D’OXYVA has continued developing microcirculation therapy. This process, unique to D’OXYVA, has demonstrated triggering protective physiological functions in the body: vasodilation and vasoconstrictions in the vessels, catalyzing vessel structure growth (angiogenesis), autoregulation of local blood supply in tissues and organs, neuroreceptor signaling in the brain and balancing blood pH, among other critical functions.