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Peripheral Edema and D’OXYVA Transdermal Application as a Potential Treatment Option

Peripheral edema is the result/manifestation of many diseases, inflammation processes, and loss of body compensatory mechanism of chronic conditions, but the first pathophysiology disturbance is at the capillary level (microcirculation). D’OXYVA® transdermal COapplication has demonstrated to be beneficial to improve blood flow by decreasing microcirculation blood resistance and improving venous insufficiency. COis one of the few local humoral mediators with the potential to modulate blood flow in capillary beds. COenhances the following capillary bed functions:

– Arteriole elastic retractions and vasomotion that allows constant blood flow through the capillary bed.

– Reconstruct the role of adjacent closed capillaries.

– Promote vasodilation of the arterio-venous anastomosis without increased venous return.

Also, COis a natural anti-inflammatory agent that helps one’s circulatory system to perform better. CO2  especially helps one’s circulatory system by increasing venous blood return to the heart and systolic output by passive peripheral vasodilation, without increasing mean arterial blood pressure.
It is important that any patient who has edema needs to be followed/supervised by a physician because there is the need to assess critical organ functions and etiology of the disease, like BP, venous obstruction, low plasma protein concentration, or lymphatic obstruction among others.

 

 

References:
Cellulite and carbon dioxide bath. (2009, May 9).

Dogaru gabriela, r. A. (2015). Therapeutic effects of carbonated mineral waters in cardiovascular rehabilitation . Balneo research journal, 36-39.

Maria vitória carmo penhaveli, v. H. (2013). Effects of carbon dioxide therapy on the healing of acute skin wounds induced on the back of rats1. Acta cirúrgica brasileira , 334-339.

Nouvong, j. S. (n.d.). Assessment of microcirculation and the prediction of healing in diabetic foot ulcers. Western University of Health Sciences, College of Podiatric Medicine United States of America:

www.intechopen.com.